Archive for reversibility

non-reversibility in discrete spaces

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 3, 2020 by xi'an

Following a recent JASA paper by Giacomo Zanella (which I have not yet read but is discussed on this blog), Sam Power and Jacob Goldman have recently arXived a paper on Accelerated sampling on discrete spaces with non-reversible Markov processes, where they use continuous-time, non-reversible algorithms à la PDMP, even though differential equations do not exist on discrete spaces. More specifically, they devise discrete versions of the coordinate sampler and of the Zig-Zag sampler, using Markov jump processes instead of differential equations, with detailed balance on the jump rate rather than the Markov kernel. A use of jump processes originating at least from Peskun (1973) and connected with MCMC algorithms in Matthew Stephens‘ 1999 PhD thesis. A neat thing about discrete settings is that the jump process can be implemented with no discretisation! However, as we noticed when working on birth-and-death processes with Olivier Cappé and Tobias Rydèn, there is a potential for disastrous implementation if an infinite sequence of instantaneous moves (out of zero probability states) is proposed.

The authors make the further assumption(s) that the discrete space is endowed with a graphical structure with a group G acting upon this graph, with an involution keeping the target (or a completion of the original target) invariant. In this framework, reversibility amounts to repeatedly using (group) generators þ with a low order (as in Bayesian variable selection, binary spin systems, where þ.þ=id, and other permutation problems), since they bring the chain back to its starting point. Their first sampler is called a Tabu sampler for avoiding such behaviour, forcing the next step to use other generators þ in the generator set Þ thanks to a binary auxiliary variable that partitions Þ into forward vs backward moves. For high order generators, the discrete coordinate and Zig-Zag samplers are instead repeatedly using the same generator (although it is unclear to me why this is beneficial, given that neither graph nor generator is not necessarily linked with the target). With the coordinate sampler being again much cheaper since it only looks at one direction in the generator group.

The paper contains a range of comparisons with (only) Zanella’s sampler, some presenting heavy gains in terms of ESS. Including one on hundreds of sensors in a football stadium. As I am not particularly familiar with these examples, except for the Bayesian variable selection one, I found it rather hard to determine whether or not the compared samplers were indeed exploring the entirety of the (highly complex and highly dimensional) target. The collection of examples is however quite rich and support the use of such non-reversible schemes. It may also be that the discrete nature of the target could facilitate the theoretical study of their convergence properties.

an independent sampler that maximizes the acceptance rate of the MH algorithm

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 3, 2019 by xi'an

An ICLR 2019 paper by Neklyudov, Egorov and Vetrov on an optimal choice of the proposal in an independent Metropolis algorithm I discovered via an X validated question. Namely whether or not the expected Metropolis-Hastings acceptance ratio is always one (which it is not when the support of the proposal is restricted). The paper mentions the domination of the Accept-Reject algorithm by the associated independent Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, which has actually been stated in our Monte Carlo Statistical Methods (1999, Lemma 6.3.2) and may prove even older. The authors also note that the expected acceptance probability is equal to one minus the total variation distance between the joint defined as target x Metropolis-Hastings proposal distribution and its time-reversed version. Which seems to suffer from the same difficulty as the one mentioned in the X validated question. Namely that it only holds when the support of the Metropolis-Hastings proposal is at least the support of the target (or else when the support of the joint defined as target x Metropolis-Hastings proposal distribution is somewhat symmetric. Replacing total variation with Kullback-Leibler then leads to a manageable optimisation target if the proposal is a parameterised independent distribution. With a GAN version when the proposal is not explicitly available. I find it rather strange that one still seeks independent proposals for running Metropolis-Hastings algorithms as the result will depend on the family of proposals considered and as performances will deteriorate with dimension (the authors mention a 10% acceptance rate, which sounds quite low). [As an aside, ICLR 2020 will take part in Addis Abeba next April.]

MCMC importance samplers for intractable likelihoods

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 3, 2019 by xi'an

Jordan Franks just posted on arXiv his PhD dissertation at the University of Jyväskylä, where he discuses several of his works:

  1. M. Vihola, J. Helske, and J. Franks. Importance sampling type estimators based on approximate marginal MCMC. Preprint arXiv:1609.02541v5, 2016.
  2. J. Franks and M. Vihola. Importance sampling correction versus standard averages of reversible MCMCs in terms of the asymptotic variance. Preprint arXiv:1706.09873v4, 2017.
  3. J. Franks, A. Jasra, K. J. H. Law and M. Vihola.Unbiased inference for discretely observed hidden Markov model diffusions. Preprint arXiv:1807.10259v4, 2018.
  4. M. Vihola and J. Franks. On the use of ABC-MCMC with inflated tolerance and post-correction. Preprint arXiv:1902.00412, 2019

focusing on accelerated approximate MCMC (in the sense of pseudo-marginal MCMC) and delayed acceptance (as in our recently accepted paper). Comparing delayed acceptance with MCMC importance sampling to the advantage of the later. And discussing the choice of the tolerance sequence for ABC-MCMC. (Although I did not get from the thesis itself the target of the improvement discussed.)

