Archive for University of Helsinki

deep and embarrassingly parallel MCMC

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on April 9, 2019 by xi'an

Diego Mesquita, Paul Blomstedt, and Samuel Kaski (from Helsinki, like the above picture) just arXived a paper on embarrassingly parallel MCMC. Following a series of papers discussed on this ‘og in the past. They use a deep learning approach of Dinh et al. (2017) to the computation of the probability density of a convoluted and non-volume-preserving transform of a given random variable to turn multiple samples from sub-posteriors [corresponding to the k k-th roots of the true posterior] into a sample from the true posterior. If I understand correctly the argument [on page 4], the deep neural network provides a density estimate that apparently does better than traditional non-parametric density estimates. Maybe by being more efficient than a Parzen-Rosenblat estimator which is of order the number of simulations… For any value of θ, the estimate of the true target is the product of these estimates and for a value of θ simulated from one of the subposteriors an importance weight naturally ensues. However, for a one-dimensional transform of θ, h(θ), I would prefer estimating first the density of h(θ) for each sample and then construct an importance weight. If only to avoid the curse of dimension.

On various benchmarks, like the banana-shaped 2D target above, the proposed method (NAP) does better. Even in relatively high dimensions. Given that the overall computing times are not produced, with only the calibration that the same number of subsamples were produced for all methods, it would be interesting to test the same performances on even higher dimensions and larger population sizes.

European statistics in Finland [EMS17]

Posted in Books, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 2, 2017 by xi'an

While this European meeting of statisticians had a wide range of talks and topics, I found it to be more low key than the previous one I attended in Budapest, maybe because there was hardly any talk there in applied probability. (But there were some sessions in mathematical statistics and Mark Girolami gave a great entry to differential geometry and MCMC, in the spirit of his 2010 discussion paper. Using our recent trip to Montréal as an example of geodesic!) In the Bayesian software session [organised by Aki Vetahri], Javier Gonzáles gave a very neat introduction to Bayesian optimisation: he showed how optimisation can be turned into Bayesian inference or more specifically as a Bayesian decision problem using a loss function related to the problem of interest. The point in following a Bayesian path [or probabilist numerics] is to reduce uncertainty by the medium of prior measures on functions, although resorting [as usual] to Gaussian processes whose arbitrariness I somehow dislike within the infinity of priors (aka stochastic processes) on functions! One of his strong arguments was that the approach includes the possibility for design in picking the next observation point (as done in some ABC papers of Michael Guttman and co-authors, incl. the following talk at EMS 2017) but again the devil may be in the implementation when looking at minimising an objective function… The notion of the myopia of optimisation techniques was another good point: only looking one step ahead in the future diminishes the returns of the optimisation and an alternative presented at AISTATS 2016 [that I do not remember seeing in Càdiz] goes against this myopia.

Umberto Piccini also gave a talk on exploiting synthetic likelihoods in a Bayesian fashion (in connection with the talk he gave last year at MCqMC 2016). I wondered at the use of INLA for this Gaussian representation, as well as at the impact of the parameterisation of the summary statistics. And the session organised by Jean-Michel involved Jimmy Olson, Murray Pollock (Warwick) and myself, with great talks from both other speakers, on PaRIS and PaRISian algorithms by Jimmy, and on a wide range of exact simulation methods of continuous time processes by Murray, both managing to convey the intuition behind their results and avoiding the massive mathematics at work there. By comparison, I must have been quite unclear during my talk since someone interrupted me about how Owen & Zhou (2000) justified their deterministic mixture importance sampling representation. And then left when I could not make sense of his questions [or because it was lunchtime already].