Archive for talks

[de]quarantined by slideshare

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 11, 2021 by xi'an

A follow-up episode to the SlideShare m’a tuer [sic] saga: After the 20 November closure of my xianblog account and my request for an explanation, I was told by Linkedin that a complaint has been made about one of my talks for violation of copyright. Most surprisingly, at least at first, it was about the slides for the graduate lectures I gave ten years ago at CREST on (re)reading Jaynes’ Probability Theory. While the slides contain a lot of short quotes from the Logic of Science, somewhat necessarily since I discuss the said book, there are also many quotes from Jeffreys’ Theory of Probability and “t’is but a scratch” on the contents of this lengthy book… Plus, the pdf file appears to be accessible on several sites, including one with an INRIA domain. Since I had to fill a “Counter-Notice of Copyright Infringement” to unlock the rest of the depository, I just hope no legal action is going to be taken about this lecture. But I remain puzzled at the reasoning behind the complaint, unwilling to blame radical Jaynesians for it! As an aside, here are the registered 736 views of the slides for the past year:

quarantined by slideshare

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on November 26, 2020 by xi'an

Just found out that SlideShare has closed my account for “violating SlideShare Terms of Service”! As I have no further detail (and my xianblog account is inaccessible) I have contacted SlideShare to get an explanation for this inexplicable cancellation and hopefully (??) can argue my case. If not the hundred plus slide presentations that were posted there and linked on the ‘Og will become unavailable. I seem to remember this happened to me once before so maybe there is hope to invert the decision presumably made by an AI using the wrong prior or algorithm!

structure and uncertainty, Bristol, Sept. 27

Posted in pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 28, 2012 by xi'an

The last sessions at the SuSTain workshop. were equally riveting but I alas had to leave early to get a noon flight—as it happens, while I expected to get home early enough to work, run, cook, and do maths with my daughter, my taxi got stuck in an endless traffic jam and I only had time for the maths!—, hence missing the talks by Chris Holmes—second time after Kyoto!—, Sofia Massa, and Arnoldo Frigessi… I am glad I managed to get Michael Newton’s and Forrest Crawford’s talks, though, as Michael presented a highly pedagogical entry to computational concepts related to system biology (a potential candidate for an MCMSki IV talk?) and Forrest discussed some birth-and-death processes, including the Yule process, that allowed for closed form expressions of their Laplace transform via continued fractions. (Continued fractions, one of my favourite mathematical objects!!! Rarely appearing in statistics, though…) I have to check on Forrest’s recent papers to understand how widely this approach applies to philogenetic trees, but this opens a fairly interesting alternative to ABC!

This was a highly enjoyable meeting, first and foremost due to the quality of the talks and of their scheduling, but also by the pleasure of seeing again many friends of many years—notice how I carefully avoided using “old friends”!—, by the relaxed and open atmosphere of the workshop—in the terrific location of Goldney Hall—and of course of unofficially celebrating Peter Green’s deeds and contributions to the field, the profession, and the statistics group in Bristol! Deeds and contributions so far, as I am sure he will keep contributing in many ways in the coming years and decades, as already shown by his committed involvement in the very recent creation of BayesComp. I thus most gladly join the other participants of this workshop both to thank him most sincerely for those many and multifaceted contributions and to wish him all the best for those coming decades!

As an aside, I also enjoyed being “back” in Bristol once again, as I do like the city, the surrounding Somerset countryside, the nearby South Wales, and the wide running possibilities (from the Downs to the Mendip Hills!). While I sampled many great hotels in Bristol and Clifton over the years, I now rank the Avon Gorges Hotel where I stayed this time quite high in the list, both for its convenient (running!) location and its top-quality facilities (incl. high-speed WiFi!)