non-reversible Langevin samplers

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 6, 2017 by xi'an

In the train to Oxford yesterday night, I read through the recently arXived Duncan et al.’s Nonreversible Langevin Samplers: Splitting Schemes, Analysis and Implementation. Standing up the whole trip in the great tradition of British trains.

The paper is fairly theoretical and full of Foster-Lyapunov assumptions but aims at defending an approach based on a non-reversible diffusion. One idea is that the diffusion based on the drift {∇ log π(x) + γ(x)} is associated with the target π provided

∇ . {π(x)γ(x)} = 0

which holds for the Langevin diffusion when γ(x)=0, but produces a non-reversible process in the alternative. The Langevin choice γ(x)=0 happens to be the worst possible when considering the asymptotic variance. In practice however the diffusion need be discretised, which induces an approximation that may be catastrophic for convergence if not corrected, and a relapse into reversibility if corrected by Metropolis. The proposal in the paper is to use a Lie-Trotter splitting I had never heard of before to split between reversible [∇ log π(x)] and non-reversible [γ(x)] parts of the process. The deterministic part is chosen as γ(x)=∇ log π(x) [but then what is the point since this is Langevin?] or as the gradient of a power of π(x). Although I was mostly lost by that stage, the paper then considers the error induced by a numerical integrator related with this deterministic part, towards deriving asymptotic mean and variance for the splitting scheme. On the unit hypercube. Although the paper includes a numerical example for the warped normal target, I find it hard to visualise the implementation of this scheme. Having obviously not heeded Nicolas’ and James’ advice, the authors also analyse the Pima Indian dataset by a logistic regression!)

non-reversible MCMC [comments]

Posted in Books, Mountains, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on May 26, 2015 by xi'an

[Here are comments made by Matt Graham that I thought would be more readable in a post format. The beautiful picture of the Alps above is his as well. I do not truly understand what Matt’s point is, as I did not cover continuous time processes in my discussion…]

In terms of interpretation of the diffusion with non-reversible drift component, I think this can be generalised from the Gaussian invariant density case by

dx = [ – (∂E/∂x) dt + √2 dw ] + S’ (∂E/∂x) dt

where ∂E/∂x is the usual gradient of the negative log (unnormalised) density / energy and S=-S’ is a skew symmetric matrix. In this form it seems the dynamic can be interpreted as the composition of an energy and volume conserving (non-canonical) Hamiltonian dynamic

dx/dt = S’ ∂E/∂x

and a (non-preconditioned) Langevin diffusion

dx = – (∂E/∂x) dt + √2 dw

As an alternative to discretising the combined dynamic, it might be interesting to compare to sequential alternation between ‘Hamiltonian’ steps either using a simple Euler discretisation

x’ = x + h S’ ∂E/∂x

or a symplectic method like implicit midpoint to maintain reversibility / volume preservation and then a standard MALA step

x’ = x – h (∂E/∂x) + √2 h w, w ~ N(0, I)

plus MH accept. If only one final MH accept step is done this overall dynamic will be reversible, however if a an intermediary MH accept was done after each Hamiltonian step (flipping the sign / transposing S on a rejection to maintain reversibility), the composed dynamic would in general be non-longer reversible and it would be interesting to compare performance in this case to that using a non-reversible MH acceptance on the combined dynamic (this alternative sidestepping the issues with finding an appropriate scale ε to maintain the non-negativity condition on the sum of the vorticity density and joint density on a proposed and current state).

With regards to your point on the positivity of g(x,y)+π(y)q(y,x), I’m not sure if I have fully understood your notation correctly or not, but I think you may have misread the definition of g(x,y) for the discretised Ornstein-Uhlenbeck case (apologies if instead the misinterpretation is mine!). The vorticity density is defined as the skew symmetric component of the density f of F(dx, dy) = µ(dx) Q(x, dy) with respect to the Lebesgue measure, where µ(dx) is the true invariant distribution of the Euler-Maruyama discretised diffusion based proposal density Q(x, dy) rather than g(x, y) being defined in terms of the skew-symmetric component of π(dx) Q(x, dy) which in general would lead to a vorticity density which does not meet the zero integral requirement as the target density π is not invariant in general with respect to Q.