Archive for peer review

stop the rot!

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 26, 2017 by xi'an

Several entries in Nature this week about predatory journals. Both from Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. One emanates from the publication officer at the Institute, whose role is “dedicated to educating researchers and guiding them in their journal submission”. And telling the tale of a senior scientist finding out a paper submitted to a predatory journal and later rescinded was nonetheless published by the said journal. Which reminded me of a similar misadventure that occurred to me a few years ago. After having a discussion of an earlier paper therein rejected from The American Statistician, my PhD student Kaniav Kamary and I resubmitted it to the Journal of Applied & Computational Mathematics, from which I had received an email a few weeks earlier asking me in flowery terms for a paper. When the paper got accepted as such two days after submission, I got alarmed and realised this was a predatory journal, which title played with the quasi homonymous Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics (Elsevier) and International Journal of Applied and Computational Mathematics (Springer). Just like the authors in the above story, we wrote back to the editors, telling them we were rescinding our submission, but never got back any reply or request of copyright transfer. Instead, requests for (diminishing) payments were regularly sent to us, for almost a year, until they ceased. In the meanwhile, the paper had been posted on the “journal” website and no further email of ours, including some from our University legal officer, induced a reply or action from the journal…

The second article in Nature is from a group of epidemiologists at the same institute, producing statistics about biomedical publications in predatory journals (characterised as such by the defunct Beall blacklist). And being much more vehement about the danger represented by these journals, which “articles we examined were atrocious in terms of reporting”, and authors submitting to them, as unethical for wasting human and animal observations. The authors of this article identify thirteen characteristics for spotting predatory journals, the first one being “low article-processing fees”, our own misadventure being the opposite. And they ask for higher control and auditing from the funding institutions over their researchers… Besides adding an extra-layer to the bureaucracy, I fear this is rather naïve, as if the boundary between predatory and non-predatory journals was crystal clear, rather than a murky continuum. And putting the blame solely on the researchers rather than sharing it with institutions always eager to push their bibliometrics towards more automation of the assessment of their researchers.

crowd-based peer review

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 20, 2017 by xi'an

In clear connection with my earlier post on Peer Community In… and my visit this week to Montpellier towards starting a Peer Community In Computational Statistics, I read a tribune in Nature (1 June, p.9) by the editor of Synlett, Benjamin List, describing an experiment conducted by this journal in chemical synthesis. The approach was to post (volunteered) submitted papers on a platform accessible to a list of 100 reviewers, nominated by the editorial board, who could anonymously comment on the papers and read others’ equally anonymous comments. With a 72 hours deadline! According to Benjamin List (and based on  a large dataset of … 10 papers!), the outcome of the experiment is one of better quality return than with traditional reviewing policies. While Peer Community In… does not work exactly this way, and does not aim at operating as a journal, it is exciting and encouraging to see such experiments unfold!

peer community in evolutionary biology

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on May 18, 2017 by xi'an

My friends (and co-authors) from Montpellier pointed out the existence of PCI Evolutionary Biology, which is a preprint and postprint validation forum [so far only] in the field of Evolutionary Biology. Authors of a preprint or of a published paper request a recommendation from the forum. If someone from the board finds the paper of interest, this person initiates a quick refereeing process with one or two referees and returns a review to the authors, with possible requests for modification, and if the lead reviewer is happy with the new version, the link to the paper and the reviews are published on PCI Evol Biol, which thus gives a stamp of validation to the contents in the paper. The paper can then be submitted for publication in any journal, as can be seen from the papers in the list.

This sounds like a great initiative and since PCI is calling for little brothers and sisters to PCI Evol Biol, I think we should try to build its equivalent in Statistics or maybe just Computational Statistics.