Archive for Nicolas Chopin

LMS Invited Lecture Series and CRISM Summer School in Computational Statistics, just started!

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on July 9, 2018 by xi'an

seeking the error in nested sampling

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel with tags , , , , , , on April 13, 2017 by xi'an

A newly arXived paper on the error in nested sampling, written by Higson and co-authors, and read in Berlin, looks at the difficult task of evaluating the sampling error of nested sampling. The conclusion is essentially negative in that the authors recommend multiple runs of the method to assess the magnitude of the variability of the output by bootstrap, i.e. to call for the most empirical approach…

The core of this difficulty lies in the half-plug-in, half-quadrature, half-Monte Carlo (!) feature of the nested sampling algorithm, in that (i) the truncation of the unit interval is based on a expectation of the mass of each shell (i.e., the zone between two consecutive isoclines of the likelihood, (ii) the evidence estimator is a quadrature formula, and (iii) the level of the likelihood at the truncation is replaced with a simulated value that is not even unbiased (and correlated with the previous value in the case of an MCMC implementation). As discussed in our paper with Nicolas, the error in the evidence approximation is of the same order as other Monte Carlo methods in that it gets down like the square root of the number of terms at each iteration. Contrary to earlier intuitions that focussed on the error due to the quadrature.

But the situation is much less understood when the resulting sample is used for estimation of quantities related with the posterior distribution. With no clear approach to assess and even less correct the resulting error, since it is not solely a Monte Carlo error. As noted by the authors, the quadrature approximation to the univariate integral replaces the unknown prior weight of a shell with its Beta order statistic expectation and the average of the likelihood over the shell with a single (uniform???) realisation. Or the mean value of a transform of the parameter with a single (biased) realisation. Since most posterior expectations can be represented as integrals over likelihood levels of the average value over an iso-likelihood contour. The approach advocated in the paper involved multiple threads of an “unwoven nested sampling run”, which means launching n nested sampling runs with one living term from the n currents living points in the current nested sample. (Those threads may then later be recombined into a single nested sample.) This is the starting point to a nested flavour of bootstrapping, where threads are sampled with replacement, from which confidence intervals and error estimates can be constructed. (The original notion appears in Skilling’s 2006 paper, but I missed it.)

The above graphic is an attempt within the paper at representing the (marginal) posterior of a transform f(θ). That I do not fully understand… The notations are rather horrendous as X is not the data but the prior probability for the likelihood to be above a given bound which is actually the corresponding quantile. (There is no symbol for data and £ is used for the likelihood function as well as realisations of the likelihood function…) A vertical slice on the central panel gives the posterior distribution of f(θ) given the event that the likelihood is in the corresponding upper tail. Or given the corresponding shell (?).

truncated normal algorithms

Posted in Books, pictures, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , on January 4, 2017 by xi'an

Nicolas Chopin (CREST) just posted an entry on Statisfaction about the comparison of truncated Normal algorithms run by Alan Rogers, from the University of Utah. Nicolas wrote a paper in Statistics and Computing about a simulation method, which proposes a Ziggurat type of algorithm for this purpose, and which I do not remember reading, thanks to my diminishing memory buffer!  As shown in the picture below, when truncating to the half-line (a,∞), this method improves upon my accept-reject approach except in the far tails.

truncanormOn the top graph, made by Alan Rogers, my uniform proposal (r) seems to be doing better for a Normal truncated to (a,b) when b<0, or when a gets large and close to b. Nicolas’ ziggurat (c) works better than the Gaussian accept-reject method (c) on the positive part. (I wonder what the exponential proposal (e) stands for, in terms of scale parameter.)

