Archive for New York Subway

[h]it figures

Posted in Books, pictures with tags , , , , , on June 1, 2014 by xi'an

Just a few figures from wordpress about the ‘Og:

  • 2,845 posts;
  • 1,009,428 views;
  • 5,115 comments;
  • 5,095 tags;
  • 470,427 spam comments;
  • 1,001 spams in the past 24 hours;
  • and… only 5 amazon orders in the past month!

art brut

Posted in pictures, Travel with tags , on October 15, 2011 by xi'an

Weird moment

Posted in pictures, Travel with tags , on September 25, 2011 by xi'an

As I was waiting at the 86th street station, for a Line 1 subway train to get back to Columbia,  an express Line 2 zoomed by with the usual deafening noise and its whiff of better left unidentified odors… And then, as the train was vanishing into the tunnel, I had the fleeting vision of a red wreath attached to the back door! (As the thing could not be a life-preserver (!) I wonder what it was. Or if I urgently need to check my vision…)

Reading in the subway

Posted in Books, Travel with tags , , on September 7, 2009 by xi'an

There is a paper on the joy of reading in the Subway in the New York Times today. I indeed noticed when riding the Subway a few weeks ago that a lot of people were reading books (or Kindles) there. It is also true in the Parisian RER, but the difference seems to be that people like to share about their books, something you would never hear in the French metro! For instance, I witnessed a trio getting engaged into a lively conversation about Salman Rushdie after one noticed the other reading Midnight’s Children and mentioning how much she liked it compared with the Satanic Verses, to which the reader and a third party acknowledged they had not read it… I had to leave the train in the middle of the conversation, unfortunately, but this was an interesting moment! I hope those comments make their way to the Subway Book Club. Incidentally, my last book started in the métro is Jonathan Coe’s The Rotters’ Club and, were it mine, I could easily forget it there, so poorly impressed am I with the story, even though the rendering of the seventies in Birmingham—where I used to go at about this period—is tolerably realistic.