Archive for posterior predictive

priors without likelihoods are like sloths without…

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 11, 2017 by xi'an

“The idea of building priors that generate reasonable data may seem like an unusual idea…”

Andrew, Dan, and Michael arXived a opinion piece last week entitled “The prior can generally only be understood in the context of the likelihood”. Which connects to the earlier Read Paper of Gelman and Hennig I discussed last year. I cannot state strong disagreement with the positions taken in this piece, actually, in that I do not think prior distributions ever occur as a given but are rather chosen as a reference measure to probabilise the parameter space and eventually prioritise regions over others. If anything I find myself even further on the prior agnosticism gradation.  (Of course, this lack of disagreement applies to the likelihood understood as a function of both the data and the parameter, rather than of the parameter only, conditional on the data. Priors cannot be depending on the data without incurring disastrous consequences!)

“…it contradicts the conceptual principle that the prior distribution should convey only information that is available before the data have been collected.”

The first example is somewhat disappointing in that it revolves as so many Bayesian textbooks (since Laplace!) around the [sex ratio] Binomial probability parameter and concludes at the strong or long-lasting impact of the Uniform prior. I do not see much of a contradiction between the use of a Uniform prior and the collection of prior information, if only because there is not standardised way to transfer prior information into prior construction. And more fundamentally because a parameter rarely makes sense by itself, alone, without a model that relates it to potential data. As for instance in a regression model. More, following my epiphany of last semester, about the relativity of the prior, I see no damage in the prior being relevant, as I only attach a relative meaning to statements based on the posterior. Rather than trying to limit the impact of a prior, we should rather build assessment tools to measure this impact, for instance by prior predictive simulations. And this is where I come to quite agree with the authors.

“…non-identifiabilities, and near nonidentifiabilites, of complex models can lead to unexpected amounts of weight being given to certain aspects of the prior.”

Another rather straightforward remark is that non-identifiable models see the impact of a prior remain as the sample size grows. And I still see no issue with this fact in a relative approach. When the authors mention (p.7) that purely mathematical priors perform more poorly than weakly informative priors it is hard to see what they mean by this “performance”.

“…judge a prior by examining the data generating processes it favors and disfavors.”

Besides those points, I completely agree with them about the fundamental relevance of the prior as a generative process, only when the likelihood becomes available. And simulatable. (This point is found in many references, including our response to the American Statistician paper Hidden dangers of specifying noninformative priors, with Kaniav Kamary. With the same illustration on a logistic regression.) I also agree to their criticism of the marginal likelihood and Bayes factors as being so strongly impacted by the choice of a prior, if treated as absolute quantities. I also if more reluctantly and somewhat heretically see a point in using the posterior predictive for assessing whether a prior is relevant for the data at hand. At least at a conceptual level. I am however less certain about how to handle improper priors based on their recommendations. In conclusion, it would be great to see one [or more] of the authors at O-Bayes 2017 in Austin as I am sure it would stem nice discussions there! (And by the way I have no prior idea on how to conclude the comparison in the title!)

Goodness-of-fit statistics for ABC

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on February 1, 2016 by xi'an

“Posterior predictive checks are well-suited to Approximate Bayesian Computation”

Louisiane Lemaire and her coauthors from Grenoble have just arXived a new paper on designing a goodness-of-fit statistic from ABC outputs. The statistic is constructed from a comparison between the observed (summary) statistics and replicated summary statistics generated from the posterior predictive distribution. This is a major difference with the standard ABC distance, when the replicated summary statistics are generated from the prior predictive distribution. The core of the paper is about calibrating a posterior predictive p-value derived from this distance, since it is not properly calibrated in the frequentist sense that it is not uniformly distributed “under the null”. A point I discussed in an ‘Og entry about Andrews’ book a few years ago.

The paper opposes the average distance between ABC acceptable summary statistics and the observed realisation to the average distance between ABC posterior predictive simulations of summary statistics and the observed realisation. In the simplest case (e.g., without a post-processing of the summary statistics), the main difference between both average distances is that the summary statistics are used twice in the first version: first to select the acceptable values of the parameters and a second time for the average distance. Which makes it biased downwards. The second version is more computationally demanding, especially when deriving the associated p-value. It however produces a higher power under the alternative. Obviously depending on how the alternative is defined, since goodness-of-fit is only related to the null, i.e., to a specific model.

