Archive for Riemann sums

more air [&q’s] for MCMC [comments]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 11, 2021 by xi'an

[A rich set of comments by Tom Loredo about convergence assessments for MCMC that I feel needs reposting:]

Two quick points:

  • By coincidence (and for a different problem), I’ve just been looking at the work of Gorham & Mackey that I believe Pierre is referring to. This is probably the relevant paper: “Measuring Sample Quality with Kernels“.
  • Besides their new rank-based R-hat, bloggers on Gelman’s blog have also pointed to another R-hat replacement, R, developed by some Stan team members; it is “based on how well a machine learning classifier model can successfully discriminate the individual chains.” See: “R: A robust MCMC convergence diagnostic with uncertainty using decision tree classifiers”.

In addition, here’s an anecdote regarding your comment, “I remain perplexed and frustrated by the fact that, 30 years later, the computed values of the visited likelihoods are not better exploited.”

That has long bothered me, too. During a SAMSI program around 2006, I spent time working on one approach that tried to use the prior*likelihood (I call it q(θ), for “quasiposterior” and because it’s next to “p”!) to compute the marginal likelihood. It would take posterior samples (from MCMC or another approach) and find their Delaunay triangulation. Then, using q(θ) on the nodes of the simplices comprising the triangulation, it used a simplicial cubature rule to approximate the integral of q(theta) over the volume spanned by the samples.

As I recall, I only explored it with multivariate normal and Student-t targets. It failed, but in an interesting way. It worked well in low dimensions, but gave increasingly poor estimates as dimension grew. The problem appeared related to concentration of measure (or the location of the typical set), with the points not sufficiently covering the center or the large volume in the tails (or both; I can’t remember what diagnostics said exactly).

Another problem is that Delaunay triangulation gets expensive quickly with growing dimension. This method doesn’t need an optimal triangulation, so I wondered if there was a faster sub-optimal triangulation algorithm, but I couldn’t find one.

An interesting aspect of this approach is that the fact that the points are drawn from the prior doesn’t matter. Any set of points is a valid set of points for approximating the integral (in the spanned volume). I just used posterior samples because I presumed those would be available from MCMC. I briefly did some experiments taking the samples, and reweighting them to draw a subset for the cubature that was either over- or under-dispersed vs. the target. And one could improve things this way (I can’t remember what choice was better). This suggests that points drawn from q(theta) aren’t optimal for such cubature, but I never tried looking formally for the optimal choice.

I called the approach “adaptive simplicial cubature,” adaptive in the sense that the points are chosen in a way that depends on the integrand.

The only related work I could find at the time was work by you and Anne Philippe on Riemanns sums with MCMC (https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1008926514119). I later stumbled upon a paper on “random Riemann sum estimators” as an alternative to Monte Carlo that seems related but that I didn’t explore further (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.csda.2006.09.041).

I still find it hard to believe that the q values aren’t useful. Admittedly, in an n-dimensional distribution, it’s just 1 more quantity available beyond the n that comprise the sample location. But it’s a qualitatively different type of information from the sample location, and I can’t help but think there’s some clever way to use it (besides emulating the response surface).

control functionals for Monte Carlo integration

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 28, 2016 by xi'an

img_2451A paper on control variates by Chris Oates, Mark Girolami (Warwick) and Nicolas Chopin (CREST) appeared in a recent issue of Series B. I had read and discussed the paper with them previously and the following is a set of comments I wrote at some stage, to be taken with enough gains of salt since Chris, Mark and Nicolas answered them either orally or in the paper. Note also that I already discussed an earlier version, with comments that are not necessarily coherent with the following ones! [Thanks to the busy softshop this week, I resorted to publish some older drafts, so mileage can vary in the coming days.]

First, it took me quite a while to get over the paper, mostly because I have never worked with reproducible kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS) before. I looked at some proofs in the appendix and at the whole paper but could not spot anything amiss. It is obviously a major step to uncover a manageable method with a rate that is lower than √n. When I set my PhD student Anne Philippe on the approach via Riemann sums, we were quickly hindered by the dimension issue and could not find a way out. In the first versions of the nested sampling approach, John Skilling had also thought he could get higher convergence rates before realising the Monte Carlo error had not disappeared and hence was keeping the rate at the same √n speed.

The core proof in the paper leading to the 7/12 convergence rate relies on a mathematical result of Sun and Wu (2009) that a certain rate of regularisation of the function of interest leads to an average variance of order 1/6. I have no reason to mistrust the result (and anyway did not check the original paper), but I am still puzzled by the fact that it almost immediately leads to the control variate estimator having a smaller order variance (or at least variability). On average or in probability. (I am also uncertain on the possibility to interpret the boxplot figures as establishing super-√n speed.)

Another thing I cannot truly grasp is how the control functional estimator of (7) can be both a mere linear recombination of individual unbiased estimators of the target expectation and an improvement in the variance rate. I acknowledge that the coefficients of the matrices are functions of the sample simulated from the target density but still…

Another source of inner puzzlement is the choice of the kernel in the paper, which seems too simple to be able to cover all problems despite being used in every illustration there. I see the kernel as centred at zero, which means a central location must be know, decreasing to zero away from this centre, so possibly missing aspects of the integrand that are too far away, and isotonic in the reference norm, which also seems to preclude some settings where the integrand is not that compatible with the geometry.

I am equally nonplussed by the existence of a deterministic bound on the error, although it is not completely deterministic, depending on the values of the reproducible kernel at the points of the sample. Does it imply anything restrictive on the function to be integrated?

A side remark about the use of intractable in the paper is that, given the development of a whole new branch of computational statistics handling likelihoods that cannot be computed at all, intractable should possibly be reserved for such higher complexity models.