Archive for sleeping beauty paradox

Dutch book for sleeping beauty

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on May 15, 2017 by xi'an

After my short foray in Dutch book arguments two weeks ago in Harvard, I spotted a recent arXival by Vincent Conitzer analysing the sleeping beauty paradox from a Dutch book perspective. (The paper “A Dutch book against sleeping beauties who are evidential decision theorists” actually appeared in Synthese two years ago, which makes me wonder why it comes out only now on arXiv. And yes I am aware the above picture is about Bansky’s Cindirella and not sleeping beauty!)

“if Beauty is an evidential decision theorist, then in variants where she does not always have the same information available to her upon waking, she is vulnerable to Dutch books, regardless of whether she is a halfer or a thirder.”

As recalled in the introduction of the paper, there exist ways to construct Dutch book arguments against thirders and halfers alike. Conitzer constructs a variant that also distinguishes between a causal and an evidential decision theorist (sleeping beauty), the later being susceptible to another Dutch book. Which is where I get lost as I have no idea of a distinction between those two types of decision theory. Quickly checking on Wikipedia returned the notion that the latter decision theory maximises the expected utility conditional on the decision, but this does not clarify the issue in that it seems to imply the decision impacts the probability of the event… Hence keeping me unable to judge of the relevance of the arguments therein (which is no surprise since only based on a cursory read).

sleeping beauty

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on December 24, 2016 by xi'an

Through X validated, W. Huber made me aware of this probability paradox [or para-paradox] of which I had never heard before. One of many guises of this paradox goes as follows:

Shahrazad is put to sleep on Sunday night. Depending on the hidden toss of a fair coin, she is awaken either once (Heads) or twice (Tails). After each awakening, she gets back to sleep and forget that awakening. When awakened, what should her probability of Heads be?

My first reaction is to argue that Shahrazad does not gain information between the time she goes to sleep when the coin is fair and the time(s) she is awaken, apart from being awaken, since she does not know how many times she has been awaken, so the probability of Heads remains ½. However, when thinking more about it on my bike ride to work, I thought of the problem as a decision theory or betting problem, which makes ⅓ the optimal answer.

I then read [if not the huge literature] a rather extensive analysis of the paradox by Ciweski, Kadane, Schervish, Seidenfeld, and Stern (CKS³), which concludes at roughly the same thing, namely that, when Monday is completely exchangeable with Tuesday, meaning that no event can bring any indication to Shahrazad of which day it is, the posterior probability of Heads does not change (Corollary 1) but that a fair betting strategy is p=1/3, with the somewhat confusing remark by CKS³ that this may differ from her credence. But then what is the point of the experiment? Or what is the meaning of credence? If Shahrazad is asked for an answer, there must be a utility or a penalty involved otherwise she could as well reply with a probability of p=-3.14 or p=10.56… This makes for another ill-defined aspect of the “paradox”.

Another remark about this ill-posed nature of the experiment is that, when imagining running an ABC experiment, I could only come with one where the fair coin is thrown (Heads or Tails) and a day (Monday or Tuesday) is chosen at random. Then every proposal (Heads or Tails) is accepted as an awakening, hence the posterior on Heads is the uniform prior. The same would not occurs if we consider the pair of awakenings under Tails as two occurrences of (p,E), but this does not sound (as) correct since Shahrazad only knows of one E: to paraphrase Jeffreys, this is an unobservable result that may have not occurred. (Or in other words, Bayesian learning is not possible on Groundhog Day!)