Archive for Stack Exchange

another attempt at code golf

Posted in Books, Kids, R with tags , , , on June 12, 2019 by xi'an

I had another lazy weekend go at code golf, trying to code in the most condensed way the following task. Provided with a square matrix A of positive integers, keep iterating the steps

  • take the highest square 𝑥² in A.
  • find the smallest adjacent neighbour 𝑛
  • replace with x and n with nx

until no square is left (with neighbour defined as either horizontally or vertically and without wrapping around). While I managed a 217 bytes solution, compared with Robin’s 179b improvement, which remains surprising readable!, the puzzle offers two further questions:

  1. is there a non-iterative way to find the final matrix B?
  2. the puzzle assumes that A satisfies that at each step, the highest square and the smallest neighbour n will be unique, and that the sequence will not repeat forever. Is there a fool-proof way to check this is the case?

 

an attempt at code golf

Posted in Kids, R with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 15, 2019 by xi'an

Having discovered codegolf on Stack Exchange a few weeks ago, I spotted a few interesting puzzles since then but only got the opportunity at a try over a quiet and rainy weekend (and Robin being on vacation)! The challenge was to write an R code for deciding whether or not a given integer n is congruent or not, when congruent means that it is the surface of a rectangle triangle with all three sides rational. The question included a pointer to the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture as a mean to check congruence although the real solution was provided by Tunnell’s Theorem, which states that n is congruent if and only if the number of integer solutions to 2x²+y²+8z²=n is twice as much as the number of integer solutions to 2x²+y²+32z²=n if n is odd and  the number of integer solutions to 8x²+y²+16z²=n is twice as much as the number of integer solutions to 8x²+y²+64z²=n if n is even. Although this is only true for squared-free integers. (I actually spent more time on figuring out the exact wording of the theorem than on optimising the R code!)

My original solution

p=function(n){
 for (i in(n:2)^2)if(n%%i<1)n=n/i
 if(n%%2){d=8;f=2;g=16}else{d=2;f=1;g=8}
 A=0;b=(-n:n)^2
 for(x in d*b)for(y in x+f*b)for(z in g*b)
  A=A+(y+z==n)-2*(y+4*z==n)
 A==0}

was quite naïve, as shown by the subsequent improvements by senior players, like the final (?) version of Guiseppe:

function(n){b=(-n:n)^2
for(i in b[b>0])n=n/i^(!n%%i)
P=2^(n%%2)
o=outer
!sum(!o(y<-o(8/P*b,2*b,"+")/P-n,z<-16/P*b,"+"),-2*!o(y,4*z,"+"))}

exhibiting a load of code golf tricks, from using an anonymous function to renaming functions with a single letter, to switching from integers to booleans and back with the exclamation mark.

a glaring mistake

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , on November 28, 2018 by xi'an

Someone posted this question about Bayes factors in my book on Saturday morning and I could not believe the glaring typo pointed out there had gone through the centuries without anyone noticing! There should be no index 0 or 1 on the θ’s in either integral (or indices all over). I presume I made this typo when cutting & pasting from the previous formula (which addressed the case of two point null hypotheses), but I am quite chagrined that I sabotaged the definition of the Bayes factor for generations of readers of the Bayesian Choice. Apologies!!!

questioning the Bayesian choice

Posted in Books, Kids, Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on November 13, 2018 by xi'an

When I woke up (very early!) in Oaxaca, on Remembrance Day, I noticed a long question about The Bayesian Choice contents on X validated. The originator of the question (OQ) was puzzled about several statements in the book on maximum entropy  methods, from the nature of the moment constraints, outside standard moments, to the existence of a maximum entropy prior (as exemplified by quantiles), to the deeper issue of the ultimate arbitrariness of “the” maximum entropy prior since it is also determined by the choice of the dominating measure. (Never neglect the dominating measure!) A more challenging concept, hopefully making it home with the OQ.

Le Monde puzzle [#1045]

Posted in Books, Kids with tags , , , , , , on May 13, 2018 by xi'an

An minor arithmetic Le Monde mathematical puzzle:

Take a sequence of 16  integers with 4 digits each, separated by 2,  such that it contains a perfect square and its sum is a perfect cube. What are the possible squares and cubes?

The question is dead easy to code in R

for (x in as.integer(1e3:(1e4-16))){
  if (max(round(sqrt(x+2*(0:15)))^2==x+2*(0:15))==1) {
    b=sqrt((x+2*(0:15))[round(sqrt(x+2*(0:15)))^2==x+2*(0:15)])
  if ((round((2*x+30)^(1/3)))^3==(2*x+30)) 
   print(c(x,b,(16*(x+15))^(1/3)))}}

and return the following solutions:

[1] 1357   37   28
[1] 5309   73   44

Nothing that exciting…!