Archive for summary statistics

automated ABC summary combination

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on March 16, 2017 by xi'an

Jonathan Harrison and Ruth Baker (Oxford University) arXived this morning a paper on the optimal combination of summaries for ABC in the sense of deriving the proper weights in an Euclidean distance involving all the available summaries. The idea is to find the weights that lead to the maximal distance between prior and posterior, in a way reminiscent of Bernardo’s (1979) maximal information principle. Plus a sparsity penalty à la Lasso. The associated algorithm is sequential in that the weights are updated at each iteration. The paper does not get into theoretical justifications but considers instead several examples with limited numbers of both parameters and summary statistics. Which may highlight the limitations of the approach in that handling (and eliminating) a large number of parameters may prove impossible this way, when compared with optimisation methods like random forests. Or summary-free distances between empirical distributions like the Wasserstein distance.

ABC with kernelised regression

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 22, 2017 by xi'an

sunset from the Banff Centre, Banff, Canada, March 21, 2012The exact title of the paper by Jovana Metrovic, Dino Sejdinovic, and Yee Whye Teh is DR-ABC: Approximate Bayesian Computation with Kernel-Based Distribution Regression. It appeared last year in the proceedings of ICML.  The idea is to build ABC summaries by way of reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS). Regressing such embeddings to the “optimal” choice of summary statistics by kernel ridge regression. With a possibility to derive summary statistics for quantities of interest rather than for the entire parameter vector. The use of RKHS reminds me of Arthur Gretton’s approach to ABC, although I see no mention made of that work in the current paper.

In the RKHS pseudo-linear formulation, the prediction of a parameter value given a sample attached to this value looks like a ridge estimator in classical linear estimation. (I thus wonder at why one would stop at the ridge stage instead of getting the full Bayes treatment!) Things get a bit more involved in the case of parameters (and observations) of interest, as the modelling requires two RKHS, because of the conditioning on the nuisance observations. Or rather three RHKS. Since those involve a maximum mean discrepancy between probability distributions, which define in turn a sort of intrinsic norm, I also wonder at a Wasserstein version of this approach.

What I find hard to understand in the paper is how a large-dimension large-size sample can be managed by such methods with no visible loss of information and no explosion of the computing budget. The authors mention Fourier features, which never rings a bell for me, but I wonder how this operates in a general setting, i.e., outside the iid case. The examples do not seem to go into enough details for me to understand how this massive dimension reduction operates (and they remain at a moderate level in terms of numbers of parameters). I was hoping Jovana Mitrovic could present her work here at the 17w5025 workshop but she sadly could not make it to Banff for lack of funding!

a well-hidden E step

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, R, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 3, 2017 by xi'an

Grand Palais from Esplanade des Invalides, Paris, Dec. 07, 2012A recent question on X validated ended up being quite interesting! The model under consideration is made of parallel Markov chains on a finite state space, all with the same Markov transition matrix, M, which turns into a hidden Markov model when the only summary available is the number of chains in a given state at a given time. When writing down the EM algorithm, the E step involves the expected number of moves from a given state to a given state at a given time. The conditional distribution of those numbers of chains is a product of multinomials across times and starting states, with no Markov structure since the number of chains starting from a given state is known at each instant. Except that those multinomials are constrained by the number of “arrivals” in each state at the next instant and that this makes the computation of the expectation intractable, as far as I can see.

A solution by Monte Carlo EM means running the moves for each instant under the above constraints, which is thus a sort of multinomial distribution with fixed margins, enjoying a closed-form expression but for the normalising constant. The direct simulation soon gets too costly as the number of states increases and I thus considered a basic Metropolis move, using one margin (row or column) or the other as proposal, with the correction taken on another margin. This is very basic but apparently enough for the purpose of the exercise. If I find time in the coming days, I will try to look at the ABC resolution of this problem, a logical move when starting from non-sufficient statistics!

local kernel reduction for ABC

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on September 14, 2016 by xi'an

“…construction of low dimensional summary statistics can be performed as in a black box…”

Today Zhou and Fukuzumi just arXived a paper that proposes a gradient-based dimension reduction for ABC summary statistics, in the spirit of RKHS kernels as advocated, e.g., by Arthur Gretton. Here the projection is a mere linear projection Bs of the vector of summary statistics, s, where B is an estimated Hessian matrix associated with the posterior expectation E[θ|s]. (There is some connection with the latest version of Li’s and Fearnhead’s paper on ABC convergence as they also define a linear projection of the summary statistics, based on asymptotic arguments, although their matrix does depend on the true value of the parameter.) The linearity sounds like a strong restriction [to me] especially when the summary statistics have no reason to belong to a vectorial space and thus be open to changes of bases and linear projections. For instance, a specific value taken by a summary statistic, like 0 say, may be more relevant than the range of their values. On a larger scale, I am doubtful about always projecting a vector of summary statistics on a subspace with the smallest possible dimension, ie the dimension of θ. In practical settings, it seems impossible to derive the optimal projection and a subvector is almost certain to loose information against a larger vector.

“Another proposal is to use different summary statistics for different parameters.”

Which is exactly what we did in our random forest estimation paper. Using a different forest for each parameter of interest (but no real tree was damaged in the experiment!).