From a general perspective, I do not completely agree with the conclusions of the paper in that (a) this is a frequentist assessment and partakes in the shortcomings of p-values and (b) the choice of summary statistics has a huge impact on the decision about the fit since hardly varying statistics are more likely to lead to a good fit than appropriately varying ones.

a unified treatment of predictive model comparison

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 16, 2015 by xi'an

“Applying various approximation strategies to the relative predictive performance derived from predictive distributions in frequentist and Bayesian inference yields many of the model comparison techniques ubiquitous in practice, from predictive log loss cross validation to the Bayesian evidence and Bayesian information criteria.”

Michael Betancourt (Warwick) just arXived a paper formalising predictive model comparison in an almost Bourbakian sense! Meaning that he adopts therein a very general representation of the issue, with minimal assumptions on the data generating process (excluding a specific metric and obviously the choice of a testing statistic). He opts for an M-open perspective, meaning that this generating process stands outside the hypothetical statistical model or, in Lindley’s terms, a small world. Within this paradigm, the only way to assess the fit of a model seems to be through the predictive performances of that model. Using for instance an f-divergence like the Kullback-Leibler divergence, based on the true generated process as the reference. I think this however puts a restriction on the choice of small worlds as the probability measure on that small world has to be absolutely continuous wrt the true data generating process for the distance to be finite. While there are arguments in favour of absolutely continuous small worlds, this assumes a knowledge about the true process that we simply cannot gather. Ignoring this difficulty, a relative Kullback-Leibler divergence can be defined in terms of an almost arbitrary reference measure. But as it still relies on the true measure, its evaluation proceeds via cross-validation “tricks” like jackknife and bootstrap. However, on the Bayesian side, using the prior predictive links the Kullback-Leibler divergence with the marginal likelihood. And Michael argues further that the posterior predictive can be seen as the unifying tool behind information criteria like DIC and WAIC (widely applicable information criterion). Which does not convince me towards the utility of those criteria as model selection tools, as there is too much freedom in the way approximations are used and a potential for using the data several times.

Posterior predictive p-values and the convex order

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on December 22, 2014 by xi'an

Patrick Rubin-Delanchy and Daniel Lawson [of Warhammer fame!] recently arXived a paper we had discussed with Patrick when he visited Andrew and I last summer in Paris. The topic is the evaluation of the posterior predictive probability of a larger discrepancy between data and model

\mathbb{P}\left( f(X|\theta)\ge f(x^\text{obs}|\theta) \,|\,x^\text{obs} \right)

which acts like a Bayesian p-value of sorts. I discussed several times the reservations I have about this notion on this blog… Including running one experiment on the uniformity of the ppp while in Duke last year. One item of those reservations being that it evaluates the posterior probability of an event that does not exist a priori. Which is somewhat connected to the issue of using the data “twice”.

“A posterior predictive p-value has a transparent Bayesian interpretation.”

Another item that was suggested [to me] in the current paper is the difficulty in defining the posterior predictive (pp), for instance by including latent variables

\mathbb{P}\left( f(X,Z|\theta)\ge f(x^\text{obs},Z^\text{obs}|\theta) \,|\,x^\text{obs} \right)\,,

which reminds me of the multiple possible avatars of the BIC criterion. The question addressed by Rubin-Delanchy and Lawson is how far from the uniform distribution stands this pp when the model is correct. The main result of their paper is that any sub-uniform distribution can be expressed as a particular posterior predictive. The authors also exhibit the distribution that achieves the bound produced by Xiao-Li Meng, Namely that

\mathbb{P}(P\le \alpha) \le 2\alpha

where P is the above (top) probability. (Hence it is uniform up to a factor 2!) Obviously, the proximity with the upper bound only occurs in a limited number of cases that do not validate the overall use of the ppp. But this is certainly a nice piece of theoretical work.

reliable ABC model choice via random forests

Posted in pictures, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on October 29, 2014 by xi'an

human_ldaAfter a somewhat prolonged labour (!), we have at last completed our paper on ABC model choice with random forests and submitted it to PNAS for possible publication. While the paper is entirely methodological, the primary domain of application of ABC model choice methods remains population genetics and the diffusion of this new methodology to the users is thus more likely via a media like PNAS than via a machine learning or statistics journal.

