Archive for Peter Green

Bayesian model selection without evidence

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on September 20, 2016 by xi'an

“The new method circumvents the challenges associated with accurate evidence calculations by computing posterior odds ratios using Bayesian parameter estimation”

One paper leading to another, I had a look at Hee et al. 2015 paper on Bayes factor estimation. The “novelty” stands in introducing the model index as an extra parameter in a single model encompassing all models under comparison, the “new” parameterisation being in (θ,n) rather than in θ. With the distinction that the parameter θ is now made of the union of all parameters across all models. Which reminds us very much of Carlin and Chib (1995) approach to the problem. (Peter Green in his Biometrika (1995) paper on reversible jump MCMC uses instead a direct sum of parameter spaces.) The authors indeed suggest simulating jointly (θ,n) in an MCMC or nested sampling scheme. Rather than being updated by arbitrary transforms as in Carlin and Chib (1995) the useless parameters from the other models are kept constant… The goal being to estimate P(n|D) the marginal posterior on the model index, aka the posterior probability of model n.

Now, I am quite not certain keeping the other parameter constants is a valid move: given a uniform prior on n and an equally uniform proposal, the acceptance probability simplifies into the regular Metropolis-Hastings ratio for model n. Hence the move is valid within model n. If not, I presume the previous pair (θ⁰,n⁰) is repeated. Wait!, actually, this is slightly more elaborate: if a new value of n, m, is proposed, then the acceptance ratio involves the posteriors for both n⁰ and m, possibly only the likelihoods when the proposal is the prior. So the move will directly depend on the likelihood ratio in this simplified case, which indicates the scheme could be correct after all. Except that this neglects the measure theoretic subtleties that led to reversible jump symmetry and hence makes me wonder. In other words, it follows exactly the same pattern as reversible jump without the constraints of the latter… Free lunch,  anyone?!

Overfitting Bayesian mixture models with an unknown number of components

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , on March 4, 2015 by xi'an

During my Czech vacations, Zoé van Havre, Nicole White, Judith Rousseau, and Kerrie Mengersen1 posted on arXiv a paper on overfitting mixture models to estimate the number of components. This is directly related with Judith and Kerrie’s 2011 paper and with Zoé’s PhD topic. The paper also returns to the vexing (?) issue of label switching! I very much like the paper and not only because the author are good friends!, but also because it brings a solution to an approach I briefly attempted with Marie-Anne Gruet in the early 1990’s, just before finding about the reversible jump MCMC algorithm of Peter Green at a workshop in Luminy and considering we were not going to “beat the competition”! Hence not publishing the output of our over-fitted Gibbs samplers that were nicely emptying extra components… It also brings a rebuke about a later assertion of mine’s at an ICMS workshop on mixtures, where I defended the notion that over-fitted mixtures could not be detected, a notion that was severely disputed by David McKay…

What is so fantastic in Rousseau and Mengersen (2011) is that a simple constraint on the Dirichlet prior on the mixture weights suffices to guarantee that asymptotically superfluous components will empty out and signal they are truly superfluous! The authors here cumulate the over-fitted mixture with a tempering strategy, which seems somewhat redundant, the number of extra components being a sort of temperature, but eliminates the need for fragile RJMCMC steps. Label switching is obviously even more of an issue with a larger number of components and identifying empty components seems to require a lack of label switching for some components to remain empty!

When reading through the paper, I came upon the condition that only the priors of the weights are allowed to vary between temperatures. Distinguishing the weights from the other parameters does make perfect sense, as some representations of a mixture work without those weights. Still I feel a bit uncertain about the fixed prior constraint, even though I can see the rationale in not allowing for complete freedom in picking those priors. More fundamentally, I am less and less happy with independent identical or exchangeable priors on the components.

Our own recent experience with almost zero weights mixtures (and with Judith, Kaniav, and Kerrie) suggests not using solely a Gibbs sampler there as it shows poor mixing. And even poorer label switching. The current paper does not seem to meet the same difficulties, maybe thanks to (prior) tempering.

The paper proposes a strategy called Zswitch to resolve label switching, which amounts to identify a MAP for each possible number of components and a subsequent relabelling. Even though I do not entirely understand the way the permutation is constructed. I wonder in particular at the cost of the relabelling.

Biometrika, volume 100

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 5, 2013 by xi'an

I had been privileged to have a look at a preliminary version of the now-published retrospective written by Mike Titterington on the 100 first issues of Biometrika (more exactly, “from volume 28 onwards“, as the title state). Mike was the dedicated editor of Biometrika for many years and edited a nice book for the 100th anniversary of the journal. He started from the 100th most highly cited papers within the journal to build a coherent chronological coverage. From a Bayesian perspective, this retrospective starts with Maurice Kendall trying to reconcile frequentists and non-frequentists in 1949, while having a hard time with fiducial statistics. Then Dennis Lindley makes it to the top 100 in 1957 with the Lindley-Jeffreys paradox. From 1958 till 1961, Darroch is quoted several times for his (fine) formalisation of the capture-recapture experiments we were to study much later (Biometrika, 1992) with Ed George… In the 1960’s, Bayesian papers became more visible, including Don Fraser (1961) and Arthur Dempster’ Demspter-Shafer theory of evidence, as well as George Box and co-authors (1965, 1968) and Arnold Zellner (1964). Keith Hastings’ 1970 paper stands as the fifth most highly cited paper, even though it was ignored for almost two decades. The number of Bayesian papers kept increasing. including Binder’s (1978) cluster estimation, Efron and Morris’ (1972) James-Stein estimators, and Efron and Thisted’s (1978) terrific evaluation of Shakespeare’s vocabulary. From then, the number of Bayesian papers gets too large to cover in its entirety. The 1980’s saw papers by Julian Besag (1977, 1989, 1989 with Peter Clifford, which was yet another precursor MCMC) and Luke Tierney’s work (1989) on Laplace approximation. Carter and Kohn’s (1994) MCMC algorithm on state space models made it to the top 40, while Peter Green’s (1995) reversible jump algorithm came close to Hastings’ (1970) record, being the 8th most highly cited paper. Since the more recent papers do not make it to the top 100 list, Mike Titterington’s coverage gets more exhaustive as the years draw near, with an almost complete coverage for the final years. Overall, a fascinating journey through the years and the reasons why Biometrika is such a great journal and constantly so.