Archive for Rebus

blood hunt [book review]

Posted in Books, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 28, 2018 by xi'an

I realised just lately that I had not read the early non-Rebus novels of Ian Rankin (written as Jack Harvey) and thus ordered cheap used copies of three of these, which waited for me on my (new) desk when I returned to Warwick. The first one I tried is Blood Hunt, a 1995 conspiracy novel that is so full of clichés that it feels like several volumes long..! I almost left it in the common room before heading back to Paris! To wit, a second-rate journalist is after a big international chemical corporation that is poisoning the entire planet. As he gets too close to exposing the truth, he is assassinated in the US. Fortunately, his brother is a super-hero, an ex SAS soldier, living on one of the Outer Hebrides in massive isolation and getting a living [while remaining very fit] by training “weekend soldiers”. If this sounds like too much of a coincidence, the story gets downhill from there and the suspension of belief gets so heavy that one could walk on it all the way from Uist to Skye! With the main character achieving on his own more than a dozen Jason Bourne, despite a horde of killers set after him. The only thing of interest in the book is how old it sounds, being set before 1995, with hardly any cell phone available and money running out of call cards. The action taking place in France is rather well documented, including a visit to Orly airport, except for the unfortunate mention that entries are found both left and right on the Périphérique! It is fortunate that Rankin chose to adopt a highly different perspective on a similar character when writing Knots & Crosses and creating Rebus, as I would not have possibly continued reading this type of books! And be waiting for getting my hands on the novel House of Lies, which I saw in the airport when leaving.

the naming of the Dead [book review]

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 21, 2018 by xi'an

When leaving for ISBA 2018 in Edinburgh, I picked a Rebus book in my bookshelf,  book that happened to be The Naming of the Dead, which was published in 2006 and takes place in 2005, during the week of the G8 summit in Scotland and of the London Underground bombings. Quite a major week in recent British history! But also for Rebus and his colleague Siobhan Clarke, who investigate a sacrificial murder close, too close, to the location of the G8 meeting and as a result collide with superiors, secret services, protesters, politicians, and executives, including a brush with Bush ending up with his bike accident at Gleneagles, and ending up with both of them suspended from the force. But more than this close connection with true events in and around Edinburgh, the book is a masterpiece, maybe Rankin’s best, because of the depiction of the characters, who have even more depth and dimensions than in the other novels.  And for the analysis of the events of that week. Having been in Edinburgh at the time I started re-reading the book also made the description of the city much more vivid and realistic, as I could locate and sometimes remember some places. (The conclusion of some subplots may be less realistic than I would like them to be, but this is of very minor relevance.)

even dogs in the wild

Posted in Books, Mountains, Travel with tags , , , , , , , on August 10, 2016 by xi'an

A new Rankin, a new Rebus! (New as in 2015 since I waited to buy the paperback version.) Sounds like Ian Rankin cannot let his favourite character rest for his retirement and hence set in back into action, along with the new Malcom Fox [working in the Complaints] and most major characters of the Rebus series. Including the unbreakable villain, Big Ger Cafferty. This as classical as you get, borrows from half a dozen former Rebus novels, not to mention this neo-Holmes novel I reviewed a while ago. But it is gritty, deadly efficient and captivating. I read the book within a few days from returning from Warwick.

About the title, this is a song by The Associates that plays a role in the book. I did not this band, but looking for it got me to a clip that used an excerpt from the Night of the Hunter. Fantastic movie, one of my favourites.

Saints of the Shadow Bible [book review]

Posted in Books, Travel with tags , , , , , on June 14, 2014 by xi'an

The saints of the shadow Bible following me
From bar to bar to eternity’
Jackie Leven

For once, I read my Rankin in Edinburgh, the very place where it takes place! (Somewhere in the book, Rebus acknowledge he never left Scotland. Which does not sound coherent with trips to London in earlier books… Like Tooth and Nails.) It makes the lecture much more complete, as I could picture some of the places and partly follow Rebus whereabouts within the town… The title of the book is taken from a song of Jackie Leven, a reminder that music is always an essential element in Rankin’s book, as Rebus’ tastes seem to mimic Rankin’s (or vice-versa). A definitely great title… And great cover.

Saints of the Shadow (Bible) is as usual always in tune with the current events in Scotland, from the campaigns for and against independence, to the roadwork for the new tram (which opened two days prior to my arrival in the city). Reminding me of Set in Darkness, set around the building of the then new Scottish parliament. This book is a good serving of Rebus, albeit in a sort of schadenfreunde way, as the (DI demoted to DS) Rebus is irresistibly getting close to retirement, cannot fight or drink so much or even impose his views upon his colleagues, even the most inclined towards him… So (spoiler!) the fight between Rebus and Fox, forced to work together, that I was expecting does not really take place. On the opposite, the earlier attempts of Fox to frame Rebus for his “bad-cop” attitude have vanished and (re-spoiler!) Rebus is central to framing some of his earliest colleagues from Summerhall, even though the book maintains the ambiguity for a long while. As often in detective stories, too many coincidences mar the credibility of the story, which is centred around a few characters and with much less of a societal or political framework than in earlier volumes. Maybe the most interesting character in Saints of the Shadow (Bible) is Siobhan Clarke, as she is growing in stature and authority, breaking the close partnership with Rebus while preserving the deep friendship. (As mentioned in the previous review, I do think Rankin should “finish” Rebus’ cycle and move to another theme and style, but, provisional on this, an enjoyable read completing “the” Scottish experience!))

