Archive for survey

approximate Bayesian inference [survey]

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 3, 2021 by xi'an

In connection with the special issue of Entropy I mentioned a while ago, Pierre Alquier (formerly of CREST) has written an introduction to the topic of approximate Bayesian inference that is worth advertising (and freely-available as well). Its reference list is particularly relevant. (The deadline for submissions is 21 June,)

computing Bayes 2.0

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 11, 2020 by xi'an

Our survey paper on “computing Bayes“, written with my friends Gael Martin [who led this project most efficiently!] and David Frazier, has now been revised and resubmitted, the new version being now available on arXiv. Recognising that the entire range of the literature cannot be encompassed within a single review, esp. wrt the theoretical advances made on MCMC, the revised version is more focussed on the approximative solutions (when considering MCMC as “exact”!). As put by one of the referees [which were all very supportive of the paper], “the authors are very brave. To cover in a review paper the computational methods for Bayesian inference is indeed a monumental task and in a way an hopeless one”. This is the opportunity to congratulate Gael on her election to the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia last month. (Along with her colleague from Monash, Rob Hyndman.)

Computing Bayes: Bayesian Computation from 1763 to the 21st Century

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , on April 16, 2020 by xi'an

Last night, Gael Martin, David Frazier (from Monash U) and myself arXived a survey on the history of Bayesian computations. This project started when Gael presented a historical overview of Bayesian computation, then entitled ‘Computing Bayes: Bayesian Computation from 1763 to 2017!’, at ‘Bayes on the Beach’ (Queensland, November, 2017). She then decided to build a survey from the material she had gathered, with her usual dedication and stamina. Asking David and I to join forces and bring additional perspectives on this history. While this is a short and hence necessary incomplete history (of not everything!), it hopefully brings some different threads together in an original enough fashion (as I think there is little overlap with recent surveys I wrote). We welcome comments about aspects we missed, skipped or misrepresented, most obviously!

Rao-Blackwellisation, a review in the making

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 17, 2020 by xi'an

Recently, I have been contacted by a mainstream statistics journal to write a review of Rao-Blackwellisation techniques in computational statistics, in connection with an issue celebrating C.R. Rao’s 100th birthday. As many many techniques can be interpreted as weak forms of Rao-Blackwellisation, as e.g. all auxiliary variable approaches, I am clearly facing an abundance of riches and would thus welcome suggestions from Og’s readers on the major advances in Monte Carlo methods that can be connected with the Rao-Blackwell-Kolmogorov theorem. (On the personal and anecdotal side, I only met C.R. Rao once, in 1988, when he came for a seminar at Purdue University where I was spending the year.)

MCMC, with common misunderstandings

Posted in Books, pictures, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 27, 2020 by xi'an

As I was asked to write a chapter on MCMC methods for an incoming Handbook of Computational Statistics and Data Science, published by Wiley, rather than cautiously declining!, I decided to recycle the answers I wrote on X validated to what I considered to be the most characteristic misunderstandings about MCMC and other computing methods, using as background the introduction produced by Wu Changye in his PhD thesis. Waiting for the opinion of the editors of the Handbook on this Q&A style. The outcome is certainly lighter than other recent surveys like the one we wrote with Peter Green, Krys Latuszinski, and Marcelo Pereyra, for Statistics and Computing, or the one with Victor Elvira, Nick Tawn, and Changye Wu.