Archive for Scandinavia

Takaisin helsinkiin

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 23, 2017 by xi'an

I am off tomorrow morning to Helsinki for the European Meeting of Statisticians (EMS 2017). Where I will talk on how to handle multiple estimators in Monte Carlo settings (although I have not made enough progress in this direction to include anything truly novel in the talk!) Here are the slides:

I look forward this meeting, as I remember quite fondly the previous one I attended in Budapest. Which was of the highest quality in terms of talks and interactions. (I also remember working hard with Randal Douc on a yet-unfinished project!)

ABC postdoc in Olso

Posted in Kids, Mountains, pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on April 26, 2017 by xi'an

Jukka Corander sent me the announcement that he is opening a 3 year postdoctoral position at the University of Oslo, to work with him and his team on ABC projects. This sounds quite an exciting offer, plus gives the nominee the opportunity to live in the most enjoyable city of Oslo for several years in fairly comfy conditions! The deadline is May 31. (If I was at a stage of my career where applying made sense, I would definitely candidate. Not even waiting for the outcome of the French elections on May 7!)

the girl who saved the king of Sweden [book review]

Posted in Books, Kids, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 27, 2015 by xi'an

When visiting a bookstore in Florence last month, during our short trip to Tuscany, I came upon this book with enough of a funny cover and enough of a funny title (possibly capitalising on the similarity with “the girl who played with fire”] to make me buy it. I am glad I gave in to this impulse as the book is simply hilarious! The style and narrative relate rather strongly to the series of similarly [mostly] hilarious picaresque tales written by Paasilina and not only because both authors are from Scandinavia. There is the same absurd feeling that the book characters should not have this sort of things happening to them and still the morbid fascination to watch catastrophe after catastrophe being piled upon them. While the story is deeply embedded within the recent history of South Africa and [not so much] of Sweden for the past 30 years, including major political figures, there is no true attempt at making the story in the least realistic, which is another characteristic of the best stories of Paasilina. Here, a young girl escapes the poverty of the slums of Soweto, to eventually make her way to Sweden along with a spare nuclear bomb and a fistful of diamonds. Which alas are not eternal… Her intelligence helps her to overcome most difficulties, but even her needs from time to time to face absurd situations as another victim. All is well that ends well for most characters in the story, some of whom one would prefer to vanish in a gruesome accident. Which seemed to happen until another thread in the story saved the idiot. The satire of South Africa and of Sweden is most enjoyable if somewhat easy! Now I have to read the previous volume in the series, The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared!

Italian shoes

Posted in Books with tags , , , , , on February 11, 2012 by xi'an

This week I read a second Henning Mankell novel (lent to me by my daughter), Italian shoes. It is more a tale than a novel, in that characters act and talk as in parables (in the same sense MacCarthy’s The Crossing is a parable). So it is mostly unrealistic. Nonetheless, I enjoyed Italian shoes very much, primarily because of the unappealing central character, a retired surgeon living as a recluse on an island, who is forced to reassess all his previous choices when faced with one, then two, then three strong women. (A very vague connection with Tea Bag at one point, not really of importance.) At some point the story drifts towards some survival communities that reminded me very much of Paasalina, with this weird fascination for closeted communities living in the middle of the forest. This is certainly not the strongest part of the book, but it brings a new major character and a transition to the third part, with yet a new major character and the return to the island which is more like a new beginning…