Archive for nuclear radiation

Чорнобильська катастрофа

Posted in Kids, pictures with tags , , , , , , , , on April 26, 2016 by xi'an

World statistics day

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 20, 2015 by xi'an

Today is October 20, World Statistics Day as launched by the UN. And supported by local and international societies. In connection with that day, among many events, the RSS will be hosting a reception, China will hold a seminar in… Xi’an, how appropriate!, my friend Kerrie Mengersen will give a talk at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) on The power and promise of immersive virtual environments. (Bringing her pet crocodile to the talk, hopefully!)

Leuven9And I will also give a talk in Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, on Le délicat dilemme des tests d’hypothèse et de leur résolution bayésienne. At ISBA, which stands for Institute of Statistics, Biostatistics and Actuarial Sciences and not for the Bayesian society!. within UCL, which stands for Université Catholique de Louvain and not for University College London! (And which is not to be confused with the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, in Leuven, where I was last year for MCqMC. About 25 kilometers away.) In case this is not confusing enough, here are my slides (in English, while the talk will be in French):

Le Monde puzzle [#851]

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on February 6, 2014 by xi'an

A more unusual Le Monde mathematical puzzle:

Fifty black and white tokens are set on an equilateral triangle of side 9, black on top and white on bottom. If they can only be turned three by three, determine whether it is possible to produce a triangle with all white sides on top, under each of the following constraints:

  • the three tokens must stand on a line;
  • the three tokens must stand on a line and be contiguous;
  • the three tokens must stand on the summits of an equilateral triangle;
  • the three tokens must stand on the summits of an equilateral triangle of side one.

I could not think of a quick fix with an R code so leave it to the interested ‘Og reader… In the next issue of the Science&Médecine leaflet (Jan. 29), which appeared while I was in Warwick, there were a few entries of interest. First, the central article was about Big Data (again), but, for a change, the journalist took the pain to include French statisticians and machine learners in the picture, like Stefan Clemençon, Aurélien Garivier, Jean-Michel Loubes, and Nicolas Vayatis. (In a typical French approach, the subtitle was “A challenge for maths”, rather than statistics!) Ignoring the (minor) confusion therein of “small n, large p” with the plague of dimensionality, the article does mention a few important issues like distributed computing, inhomogeneous datasets, overfitting and learning. There are also links to the new masters in data sciences at ENSAE, Telecom-Paritech, and Paris 6-Pierre et Marie Curie. (The one in Paris-Dauphine is still under construction and will not open next year.) As a side column, the journal also wonders about the “end of Science” due to massive data influx and “Big Data” techniques that could predict and explain without requiring theories and deductive or scientific thinking. Somewhat paradoxically, the column ends up by a quote of Jean-Michel Loubes, who states that one could think “our” methods start from effects to end up with causes, but that in fact the models are highly dependent on the data. And on the opinion of experts. Doesn’t that suggest some Bayesian principles at work there?!

Another column is dedicated to Edward Teller‘s “dream” of using nuclear bombs for civil engineering, like in the Chariot project in Alaska. And the last entry is against Kelvin’s “to measure is to know”, with the title “To known is not to measure”, although it does not aim at a general philosophical level but rather objects to the unrestricted intrusion of bibliometrics and other indices brought from marketing. Written by a mathematician, this column is not directed against statistics and the Big Data revolution, but rather the myth that everything can be measured and quantified. (There was also a pointer to a tribune against the pseudo-recruiting of top researchers by Saudi universities in order to improve their Shanghai ranking but I do not have time to discuss it here. And now. Maybe later.)

quick impressions from Japan

Posted in pictures, Running, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 9, 2012 by xi'an

Just like last year trip to Shanghai was my first visit to China, this trip to Kyoto was my first time in Japan. I found the experience so exhilarating that I am already considering a trip back next year! (Especially since I could have lost all of my Kyoto pictures with my hard drive!) The mix of tradition and modernity, of history and high-tech, of chaotic architecture and smooth interactions, of rice fields in the shade of high-rises and of houses in the shade of expressways; all those snapshots, caught from the train as much as from the few hours I spent exploring the modern part of the city, are starting to blur already and I feel a need to go beyond to get a broader and deeper perspective on this fascinating country! Continue reading