Archive for partial exchangeability

21w5107 [day 2]

Posted in Books, Mountains, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 1, 2021 by xi'an

After a rich and local (if freezing) dinner on a rooftop facing the baroque Oaxaca cathedral, and an early invigorating outdoor swim in my case!, the morning session was mostly on mixtures, with Helen Ogden exploring X validation for (estimating the number k of components for) finite mixtures, when using the likelihood as an objective function. I was unclear of the goal however when considering that the data supporting the study was Uniform (0,1), nothing like a mixture of Normal distributions. And about the consistency attached to the objective function. The session ended with Diana Cai presenting a counter-argument in the sense that she proved, along with Trevor Campbell and Tamara Broderick, that the posterior on k diverges to infinity with the number n of observations if a mixture model is misspecified for said data. Which does not come as a major surprise since there is no properly defined value of k when the data is not generated from the adopted mixture. I would love to see an extension to the case when the k component mixture contains a non-parametric component! In-between, Alexander Ly discussed Bayes factors for multiple datasets, with some asymptotics showing consistency for some (improper!) priors if one sample size grows to infinity. With actually attaining the same rate under both hypotheses. Luis Nieto-Barajas presented an approach on uncertainty assessment through KL divergence for random probability measures, which requires a calibration of the KL in this setting, as KL does not enjoy a uniform scale, and a prior on a Pólya tree. And Chris Holmes presented a recent work with Edwin Fong and Steven Walker on a prediction approach to Bayesian inference. Which I had had on my reading list for a while. It is a very original proposal where likelihoods and priors are replaced by the sequence of posterior predictives and only parameters of interest get simulated. The Bayesian flavour of the approach is delicate to assess though, albeit a form of non-parametric Bayesian perspective… (I still need to read the paper carefully.)

In the afternoon session, Judith Rousseau presented her recent foray in cut posteriors for semi-parametric HMMs. With interesting outcomes for efficiently estimating the transition matrix, the component distributions, and the smoothing distribution. I wonder at the connection with safe Bayes in that cut posteriors induce a loss of information. Sinead Williamson spoke on distributed MCMC for BNP. Going back at the “theme of the day”, namely clustering and finding the correct (?) number of clusters. With a collapsed versus uncollapsed division that reminded me of the marginal vs. conditional María Gil-Leyva discussed yesterday. Plus a decomposition of a random measure into a finite mixture and an infinite one that also reminded me of the morning talk of Diana Cai. (And making me wonder at the choice of the number K of terms in the finite part.) Michele Guindani spoke about clustering distributions (with firecrackers as a background!). Using the nDP mixture model, which was show to suffer from degeneracy (as discussed by Frederico Camerlenghi et al. in BA). The subtle difference stands in using the same (common) atoms in all random distributions at the top of the hierarchy, with independent weights. Making the partitions partially exchangeable. The approach relies on Sylvia’s generalised mixtures of finite mixtures. With interesting applications to microbiome and calcium imaging (including a mice brain in action!). And Giovanni Rebaudo presented a generalised notion of clustering aligned on a graph, with some observations located between the nodes corresponding to clusters. Represented as a random measure with common parameters for the clusters and separated parameters outside. Interestingly playing on random partitions, Pólya urns, and species sampling.

a pen for ABC

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 13, 2019 by xi'an

Among the flury of papers arXived around the ICML 2019 deadline, I read on my way back from Oxford a paper by Wiqvist et al. on learning summary statistics for ABC by neural nets. Pointing out at another recent paper by Jiang et al. (2017, Statistica Sinica) which constructed a neural network for predicting each component of the parameter vector based on the input (raw) data, as an automated non-parametric regression of sorts. Creel (2017) does the same but with summary statistics. The current paper builds up from Jiang et al. (2017), by adding the constraint that exchangeability and partial exchangeability features should be reflected by the neural net prediction function. With applications to Markovian models. Due to a factorisation theorem for d-block invariant models, the authors impose partial exchangeability for order d Markov models by combining two neural networks that end up satisfying this factorisation. The concept is exemplified for one-dimension g-and-k distributions, alpha-stable distributions, both of which are made of independent observations, and the AR(2) and MA(2) models, as in our 2012 ABC survey paper. Since the later is not Markovian the authors experiment with different orders and reach the conclusion that an order of 10 is most appropriate, although this may be impacted by being a ble to handle the true likelihood.

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