Archive for sword and sorcery

the witcher

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 11, 2020 by xi'an

As I read (some of) Andrzej Sapkowski‘s books, and then watched my son play the derived video game, I took the opportunity of the break to watch the eponymous Netflix series. Which I found quite decent and entertaining, given that the books were not unforgettable masterpieces but enjoyable and well-constructed. The New York Times was quite dismissive in its review of the show, seeing as a cheap copycat of Game of Thrones when the books were written earlier than Martin’s unfinished no-end-logy. The Blaviken battle scene in the first episode is certainly on a par with GoT most fighting moments, while lasting a few seconds. And the actor playing Geralt manages to convey much more in a few grunts than, say, Kit Harington’s permanent cocker spaniel sad face!!! The budget here is clearly not the same as HBO’s investment, with some exterior scenes looking a wee bit bare (just as in the BBC’s rendering of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrel). But, again, nothing there to dim the appeal of the series (although they could have cut on the definitely gratuitous softporn moments!) and a plot gradually rising from the fragmented time line and the apparently unrelated subplots, which is also a feature of the books, made of short-stories vaguely glued together. I am hence looking for the second season, hoping the GoT curse does not extend to this series. (Tor.com also published a highly critical review of the show. And of the books, which are incidentally not published by Tor!)

Boring blades [book review]

Posted in Books, Mountains with tags , , , , on June 14, 2015 by xi'an

This fifth volume of the “Blades” fantasy series by Kelly McCullough is entitled Drawn blades but it gives the impression the author has exhausted what she he can seriously drag from the universe she he created a few volumes ago. Even when resuscitating another former lover of the main character. And moving to an unknown part of the world. And bringing in new super-species, cultists, and even a petty god. Yes, a petty god, whining and poorly lying, And an anti-sect police. And a fantasy version of the surfing board. Yes again, a surfing board. Inland. Despite all those unusual features, the book feels like a sluggish copy of a million fantasy books that have mixed the themes of an awakening god awaited by fanatics followers in unlimited subterranean vaults, with the heroes eventually getting the better of the dumb followers and even of the (dumb) god. And boring a grumpy reader to sleep every single evening. The next instalment in the series, Darkened blade, just appeared, but I do not think I will return to Aral’s world again. The earlier volumes were quite enjoyable and recommended. Now comes a time to end the series!