Archive for St. Andrew

Fate & Fortune [book review]

Posted in Books, Travel with tags , , , , , , , on February 10, 2019 by xi'an

After enjoying very much the first book, Hue & Cry, in the Hew Cullan series by Shirley McKay, I bought the following ones and read Fate & Fortune over the vacation break. If anything, I enjoyed this one even more, as it disclosed other aspects of 16th Century Scotland, still with the oppressive domination of the Kirk, the highly puritan Church of Scotland, over all aspects of everyday life, but also a more rational form of Law, plus the first instances of caitch, imported from France jeu de paume. And the medical approach of the time against an epidemics of syphilis. And the dangerous life of printers at the time, always in danger of arrest and worse. As usual with historical whodunits, it is hard to guess what is genuinely from 1580’s and what has been imported from the present era, but this is a most pleasant (light and short) book to read!

hue & cry [book review]

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , on December 8, 2018 by xi'an

While visiting the Blackwell’s bookstore by the University of Edinburgh last June, I spotted this historical whodunit in the local interest section. Hue & Cry by Shirley McKay. It stayed on a to-read pile by my bed until a few weeks ago when I started reading it and got more and more engrossed in the story. While the style is not always at its best and the crime aspects are somewhat thin, I find the description of the Scottish society of the time (1570’s) fascinating (and hopefully accurate), especially the absolute dominion of the local Church (Kirk) on every aspect of life and the helplessness of women always under the threat of witchcraft accusations. Which could end up with the death penalty, as in thousands of cases. The book reminds me to some extent of the early Susanna Gregory’s books in that it also involves scholars, teaching well-off students with limited intellectual abilities, while bright but poorer students have to work for the college to make up for their lack of funds. As indicated above, the criminal part is less interesting as the main investigator unfolds the complicated plot without much of a hint. And convinces the juries rather too easily in my opinion. An overall fine novel, nonetheless!