Archive for Sandro Botticelli

a journal of the plague year³ [lazy we]

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 12, 2022 by xi'an

Had the opportunity [Xmas gift!] to visit the Botticelli exhibit at the Musée Jacquemart-André in Paris. Besides the sheer beauty of the paintings, while is timeless, I was also impressed by the activity of Botticelli as an entrepreneur and designer, declining his signature on different media and delegating part of the realisation to employees. Read the beginning of the third volume of Raven’s mark, Crowfall, but could not complete the book as the story was terrible and the main character mostly disintegrated (both literally and scenario-wise). Too bad that an initially great if grim universe construction could not keep up till the end. (Involving deities is always risky in this branch of the literature!) Also read another BD taking place near Cayenne and other places we visited, if in the 18th Century.

Watched over a lazy weekend two several admittedly terrible movies whose only appeal was watching in the vernarcular, Major Grom: Plague Doctor, and Minnal Murali. Also was rather disappointed by Don’t look up, because I found the satire too heavy-handed. And hence failing to engage readers about the sloth pace of governments and influencers to face the climate crisis, favouring futile or immediate concerns (as shown by French gilets jaunes putting la fin du mois above la fin du monde, or UK media cycling on BoJo’s partygate when Russia is about to invade Ukraine!). I also presumably missed most of the US-centric undercurrents.

inf R ! [book review]

Posted in Books, R, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2021 by xi'an

Thanks to my answering a (basic) question on X validated involving an R code, R mistakes and some misunderstanding about Bayesian hierarchical modelling, I got pointed out to Patrick Burns’ The R inferno. This is not a recent book as the second edition is of 2012, with a 2011 version still available on-line. Which is the version I read. As hinted by the cover, the book plays on Dante’s Inferno and each chapter is associated with a circle of Hell… Including drawings by Botticelli. The style is thus most enjoyable and sometimes hilarious. Like hell!

The first circle (reserved for virtuous pagans) is about treating integral reals as if they were integers, the second circle (attributed to gluttons, although Dante’s is for the lustful) is about allocating more space along the way, as in the question I answered and in most of my students’ codes! The third circle (allocated here to blasphemous sinners, destined for Dante’s seven circle, when Dante’s third circle is to the gluttons) points out the consequences of not vectorising, with for instance the impressive capacities of the ifelse() function [exploited to the max in R codecolfing!].  And the fourth circle (made for the lustfuls rather than Dante’s avaricious and prodigals) is a short warning about the opposite over-vectorising. Circle five (destined for the treasoners, and not Dante’s wrathfuls) pushes for and advises about writing R functions. Circle six recovers Dante’s classification, welcoming (!) heretics, and prohibiting global assignments, in another short chapter. Circle seven (alloted to the simoniacs—who should be sharing the eight circle with many other sinners—rather than the violents as in Dante’s seventh) discusses object attributes, with the distinction between S3 and S4 methods somewhat lost on me. Circle eight (targeting the fraudulents, as in Dante’s original) is massive as it covers “a large number of ghosts, chimeras and devils”, a collection of difficulties and dangers and freak occurences, with the initial warning that “It is a sin to assume that code does what is intended”. A lot of these came as surprises to me and I was rarely able to spot the difficulty without the guidance of the book. Plenty to learn from these examples and counter-examples. Reaching Circle nine (where live (!) the thieves, rather than Dante’s traitors). A “special place for those who feel compelled to drag the rest of us into hell.” Discussing the proper ways to get help on fori. Like Stack Exchange. Concluding with the tongue-in-cheek comment that “there seems to be positive correlation between a person’s level of annoyance at [being asked several times the same question] and ability to answer questions.” This being a hidden test, right?!, as the correlation should be negative.

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