When compared with our recent update of the arXived paper, there is not much different in contents, as it is mostly an issue of fitting the PNAS publication canons. (Which makes the paper less readable in the posted version [in my opinion!] as it needs to fit the main document within the compulsory six pages, relegated part of the experiments and of the explanations to the Supplementary Information section.)

posterior predictive distributions of Bayes factors

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics with tags , , , on October 8, 2014 by xi'an

Once a Bayes factor B(y)  is computed, one needs to assess its strength. As repeated many times here, Jeffreys’ scale has no validation whatsoever, it is simply a division of the (1,∞) range into regions of convenience. Following earlier proposals in the literature (Box, 1980; García-Donato and Chen, 2005; Geweke and Amisano, 2008), an evaluation of this strength within the issue at stake, i.e. the comparison of two models, can be based on the predictive distribution. While most authors (like García-Donato and Chen) consider the prior predictive, I think using the posterior predictive distribution is more relevant since

  1. it exploits the information contained in the data y, thus concentrates on a region of relevance in the parameter space(s), which is especially interesting in weakly informative settings (even though we should abstain from testing in those cases, dixit Andrew);
  2. it reproduces the behaviour of the Bayes factor B(x) for values x of the observation similar to the original observation y;
  3. it does not hide issues of indeterminacy linked with improper priors: the Bayes factor B(x) remains indeterminate, even with a well-defined predictive;
  4. it does not separate between errors of type I and errors of type II but instead uses the natural summary provided by the Bayesian analysis, namely the predictive distribution π(x|y);
  5. as long as the evaluation is not used to reach a decision, there is no issue of “using the data twice”, we are simply producing an estimator of the posterior loss, for instance the (posterior) probability of selecting the wrong model. The Bayes factor B(x) is thus functionally  independent of y, while x is probabilistically dependent on y.

Note that, even though probabilities of errors of type I and errors of type II can be computed, they fail to account for the posterior probabilities of both models. (This is the delicate issue with the solution of García-Donato and Chen.) Another nice feature is that the predictive distribution of the Bayes factor can be computed even in complex settings where ABC needs to be used.

ABC model choice via random forests [expanded]

Posted in Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 1, 2014 by xi'an

outofAfToday, we arXived a second version of our paper on ABC model choice with random forests. Or maybe [A]BC model choice with random forests. Since the random forest is built on a simulation from the prior predictive and no further approximation is used in the process. Except for the computation of the posterior [predictive] error rate. The update wrt the earlier version is that we ran massive simulations throughout the summer, on existing and new datasets. In particular, we have included a Human dataset extracted from the 1000 Genomes Project. Made of 51,250 SNP loci. While this dataset is not used to test new evolution scenarios, we compared six out-of-Africa scenarios, with a possible admixture for Americans of African ancestry. The scenario selected by a random forest procedure posits a single out-of-Africa colonization event with a secondary split into a European and an East Asian population lineages, and a recent genetic admixture between African and European lineages, for Americans of African origin. The procedure reported a high level of confidence since the estimated posterior error rate is equal to zero. The SNP loci were carefully selected using the following criteria: (i) all individuals have a genotype characterized by a quality score (GQ)>10, (ii) polymorphism is present in at least one of the individuals in order to fit the SNP simulation algorithm of Hudson (2002) used in DIYABC V2 (Cornuet et al., 2014), (iii) the minimum distance between two consecutive SNPs is 1 kb in order to minimize linkage disequilibrium between SNP, and (iv) SNP loci showing significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at a 1% threshold in at least one of the four populations have been removed.

In terms of random forests, we optimised the size of the bootstrap subsamples for all of our datasets. While this optimisation requires extra computing time, it is negligible when compared with the enormous time taken by a logistic regression, which is [yet] the standard ABC model choice approach. Now the data has been gathered, it is only a matter of days before we can send the paper to a journal