Rémi Bardenet’s seminar

Posted in Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 7, 2016 by xi'an

Grand Palais from Esplanade des Invalides, Paris, Dec. 07, 2012Next week, Rémi Bardenet is giving a seminar in Paris, Thursday April 14, 2pm, in ENSAE [room 15] on MCMC methods for tall data. Unfortunately, I will miss this opportunity to discuss with Rémi as I will be heading to La Sapienza, Roma, for Clara Grazian‘s PhD defence the next day.  And on Monday afternoon, April 11, Nicolas Chopin will give a talk on quasi-Monte Carlo for sequential problems at Institut Henri Poincaré.

discussions on Gerber and Chopin

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2015 by xi'an

As a coincidence, I received my copy of JRSS Series B with the Read Paper by Mathieu Gerber and Nicolas Chopin on sequential quasi Monte Carlo just as I was preparing an arXival of a few discussions on the paper! Among the [numerous and diverse] discussions, a few were of particular interest to me [I highlighted members of the University of Warwick and of Université Paris-Dauphine to suggest potential biases!]:

  1. Mike Pitt (Warwick), Murray Pollock et al.  (Warwick) and Finke et al. (Warwick) all suggested combining quasi Monte Carlo with pseudomarginal Metropolis-Hastings, pMCMC (Pitt) and Rao-Bklackwellisation (Finke et al.);
  2. Arnaud Doucet pointed out that John Skilling had used the Hilbert (ordering) curve in a 2004 paper;
  3. Chris Oates, Dan Simpson and Mark Girolami (Warwick) suggested combining quasi Monte Carlo with their functional control variate idea;
  4. Richard Everitt wondered about the dimension barrier of d=6 and about possible slice extensions;
  5. Zhijian He and Art Owen pointed out simple solutions to handle a random number of uniforms (for simulating each step in sequential Monte Carlo), namely to start with quasi Monte Carlo and end up with regular Monte Carlo, in an hybrid manner;
  6. Hans Künsch points out the connection with systematic resampling à la Carpenter, Clifford and Fearnhead (1999) and wonders about separating the impact of quasi Monte Carlo between resampling and propagating [which vaguely links to one of my comments];
  7. Pierre L’Ecuyer points out a possible improvement over the Hilbert curve by a preliminary sorting;
  8. Frederik Lindsten and Sumeet Singh propose using ABC to extend the backward smoother to intractable cases [but still with a fixed number of uniforms to use at each step], as well as Mateu and Ryder (Paris-Dauphine) for a more general class of intractable models;
  9. Omiros Papaspiliopoulos wonders at the possibility of a quasi Markov chain with “low discrepancy paths”;
  10. Daniel Rudolf suggest linking the error rate of sequential quasi Monte Carlo with the bounds of Vapnik and Ĉervonenkis (1977).

 The arXiv document also includes the discussions by Julyan Arbel and Igor Prünster (Turino) on the Bayesian nonparametric side of sqMC and by Robin Ryder (Dauphine) on the potential of sqMC for ABC.

not converging to London for an [extra]ordinary Read Paper

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on November 21, 2014 by xi'an

London by Delta, Dec. 14, 2011On December 10, I will alas not travel to London to attend the Read Paper on sequential quasi-Monte Carlo presented by Mathieu Gerber and Nicolas Chopin to The Society, as I fly instead to Montréal for the NIPS workshops… I am quite sorry to miss this event, as this is a major paper which brings quasi-Monte Carlo methods into mainstream statistics. I will most certainly write a discussion and remind Og’s readers that contributed (800 words) discussions are welcome from everyone, the deadline for submission being January 02.

a week in Warwick

Posted in Books, Kids, Running, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 19, 2014 by xi'an

Canadian geese, WarwickThis past week in Warwick has been quite enjoyable and profitable, from staying once again in a math house, to taking advantage of the new bike, to having several long discussions on several prospective and exciting projects, to meeting with some of the new postdocs and visitors, to attending Tony O’Hagan’s talk on “wrong models”. And then having Simo Särkkä who was visiting Warwick this week discussing his paper with me. And Chris Oates doing the same with his recent arXival with Mark Girolami and Nicolas Chopin (soon to be commented, of course!). And managing to run in dry conditions despite the heavy rains (but in pitch dark as sunrise is now quite late, with the help of a headlamp and the beauty of a countryside starry sky). I also evaluated several students’ projects, two of which led me to wonder when using RJMCMC was appropriate in comparing two models. In addition, I also eloped one evening to visit old (1977!) friends in Northern Birmingham, despite fairly dire London Midlands performances between Coventry and Birmingham New Street, the only redeeming feature being that the connecting train there was also late by one hour! (Not mentioning the weirdest taxi-driver ever on my way back, trying to get my opinion on whether or not he should have an affair… which at least kept me awake the whole trip!) Definitely looking forward my next trip there at the end of November.