Archive for University of California

two ISBA meetings in 2022

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 11, 2021 by xi'an

As in 2019, both the O’Bayes and BNP conferences will occur the same year, if not back-to-back as in 2019 (when they were in neighbouring Oxford and Warwick, respectively). To quote from the current Chair of the OBayes section of ISBA, my friend Gonzalo,

“the next International Workshop on Objective Bayes Methodology (O-Bayes, OBayes, O’Bayes, Ohhh Bayes,..) is scheduled for September 2022 from 7th (Wed) to 10th (Sat) and will be hosted by University of California, Santa Cruz. This will be the 14th meeting of one of the longest-running and preeminent meetings in Bayesian statistics (the 1st was in USA 1996; the last one in 2019 in UK). In this conference, we will be celebrating the 70th birthday of Luis Pericchi an extraordinary person who has been very influential in the successful development of OBayesian ideas.”

thus seeing the O’Bayes meeting taking place in North America in early Fall, followed by BNP 13 in South America a month later (and thus Spring!), quoting from Alessandra Guglielmi:

“Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the 13th World Meeting on Bayesian Nonparametrics (BNP Workshop) is postponed until 2022. The meeting is currently scheduled to take place in Puerto Varas, Chile, October 24-28, 2022.”

El lago Llanquihue, con el volcán Osorno al fondo Yuri de Mesquita Bar / Getty Images/iStockphoto

 

Nature tea[dbits]

Posted in Books, pictures, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2019 by xi'an

A very special issue of Nature (7 February 2019, vol. 556, no. 7742). With an outlook section on tea, plus a few research papers (and ads) on my principal beverage. News about the REF, Elsevier’s and Huawei’s woes with the University of California, the dangerous weakening of Title IX by the Trump administration, and a long report on the statistical analysis of Hurricane Maria deaths, involving mostly epidemiologists, but also Patrick Ball who took part in our Bayes for Good workshop at CIRM. Plus China’s food crisis and ways to reduce cropland losses and food waste. Concerning the tea part(y), a philogenetic study of different samples led to the theory that tea was domesticated thrice, twice in Yunnan (China) and once in Assam (India), with a divergence estimated at more than twenty thousand years ago. Another article on Pu-Ehr, with the potential impacts of climate change on this very unique tea. With a further remark that higher altitudes increase the anti-oxydant level of tea… And a fascinating description of agro-forestry where tea and vegetables are grown in a forest that regulates sun exposure, moisture evaporation, and soil nutrients.