Archive for R

Le Monde puzzle [#1104]

Posted in Kids, R with tags , , , , on June 18, 2019 by xi'an

A palindromic Le Monde mathematical puzzle:

In a monetary system where all palindromic amounts between 1 and 10⁸ have a coin, find the numbers less than 10³ that cannot be paid with less than three coins. Find if 20,191,104 can be paid with two coins. Similarly, find if 11,042,019 can be paid with two or three coins.

Which can be solved in a few lines of R code:

coin=sort(c(1:9,(1:9)*11,outer(1:9*101,(0:9)*10,"+")))
amounz=sort(unique(c(coin,as.vector(outer(coin,coin,"+")))))
amounz=amounz[amounz<1e3]

and produces 9 amounts that cannot be paid with one or two coins.

21 32 43 54 65 76 87 98 201

It is also easy to check that three coins are enough to cover all amounts below 10³. For the second question, starting with n¹=20,188,102,  a simple downward search of palindromic pairs (n¹,n²) such that n¹+n²=20,188,102 led to n¹=16,755,761 and n²=3,435,343. And starting with 11,033,011, the same search does not produce any solution, while there are three coins such that n¹+n²+n³=11,042,019, for instance n¹=11,022,011, n²=20,002, and n³=6.

another attempt at code golf

Posted in Books, Kids, R with tags , , , on June 12, 2019 by xi'an

I had another lazy weekend go at code golf, trying to code in the most condensed way the following task. Provided with a square matrix A of positive integers, keep iterating the steps

  • take the highest square 𝑥² in A.
  • find the smallest adjacent neighbour 𝑛
  • replace with x and n with nx

until no square is left (with neighbour defined as either horizontally or vertically and without wrapping around). While I managed a 217 bytes solution, compared with Robin’s 179b improvement, which remains surprising readable!, the puzzle offers two further questions:

  1. is there a non-iterative way to find the final matrix B?
  2. the puzzle assumes that A satisfies that at each step, the highest square and the smallest neighbour n will be unique, and that the sequence will not repeat forever. Is there a fool-proof way to check this is the case?

 

biased sample!

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2019 by xi'an

A chance occurrence led me to this thread on R-devel about R sample function generating a bias by taking the integer part of the continuous uniform generator… And then to the note by Kellie Ottoboni and Philip Stark analysing the reason, namely the fact that R uniform [0,1) pseudo-random generator is not perfectly continuously uniform but discrete, by the nature of numbers on a computer. Knuth (1997) showed that in this case the range of probabilities is larger than (1,1), the largest range being (1,1.03). As noted in the note, exploiting directly the pseudo-random bits of the pseudo-random generator. Shocking, isn’t it!  A fast and bias-free alternative suggested by Lemire is available as dqsample::sample

As an update of June 2019, sample is now fixed.

an attempt at code golf

Posted in Kids, R with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 15, 2019 by xi'an

Having discovered codegolf on Stack Exchange a few weeks ago, I spotted a few interesting puzzles since then but only got the opportunity at a try over a quiet and rainy weekend (and Robin being on vacation)! The challenge was to write an R code for deciding whether or not a given integer n is congruent or not, when congruent means that it is the surface of a rectangle triangle with all three sides rational. The question included a pointer to the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture as a mean to check congruence although the real solution was provided by Tunnell’s Theorem, which states that n is congruent if and only if the number of integer solutions to 2x²+y²+8z²=n is twice as much as the number of integer solutions to 2x²+y²+32z²=n if n is odd and  the number of integer solutions to 8x²+y²+16z²=n is twice as much as the number of integer solutions to 8x²+y²+64z²=n if n is even. Although this is only true for squared-free integers. (I actually spent more time on figuring out the exact wording of the theorem than on optimising the R code!)

My original solution

p=function(n){
 for (i in(n:2)^2)if(n%%i<1)n=n/i
 if(n%%2){d=8;f=2;g=16}else{d=2;f=1;g=8}
 A=0;b=(-n:n)^2
 for(x in d*b)for(y in x+f*b)for(z in g*b)
  A=A+(y+z==n)-2*(y+4*z==n)
 A==0}

was quite naïve, as shown by the subsequent improvements by senior players, like the final (?) version of Guiseppe:

function(n){b=(-n:n)^2
for(i in b[b>0])n=n/i^(!n%%i)
P=2^(n%%2)
o=outer
!sum(!o(y<-o(8/P*b,2*b,"+")/P-n,z<-16/P*b,"+"),-2*!o(y,4*z,"+"))}

exhibiting a load of code golf tricks, from using an anonymous function to renaming functions with a single letter, to switching from integers to booleans and back with the exclamation mark.

chance call for book reviewers

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , on May 14, 2019 by xi'an

Since I have been unable to find local reviewers for my CHANCE review column of the above recent CRC Press books, namely

I am calling for volunteers among ‘Og’s readers. Please contact me if interested.

a perfectly normally distributed sample

Posted in R, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , on May 9, 2019 by xi'an

When I saw this title on R-bloggers, I was wondering how “more perfect” a Normal sample could be when compared with the outcome of rnorm(n). Hence went checking the original blog on bayestestR in search of more information. Which was stating nothing more than how to generate a sample is perfectly normal by using the rnorm_perfect function. Still unsure of the meaning, I contacted one of the contributors who replied very quickly

…that’s actually a good question. I would say an empirical sample having characteristics as close as possible to a cannonic gaussian distribution.
and again leaving me hungering for more details. I thus downloaded the package bayestestR and opened the rnorm_perfect function. Which is simply the sequence of n-quantiles
stats::qnorm(seq(1/n, 1 – 1/n, length.out = n), mean, sd)
which I would definitely not call a sample as it has nothing random. And perfect?! Not really, unless one associates randomness and imperfection.

Le Monde puzzle [#1099]

Posted in Books, Kids, R with tags , , , , , on April 28, 2019 by xi'an

A simple 2×2 Le Monde mathematical puzzle:

Arielle and Brandwein play a game out of two distinct even integers between 1500 and 2500,  and y. Providing one another with either the pair (x/2,y+x/2) or the pair (x+y/2,y/2) until they run out of even possibilities or exceed 6 rounds. When x=2304, what is the value of y that makes Brandwein win?

Which I solved by a recursive function (under the constraint of a maximum of 11 levels of recursion):

nezt=function(x,y,i=1){
  if ((i>11)||((is.odd(x)&is.odd(y)))){ return(-1)
  }else{
    z=-1
    if (is.even(x)) z=-nezt(x/2,y+x/2,i+1)
    if (is.even(y)) z=max(z,-nezt(y/2,x+y/2,i+1))
    return(z)}}

and checking all values of y between 1500 and 2500 when x=2304, which produces y=1792 as the only value when Arielle loses. The reason behind (?) is that both 2304 and 1792 are divisible by 2⁸, which means no strategy avoids reaching stalemate after 8 steps, when it is Arielle’s turn to play.