Archive for stochastic gradient

MCM17 snapshots

Posted in Kids, Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 5, 2017 by xi'an

At MCM2017 today, Radu Craiu presented a talk on adaptive Metropolis-within-Gibbs, using a family of proposals for each component of the target and weighting them by jumping distance. And managing the adaptation from the selection rate rather than from the acceptance rate as we did in population Monte Carlo. I find the approach quite interesting in that adaptation and calibration of Metropolis-within-Gibbs is quite challenging due to the conditioning, i.e., the optimality of one scale is dependent on the other components. Some of the graphs produced by Radu during the talk showed a form of local adaptivity that seemed promising. This raised a question I could not ask for lack of time, namely that with a large enough collection of proposals, it is unclear why this approach provides a gain compared with particle, sequential or population Monte Carlo algorithms. Indeed, when there are many parallel proposals, clouds of particles can be generated from all proposals in proportion to their appeal and merged together in an importance manner, leading to an easier adaptation. As it went, the notion of local scaling also reflected in Mylène Bédard’s talk on another Metropolis-within-Gibbs study of optimal rates. The other interesting sessions I attended were the ones on importance sampling with stochastic gradient optimisation, organised by Ingmar Schuster, and on sequential Monte Carlo, with a divide-and-conquer resolution through trees by Lindsten et al. I had missed.

the invasion of the stochastic gradients

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 10, 2017 by xi'an

Within the same day, I spotted three submissions to arXiv involving stochastic gradient descent, that I briefly browsed on my trip back from Wales:

  1. Stochastic Gradient Descent as Approximate Bayesian inference, by Mandt, Hoffman, and Blei, where this technique is used as a type of variational Bayes method, where the minimum Kullback-Leibler distance to the true posterior can be achieved. Rephrasing the [scalable] MCMC algorithm of Welling and Teh (2011) as such an approximation.
  2. Further and stronger analogy between sampling and optimization: Langevin Monte Carlo and gradient descent, by Arnak Dalalyan, which establishes a convergence of the uncorrected Langevin algorithm to the right target distribution in the sense of the Wasserstein distance. (Uncorrected in the sense that there is no Metropolis step, meaning this is a Euler approximation.) With an extension to the noisy version, when the gradient is approximated eg by subsampling. The connection with stochastic gradient descent is thus tenuous, but Arnak explains the somewhat disappointing rate of convergence as being in agreement with optimisation rates.
  3. Stein variational adaptive importance sampling, by Jun Han and Qiang Liu, which relates to our population Monte Carlo algorithm, but as a non-parametric version, using RKHS to represent the transforms of the particles at each iteration. The sampling method follows two threads of particles, one that is used to estimate the transform by a stochastic gradient update, and another one that is used for estimation purposes as in a regular population Monte Carlo approach. Deconstructing into those threads allows for conditional independence that makes convergence easier to establish. (A problem we also hit when working on the AMIS algorithm.)

MCM 2017

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 10, 2017 by xi'an

Je reviendrai à Montréal, as the song by Robert Charlebois goes, for the MCM 2017 meeting there, on July 3-7. I was invited to give a plenary talk by the organisers of the conference . Along with

Steffen Dereich, WWU Münster, Germany
Paul Dupuis, Brown University, Providence, USA
Mark Girolami, Imperial College London, UK
Emmanuel Gobet, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France
Aicke Hinrichs, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria
Alexander Keller, NVIDIA Research, Germany
Gunther Leobacher, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria
Art B. Owen, Stanford University, USA

Note that, while special sessions are already selected, including oneon Stochastic Gradient methods for Monte Carlo and Variational Inference, organised by Victor Elvira and Ingmar Schuster (my only contribution to this session being the suggestion they organise it!), proposals for contributed talks will be selected based on one-page abstracts, to be submitted by March 1.

