Archive for open access

Nature tidbits

Posted in Books, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on September 7, 2019 by xi'an

Before returning a few older issues of Nature to the coffee room of the maths department, a quick look brought out the few following items of interests, besides the great cover above:

  • France showing the biggest decline in overal output among the top 10 countries in the Nature Index Annual Tables.
  • A tribune again the EU’s Plan S, towards funding (private) publishers directly from public (research) money. Why continuing to support commercial journals one way or another?!
  • A short debate on geo-engineering towards climate control, with the dire warning that “little is known about the consequences” [which could be further damaging the chances of human survival on this planet].
  • Another call for the accountability of companies designing AI towards fairness and unbiasedness [provided all agree on the meaning of these terms]
  • A study that argues that the obesity epidemics is more prevalent in rural than urban areas due to a higher recourse to junk food in the former.
  • A data mining venture in India to mine [not read] 73 million computerised journal articles, which is not yet clearly legal as the publishers object to it. Although the EU (and the UK) have laws authorising mining for non-commercial goals. (And India has looser regulations wrt copyright.)

Nature snapshots

Posted in Books, pictures with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 16, 2019 by xi'an

In this 6 June issue of Nature, which I read on my way to O’Bayes, an editorial on the scary move by the WHO to incorporate traditional Chinese medicine remedies in its classification as this includes drugs made from protected and endangered species and as such remedies have not been evidence tested. A news brief on India abandoning the requirement for PhD students to get a paper published prior to been awarded the degree, presumably much to the sorrow of predatory publishers. A delay to Plan S (a European project to make all funded research freely available) reported to 21 January 2021. A review of the latest and yet unpublished book by Neal Stephenson, Fall. Which I obviously ordered immediately! A paper in the British Journal of Anasthesia published along with an independent assessment of the same study (methods and results). Some letters protesting the “public’s phobia” induced by the series Chernobyl. Which recoups an email from one of my colleagues on the same complaining theme, since “only 20 deaths” can be attributed to the disaster with certainty! A revisit of the “cold fusion” with no evidence of the claimed phenomenon that led to a scientific outcry in 1989.

Bayesian Inference, at £1400 per chapter…

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on June 1, 2019 by xi'an

Another unsolicited email (“This is a friendly reminder that….”) from a UK operator called IntechOpen about publishing a chapter in an Open Access book about Bayesian Inference. And edited by Tang Niansheng. As detailed on the publisher page

“The aim of this book is to introduce the newly developed Bayesian methods, including Bayesian variable selection (e.g., fixed-dimensional data analysis and high/ultrahigh dimensional data analysis), Bayesian influence analysis (e.g., case deletion method and local influence analysis), Bayesian estimation and clustering methods (e.g., fixed dimensional data, high/ultrahigh dimensional data analysis, Bayesian network, and Bayesian clustering for big data), Bayesian hypothesis test including discrete and continuous random variables, variational Bayesian analysis and Bayesian clinical trials including design and dose-finding algorithm”

which is neither off the mark nor particularly innovative, as Bayesian (hand?)books go. With the slight impediment of a £1400 fee per chapter. Even at the current exchange rate, this is far from “free of charge” (which only applies to the book being “free to download, read and share”. (Given the on-going upheavals of UK politics, it may soon become affordable, though!)

your interesting published article “An introduction to the special issue “

Posted in Books, University life with tags , , , , , on April 1, 2019 by xi'an

In the flow of unsolicited emails interested in publishing my work, a contender for the top call is this one as of today from Computer Communication & Collaboration that cites my foreword to the special issue of Statistics & Computing published out of the talks at MCMski IV in Chamonix. In 2014. (According to the above site, the publisher of the journal, Better Advances Press, does not meet most of its criteria and identified as predatory by Beall’s List, as of January 3, 2017.)

Your interesting published article “An introduction to the special issue “Joint IMS-ISBA meeting – MCMSki 4″” drives me to call for new papers, on behalf of Computer Communication & Collaboration, which is an English quarterly journal in Canada.

This peer-reviewed journal focuses on smart internet and it welcomes papers on general theories of computer science, data communications, multimedia, social network, machine learning, data mining, intelligent collaboration and other relevant topics, both theoretical and empirical.

All papers should be written in professional English. The length of 2000-6000 words is suggested. We accept papers in MS-word or PDF format.

If your paper is qualified for publication after refereeing, it will be published within 2-4 months from the date of submission.

Thank you for your consideration.

Springer no more!

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on April 4, 2018 by xi'an

Just learned that, starting from tomorrow night, I will not have access to any of the Springer journals, as the negotiations between the consortium of French universities, research institutes, higher educations schools, and museums, failed. The commercial published refusing to stem the ever increasing fees, while happily taking in the fast increasing open access fees it pressures from authors, a unique example of triple taxation (researchers’ salaries, open access duties, and enormous non-negotiable subscription rates for the whole package of journals)… Following their German counterparts. Well, this is an opportunity for the boards of all these journals to withdraw and create the phantom version of their formal journal, evaluating and reviewing papers already available on arXiv! And I should definitely get my acts together, rise from my winter-is-coming lethargy, and launch PCI Comput Stat now!!!

your topic is so much impressive

Posted in University life with tags , , , on August 5, 2017 by xi'an

An email from a predatory “journal” I received last week end… With presumably all other speakers at MCqMC 2016. Items of [moderate] interest after looking at the “journal” website:

  • weird wording
  • no mention is made in the email of the $650 required for publish a paper
  • the Editorial Board is inexistent to the point there is no Editor and the page calls for applications

another bogus conference [AISTATS copycat]

Posted in University life with tags , , , , on July 27, 2016 by xi'an

wa

catz4Aki Vehtari spotted a bogus conference on human computer interaction and artificial intelligence that had copied the entire scientific committee of AISTATS 2016! The copy of the committee has now disappeared, but the list of topics is very similar to AISTATS 2016. (And Arthur Gretton is still the contact on this other site.) The conference was indicated as run by the Manchester International College, but this presumably is yet another usurpation of names… For instance, the conference is supposed to take place at a local hotel rather than in the College. And the reference has now disappeared. Almost simultaneously, we also received a request to edit the proceedings of this “conference” on Computers, which is a (free?) open access journal I know nothing about. (Except that it is listed as predatory by Jeffrey Beall.)

While it is of course very easy to set a webpage and a registration site for bogus conferences, it is sad that no action can be engaged against such fraudsters!