Archive for Peer Community

publish or perish [or move to .005]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , on October 24, 2017 by xi'an

A series of articles in the Sciences et Médecine part of Le Monde reproduced coverages found elsewhere on the debates running within the scientific community on improving the quality of scientific papers. Through reproducible experiments and conclusions. And on using new bounds for the p-value, the solution to all woes! The article borrows a lot from the Nature proposal [discussed quite a lot here in the past weeks] and does not provide particularly insightful views. It however contains a coverage (rightmost columns) on a peer community approach called PubPeer, which was launched by two neuroscientists, Brandon Stell and Boris Barbour, both at CNRS, towards sharing comments on published papers. Mostly to criticise the methodology used in these papers. Or to point out multiple usages of the same graphs. Or doctoring of pictures. In the vast majority of cases, the papers are in biology and the comments not addressed by the authors of the papers. (With this exception of a discussion of the Nature paper covering the call for new bounds on p-values. Nature paper that had the appealing feature of calling for an end to `one-size-fits-all’ thresholds.) Creating a platform for discussing papers from a journal is already hard enough (as shown with the closure of Series B’log!), hence running a global discussion forum for all journals sounds hard to manage and foster. By which I mean it is difficult to fathom the impact of the discussions on the published papers and the journals where they are published, given the reticence of said journals to engage into reassessments of published papers…

 

stop the rot!

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 26, 2017 by xi'an

Several entries in Nature this week about predatory journals. Both from Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. One emanates from the publication officer at the Institute, whose role is “dedicated to educating researchers and guiding them in their journal submission”. And telling the tale of a senior scientist finding out a paper submitted to a predatory journal and later rescinded was nonetheless published by the said journal. Which reminded me of a similar misadventure that occurred to me a few years ago. After having a discussion of an earlier paper therein rejected from The American Statistician, my PhD student Kaniav Kamary and I resubmitted it to the Journal of Applied & Computational Mathematics, from which I had received an email a few weeks earlier asking me in flowery terms for a paper. When the paper got accepted as such two days after submission, I got alarmed and realised this was a predatory journal, which title played with the quasi homonymous Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics (Elsevier) and International Journal of Applied and Computational Mathematics (Springer). Just like the authors in the above story, we wrote back to the editors, telling them we were rescinding our submission, but never got back any reply or request of copyright transfer. Instead, requests for (diminishing) payments were regularly sent to us, for almost a year, until they ceased. In the meanwhile, the paper had been posted on the “journal” website and no further email of ours, including some from our University legal officer, induced a reply or action from the journal…

The second article in Nature is from a group of epidemiologists at the same institute, producing statistics about biomedical publications in predatory journals (characterised as such by the defunct Beall blacklist). And being much more vehement about the danger represented by these journals, which “articles we examined were atrocious in terms of reporting”, and authors submitting to them, as unethical for wasting human and animal observations. The authors of this article identify thirteen characteristics for spotting predatory journals, the first one being “low article-processing fees”, our own misadventure being the opposite. And they ask for higher control and auditing from the funding institutions over their researchers… Besides adding an extra-layer to the bureaucracy, I fear this is rather naïve, as if the boundary between predatory and non-predatory journals was crystal clear, rather than a murky continuum. And putting the blame solely on the researchers rather than sharing it with institutions always eager to push their bibliometrics towards more automation of the assessment of their researchers.

and the travelling salesman is…

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , on July 21, 2017 by xi'an

Here is another attempt at using StippleGen on… Alan Turing‘s picture. My reason for attempting a travelling salesman rendering of this well-known picture towards creating a logo for PCI Comput Stats, the peer community project I am working on this summer. With the help of the originators of PCI Evol Biol.

exciting week[s]

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 27, 2017 by xi'an

The past week was quite exciting, despite the heat wave that hit Paris and kept me from sleeping and running! First, I made a two-day visit to Jean-Michel Marin in Montpellier, where we discussed the potential Peer Community In Computational Statistics (PCI Comput Stats) with the people behind PCI Evol Biol at INRA, Hopefully taking shape in the coming months! And went one evening through a few vineyards in Saint Christol with Jean-Michel and Arnaud. Including a long chat with the owner of Domaine Coste Moynier. [Whose domain includes the above parcel with views of Pic Saint-Loup.] And last but not least! some work planning about approximate MCMC.

On top of this, we submitted our paper on ABC with Wasserstein distances [to be arXived in an extended version in the coming weeks], our revised paper on ABC consistency thanks to highly constructive and comments from the editorial board, which induced a much improved version in my opinion, and we received a very positive return from JCGS for our paper on weak priors for mixtures! Next week should be exciting as well, with BNP 11 taking place in downtown Paris, at École Normale!!!

crowd-based peer review

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 20, 2017 by xi'an

In clear connection with my earlier post on Peer Community In… and my visit this week to Montpellier towards starting a Peer Community In Computational Statistics, I read a tribune in Nature (1 June, p.9) by the editor of Synlett, Benjamin List, describing an experiment conducted by this journal in chemical synthesis. The approach was to post (volunteered) submitted papers on a platform accessible to a list of 100 reviewers, nominated by the editorial board, who could anonymously comment on the papers and read others’ equally anonymous comments. With a 72 hours deadline! According to Benjamin List (and based on  a large dataset of … 10 papers!), the outcome of the experiment is one of better quality return than with traditional reviewing policies. While Peer Community In… does not work exactly this way, and does not aim at operating as a journal, it is exciting and encouraging to see such experiments unfold!