no Complaints [book review]

Posted in Books with tags , , , , , on January 18, 2014 by xi'an

Another Rankin! In the Complaints series: the main character is Malcom Fox, inspector at the “Complaints and Conduct Department”, investigating a case of corruption within the Force on the north side of the Forth, in Fife. Rankin builds on the history of Scottish violent nationalist groups in the 80’s to deliver a very convincing story, mixing as usual the unorthodox methods of an investigator with his personal life. Even though some tie-ins are a wee bit unrealistic and I do not buy the final  (major) scene, I enjoyed reading the book over two or three days (between Chamonix, Geneva and Paris). Maybe due to the novelty of the character, there is no feeling of repetitiveness in this instalment. And the background is definitely interesting, relating the older SNP with violent splint groups at a time when Scottish independence was beyond the realm of the possible. I am now looking forward the next instalment, Saints of the Shadow Bible, where Fox and Rebus share the scene….

standing in another man’s grave

Posted in Books, Mountains, Travel with tags , , , , , , on July 13, 2013 by xi'an

“Just another night when he would not quite make it as far as the bedroom.” Standing in another man’s grave

Rebus is back indeed! When my friend Arnaud told me there was a new Rebus, I could not believe it: I thought Rankin had stopped the series with Rebus’ retirement, and one of the best possible endings (Rebus resuscitating his nemesis, Cafferty, and the superb title of Exit Music) to the series. Now, a new novel has appeared, Standing in another man’s grave, signifying Rebus return on the literary scene (and on the Scottish sleuthing scene as well).

“It’s an odd little country, this, isn’t it? I just mean it’s hard to fathom sometimes. I’ve lived here most of my life and I still don’t understand the place.” Standing in another man’s grave

So, a few years after his retirement (and a few years after the ‘last’ novel), Rebus reappears, as a civil assistant to a jeopardised cold case unit in Edinburgh. Unsurprisingly, Rebus cannot stay put and starts participating in a police investigation about the current disappearance of a young girl. With a possible link with earlier disappearances along the A9 road from Perth to Inverness… (A road with a surprising number of Scotch distilleries along the way, but this is a false trail!)

“A nation of 5 million huddled together as if cowed by the elements and the immensity of the landscape surrounding them, clinging to notions of community and shared history.” Standing in another man’s grave

Pretty soon, Rebus takes over the enquiry and without much backup (except from his former colleague Siobhan) figures out most of the clues leading to the thread common to those young girl disappearances. Pushing towards the resolution with means as grey and borderline as usual. Since part of the book is about Rebus trying to reapply for police work thanks to a new law and the Complaints inspector Malcom Fox is trying to prevent this, the next book (as there will be a next book!) may see Rebus in more trouble.

“Rebus began to wonder if he’d ever been further from a pub in his life.” Standing in another man’s grave

This is Rebus’ Rankin back to life and still… I had the definitive impression that Rebus had gotten much older than the few years since his “retirement”. The story starts as if he had lost all contact with former colleagues and only kept in touch with retirees and dead policemen… Even the early dialogues with Siobhan sound contrived. This may actually be intentional. The story itself has nice sides (like the use of Twitter and Facebook by young officers or the elimination of the catalyst case that started the whole story), but the resolution requires too much of a suspension of disbelief. Too many drinks. Too much driving (even though all those names of towns reminded me of places I visited or wanted to visit in Scotland). Nonetheless enjoyable and a page-turner and paving the way to The Saints of the Shadow Bible… With Scottish independence looming in the back!

Timi nornarinnar

Posted in Books with tags , , , on February 26, 2011 by xi'an

I read this mystery by Árni Thórarinsson over last trips to both Montpellier and València. It has been translated into French (Le Temps de la Sorcière) but apparently not into English… As the more famous Indridason I read last summer en route to Vancouver, Timi nornarinnar takes place in contemporary Iceland and brings a similar reflection on the depressed state of (most) Icelandic youths. and the challenges posed by immigration and globalisation… The main investigator in the novel is a now abstinent ex-alcoholic reporter sent to the North as a penance and somehow compelled to solve the mystery of a young actor’s murder. The whole story revolves around a play that should have taken place at the local school of Loftur the Sorcerer (Galdra Loftr) by Jöhan Sigurjönson, whose synopsis seems close to Wilde’s Dorian Gray… The crime elucidation is in the end  and as often less important than the description of the Icelandic society, especially because the solution to the murder is far from convincing. The reporter is sometimes hillarious, often unbearable, and overall unrealistic, but this makes a good read nonetheless, thanks to the secondary characters. (It is easy to find links with Rankin’s Rebus, especially through the relation with the reporter’s daughter and the dependence on alcohol. The subplot about the parakeet is highly silly, though, be warned!)