Michael Jordan’s seminar in Paris next week

Posted in Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on June 3, 2016 by xi'an

Next week, on June 7, at 4pm, Michael will give a seminar at INRIA, rue du Charolais, Paris 12 (map). Here is the abstract:

A Variational Perspective on Accelerated Methods in Optimization

Accelerated gradient methods play a central role in optimization,achieving optimal rates in many settings. While many generalizations and extensions of Nesterov’s original acceleration method have been proposed,it is not yet clear what is the natural scope of the acceleration concept.In this paper, we study accelerated methods from a continuous-time perspective. We show that there is a Lagrangian functional that we call the Bregman Lagrangian which generates a large class of accelerated methods in continuous time, including (but not limited to) accelerated gradient descent, its non-Euclidean extension, and accelerated higher-order gradient methods. We show that the continuous-time limit of all of these methods correspond to travelling the same curve in space time at different speeds, and in this sense the continuous-time setting is the natural one for understanding acceleration.  Moreover, from this perspective, Nesterov’s technique and many of its generalizations can be viewed as a systematic way to go from the continuous-time curves generated by the Bregman Lagrangian to a family of discrete-time accelerated algorithms. [Joint work with Andre Wibisono and Ashia Wilson.]

(Interested readers need to register to attend the lecture.)

Approximate Maximum Likelihood Estimation

Posted in Books, Mountains, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 21, 2015 by xi'an

linz3Bertl et al. arXived last July a paper on a maximum likelihood estimator based on an alternative to ABC techniques. And to indirect inference. (One of the authors in et al. is Andreas Futschik whom I visited last year in Linz.) Paper that I only spotted when gathering references for a reading list on ABC… The method is related to the “original ABC paper” of Diggle and Gratton (1984) which, parallel to Rubin (1984), contains in retrospect the idea of ABC methods. The starting point is stochastic approximation, namely the optimisation of a function of a parameter θ when written as an expectation of a random variable Y, E[Y|θ], as in the Kiefer-Wolfowitz algorithm. However, in the case of the likelihood function, there is rarely an unbiased estimator and the authors propose instead to use a kernel density estimator of the density of the summary statistic. This means that, at each iteration of the Kiefer-Wolfowitz algorithm, two sets of observations and hence of summary statistics are simulated and two kernel density estimates derived, both to be applied to the observed summary. The sequences underlying the Kiefer-Wolfowitz algorithm are taken from (the excellent optimisation book of) Spall (2003). Along with on-the-go adaptation and convergence test.

The theoretical difficulty in this extension is however that the kernel density estimator is not unbiased and thus that, rigorously speaking, the validation of the Kiefer-Wolfowitz algorithm does not apply here. On the practical side, the need for multiple starting points and multiple simulations of pseudo-samples may induce considerable time overload. Especially if  bootstrap is used to evaluate the precision of the MLE approximation. Besides normal and M/G/1 queue examples, the authors illustrate the approach on a population genetic dataset of Borneo and Sumatra orang-utans. With 5 parameters and 28 summary statistics. Which thus means using a kernel density estimator in dimension 28, a rather perilous adventure..!

Bangalore workshop [ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು ಕಾರ್ಯಾಗಾರ]

Posted in pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , on July 30, 2014 by xi'an

iiscFirst day at the Indo-French Centre for Applied Mathematics and the get-together (or speed-dating!) workshop. The campus of the Indian Institute of Science of Bangalore where we all stay is very pleasant with plenty of greenery in the middle of a very busy city. Plus, being at about 1000m means the temperature remains tolerable for me, to the point of letting me run in the morning.Plus, staying in a guest house in the campus also means genuine and enjoyable south Indian food.

The workshop is a mix of statisticians and of mathematicians of neurosciences, from both India and France, and we are few enough to have a lot of opportunities for discussion and potential joint projects. I gave the first talk this morning (hence a fairly short run!) on ABC model choice with random forests and, given the mixed audience, may have launched too quickly into the technicalities of the forests. Even though I think I kept the statisticians on-board for most of the talk. While the mathematical biology talks mostly went over my head (esp. when I could not resist dozing!), I enjoyed the presentation of Francis Bach of a fast stochastic gradient algorithm, where the stochastic average is only updated one term at a time, for apparently much faster convergence results. This is related with a joint work with Éric Moulines that both Éric and Francis presented in the past month. And makes me wonder at the intuition behind the major speed-up. Shrinkage to the mean maybe?