Archive for Spanish history

Réquiem por un campesino español [book review]

Posted in Books, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , on December 17, 2017 by xi'an

Thanks To Victor Elvira, I read this fantastic novel by Ramón Sender, a requiem for a Spanish peasant, Pablo, which tells the story of a bright and progressive Spanish peasant from Aragon, who got shot by the fascists during the Spanish Civil War. The story is short and brilliant, told from the eyes of the parish priest who denounced Pablo to the Franco falanges who eventually executed it. The style is brilliant as well, since the priest keeps returning to his long-term connection with Pablo, from his years as an altar boy, discovering poverty and injustice when visiting dying parishioners with the priest, to launching rural reform actions against the local landowners. And uselessly if understandably trying to justify his responsibility in the death of the young man, celebrating a mass in his memory where no one from the village attends, except for the landowners themselves. A truly moving celebration of the Spanish Civil War and of the massive support of the catholic church for Franco.

Dos de Mayo [book review]

Posted in Books with tags , , , , , , , , on August 23, 2016 by xi'an

Following a discusion I had with Victor Elvirà about Spanish books, I ordered a book by Arturo Pérez-Reverte called a Day of Wrath (un día de cólera), but apparently not translated into English. The day of wrath is the second of May, 1808, when the city of Madrid went to arms against the French occupation by Napoléon’s troops. An uprising that got crushed by Murat’s repression the very same day, but which led to the entire Spain taking arms against the occupation. The book is written out of historical accounts of the many participants to the uprising, from both Madrilene and French sides. Because of so many viewpoints being reported, some for a single paragraph before the victims die, the literary style is not particularly pleasant, but this is nonetheless a gripping book that I read within a single day while going (or trying to get) to San Francisco. And it is historically revealing of how unprepared the French troops were about an uprising by people mostly armed with navajas and a few hunting rifles. Who still managed to hold parts of the town for most of a day, with the help of a single artillery battalion while the rest of the troops stayed in their barracks. The author actually insists very much on that aspect, that the rebellion was mostly due to the action of the people, while leading classes, the Army, and the clergy almost uniformly condemned it. Upped estimations on the number of deaths on that day (and the following days) range around 500 for Madrilenes and 150 for French tropps, but the many stories running in the book give the impression of many more casualties.