Approximate Bayesian computation via sufficient dimension reduction

Posted in Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on August 26, 2016 by xi'an

“One of our contribution comes from the mathematical analysis of the consequence of conditioning the parameters of interest on consistent statistics and intrinsically inconsistent statistics”

Xiaolong Zhong and Malay Ghosh have just arXived an ABC paper focussing on the convergence of the method. And on the use of sufficient dimension reduction techniques for the construction of summary statistics. I had not heard of this approach before so read the paper with interest. I however regret that the paper does not link with the recent consistency results of Liu and Fearnhead and of Daniel Frazier, Gael Martin, Judith Rousseau and myself. When conditioning upon the MLE [or the posterior mean] as the summary statistic, Theorem 1 states that the Bernstein-von Mises theorem holds, missing a limit in the tolerance ε. And apparently missing conditions on the speed of convergence of this tolerance to zero although the conditioning event involves the true value of the parameter. This makes me wonder at the relevance of the result. The part about partial posteriors and the characterisation of limiting posterior distributions stats with the natural remark that the mean of the summary statistic must identify the whole parameter θ to achieve consistency, a point central to our 2014 JRSS B paper. The authors suggest using a support vector machine to derive the summary statistics, an idea already exploited by Heiko Strathmann et al.. There is no consistency result of relevance for ABC in that second and final part, which ends up rather abruptly. Overall, while the paper contributes to the current reflection on the convergence properties of ABC, the lack of scaling of the tolerance ε calls for further investigations.

MCqMC 2016 [#2]

Posted in pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 17, 2016 by xi'an

In her plenary talk this morning, Christine Lemieux discussed connections between quasi-Monte Carlo and copulas, covering a question I have been considering for a while. Namely, when provided with a (multivariate) joint cdf F, is there a generic way to invert a vector of uniforms [or quasi-uniforms] into a simulation from F? For Archimedian copulas (as we always can get back to copulas), there is a resolution by the Marshall-Olkin representation,  but this puts a restriction on the distributions F that can be considered. The session on synthetic likelihoods [as introduced by Simon Wood in 2010] put together by Scott Sisson was completely focussed on using normal approximations for the distribution of the vector of summary statistics, rather than the standard ABC non-parametric approximation. While there is a clear (?) advantage in using a normal pseudo-likelihood, since it stabilises with much less simulations than a non-parametric version, I find it difficult to compare both approaches, as they lead to different posterior distributions. In particular, I wonder at the impact of the dimension of the summary statistics on the approximation, in the sense that it is less and less likely that the joint is normal as this dimension increases. Whether this is damaging for the resulting inference is another issue, possibly handled by a supplementary ABC step that would take the first-step estimate as summary statistic. (As a side remark, I am intrigued at everyone being so concerned with unbiasedness of methods that are approximations with no assessment of the amount of approximation!) The last session of the day was about multimodality and MCMC solutions, with talks by Hyungsuk Tak, Pierre Jacob and Babak Shababa, plus mine. Hunsuk presented the RAM algorithm I discussed earlier under the title of “love-hate” algorithm, which was a kind reference to my post! (I remain puzzled by the ability of the algorithm to jump to another mode, given that the intermediary step aims at a low or even zero probability region with an infinite mass target.) And Pierre talked about using SMC for Wang-Landau algorithms, with a twist to the classical stochastic optimisation schedule that preserves convergence. And a terrific illustration on a distribution inspired from the Golden Gate Bridge that reminded me of my recent crossing! The discussion around my folded Markov chain talk focussed on the extension of the partition to more than two sets, the difficulty being in generating automated projections, with comments about connections with computer graphic tools. (Too bad that the parallel session saw talks by Mark Huber and Rémi Bardenet that I missed! Enjoying a terrific Burmese dinner with Rémi, Pierre and other friends also meant I could not post this entry on time for the customary 00:16. Not that it matters in the least…)

asymptotic properties of Approximate Bayesian Computation

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 26, 2016 by xi'an

Street light near the St Kilda Road bridge, Melbourne, July 21, 2012With David Frazier and Gael Martin from Monash University, and with Judith Rousseau (Paris-Dauphine), we have now completed and arXived a paper entitled Asymptotic Properties of Approximate Bayesian Computation. This paper undertakes a fairly complete study of the large sample properties of ABC under weak regularity conditions. We produce therein sufficient conditions for posterior concentration, asymptotic normality of the ABC posterior estimate, and asymptotic normality of the ABC posterior mean. Moreover, those (theoretical) results are of significant import for practitioners of ABC as they pertain to the choice of tolerance ε used within ABC for selecting parameter draws. In particular, they [the results] contradict the conventional ABC wisdom that this tolerance should always be taken as small as the computing budget allows.

Now, this paper bears some similarities with our earlier paper on the consistency of ABC, written with David and Gael. As it happens, the paper was rejected after submission and I then discussed it in an internal seminar in Paris-Dauphine, with Judith taking part in the discussion and quickly suggesting some alternative approach that is now central to the current paper. The previous version analysed Bayesian consistency of ABC under specific uniformity conditions on the summary statistics used within ABC. But conditions for consistency are now much weaker conditions than earlier, thanks to Judith’s input!

There are also similarities with Li and Fearnhead (2015). Previously discussed here. However, while similar in spirit, the results contained in the two papers strongly differ on several fronts:

  1. Li and Fearnhead (2015) considers an ABC algorithm based on kernel smoothing, whereas our interest is the original ABC accept-reject and its many derivatives
  2. our theoretical approach permits a complete study of the asymptotic properties of ABC, posterior concentration, asymptotic normality of ABC posteriors, and asymptotic normality of the ABC posterior mean, whereas Li and Fearnhead (2015) is only concerned with asymptotic normality of the ABC posterior mean estimator (and various related point estimators);
  3. the results of Li and Fearnhead (2015) are derived under very strict uniformity and continuity/differentiability conditions, which bear a strong resemblance to those conditions in Yuan and Clark (2004) and Creel et al. (2015), while the result herein do not rely on such conditions and only assume very weak regularity conditions on the summaries statistics themselves; this difference allows us to characterise the behaviour of ABC in situations not covered by the approach taken in Li and Fearnhead (2015);