Archive for United Kingdom

flash mournings

Posted in pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on September 11, 2022 by xi'an


While I was in Warwick for the 50th anniversary of the department, Elizabeth II passed away. The item of news permeated quite slowly, as it was not even mentioned during the conference dinner. While institutions (like the University, above, with a picture of her visiting the campus in 1970, prior to the department creation) and companies (like this Birmingham airport shop, below) started posting announcements, and the media went full blast, both in Britain and in France, I did not notice much of a reaction on the following day while I traveled back to Paris (with huge delays due to the meteorology, rather than to the monarchy). Which makes the offer of support we got from the University

For many, this will be an emotional time so please do talk to others if you need any support. Our Wellbeing Support Services, the team at the Employee Assistance Programme, and our multi-faith Chaplaincy are available to help you during this period.

the more puzzling.

another duh infographic

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on June 11, 2022 by xi'an

REF 2021

Posted in Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 14, 2022 by xi'an

Big Bayes postdoctoral position in Oxford [UK]

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2022 by xi'an

Forwarding a call for postdoctoral applications from Prof Judith Rousseau, with deadline 30 March:

Seeking a Postdoctoral Research Assistant, to join our group at the Department of Statistics. The Postdoctoral Research Assistant will be carrying out research for the ERC project General Theory for Big Bayes, reporting to Professor Judith Rousseau. They will provide guidance to junior members of the research group such as PhD students, and/or project volunteers.

The aim of this project is to develop a general theory for the analysis of Bayesian methods in complex and high (or infinite) dimensional models which will cover not only fine understanding of the posterior distributions but also an analysis of the output of the algorithms used to implement the approaches. The main objectives of the project are (briefly): 1) Asymptotic analysis of the posterior distribution of complex high dimensional models 2) Interactions between the asymptotic theory of high dimensional posterior distributions and computational complexity. We will also enrich these theoretical developments by 3) strongly related domains of applications, namely neuroscience, terrorism and crimes, and ecology.

The postholder will hold or be close to completion of a PhD/DPhil in statistics together with relevant experience. They will have the ability to manage own academic research and associated activities and have previous experience of contributing to publications/presentations. They will contribute ideas for new research projects and research income generation. Ideally, the postholder will also have experience in theoretical properties of Bayesian procedures and/or approximate Bayesian methods.

Scrapping Covid surveillance study would put public health at risk [by Silvia Richardson]

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2022 by xi'an

Royal Statistical Society president (and very dear friend) Sylvia Richardson published this tribune in the Guardian defending the preservation of a national surveillance system last week:

Sajid Javid is right to argue against scrapping the Office for National Statistics’ Covid surveillance study. Throughout the pandemic, national surveillance studies have provided invaluable information to support decision-making.

For any real-time health surveillance system to be reliable and cost-effective, it cannot rely solely on self-reported tests. These data sets are likely to be biased, as it is impossible to know how many people are also reporting their negative results and, if tests start to come with a cost, how many people simply aren’t testing. If we are to get reliable information about the prevalence of Covid, it is essential to maintain studies such as the ONS’s and React to allow statisticians to estimate infectiousness and the proportion of the population who are infected (including those without symptoms), as well as to identify new variants.

Abrupt disruption of a surveillance system is wasteful, will make tracking of prevalence meaningless and will put in jeopardy the future health of the public. If important surveillance studies must be scaled down, this cannot be led by arbitrary cost-cutting targets, but should be led by statisticians to ensure that studies continue to provide reliable information.

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