Archive for the Netherlands

monomial representations on Netflix

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 16, 2021 by xi'an

When watching the first episode of Queen’s Gambit, following the recommendations of my son, I glimpsed the cover of a math thesis defended at Cornell by the mother of the main character..! Prior to 1957, year of her death. Searching a wee bit further, I found that there exists an actual thesis with this very title, albeit defended by Stephen Stanley in 1998 at the University of Birmingham. that is, Birmingham, UK [near Coventry]. Apart from this amusing trivia piece, I also enjoyed watching the first episodes of the series, the main actor being really outstanding in her acting, and the plot unfolding rather nicely, except for the chess games that are unrealistically hurried, presumably because watching people thinking is anathema on TV! The representation of misogyny at the time is however most realistic (I presume|!) and definitely shocking. (The first competition game when Beth Hamon loses is somewhat disappointing as failing to predict a Queen exchange is implausible at this level…) However, the growing self-destructive behaviour of Beth made me cringe to the point of stopping the series. The early episodes also reminded me of the days when my son had started playing chess with me, winning on a regular basis, had then joined a Saturday chess nearby, was moved to the adult section within a few weeks, and … stopped altogether a few weeks later as he (mistakenly) thought the older players were making fun of him!!! He never got to any competitive level but still plays on a regular basis and trashes me just as regularly. Coincidence or not, the Guardian has a “scandalous” chess story to relate last week,  when the Dutch champion defeated the world top two players, with one game won by him having prepared the Najdorf Sicilian opening up to the 17th round! (The chess problem below is from the same article but relates to Antonio Medina v Svetozar Gligoric, Palma 1968.)

CHANCE on modern slavery

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics with tags , , , , on December 23, 2017 by xi'an

Just to mention the latest issue of CHANCE dedicated to the statistical issues related with slavery, edited in collaboration with the Walk Free Foundation. (I remember discussing the possibility of such an issue at the CHANCE editors meeting at JSM, Boston. I also remember Bernard Silverman discussing the case as Senior Scientist to the UK Government.) Difficulties range from defining slavery, to estimating the number of slaves, for instance by capture-mark-recapture methods. to designing ways to protect against slavery. (A stunning figure is the estimated 180,000 slaves in Poland and 20,000 in The Netherlands…)

YES IX [Eurandom, 7-9 March 2018]

Posted in Kids with tags , , , on December 7, 2017 by xi'an

Just to relay an announcement for a workshop for young European statisticians (YES), that will take place at Eurandom, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, from March 7 till March 9, with Quentin Berthet, David Dunson, and Jianquing Fan, as tutorial speakers. I actually attended one of these workshops a while ago (2009!), along with a postdoc at CREST, but have few memories of it. Except a wide spectrum of talks and a diverse audience. The theme is “Scalable Statistics: on Accuracy and Computational Complexity”.