Archive for University of Oxford

afternoon on Bayesian computation

Posted in Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 6, 2016 by xi'an

Richard Everitt organises an afternoon workshop on Bayesian computation in Reading, UK, on April 19, the day before the Estimating Constant workshop in Warwick, following a successful afternoon last year. Here is the programme:

1230-1315  Antonietta Mira, Università della Svizzera italiana
1315-1345  Ingmar Schuster, Université Paris-Dauphine
1345-1415  Francois-Xavier Briol, University of Warwick
1415-1445  Jack Baker, University of Lancaster
1445-1515  Alexander Mihailov, University of Reading
1515-1545  Coffee break
1545-1630  Arnaud Doucet, University of Oxford
1630-1700  Philip Maybank, University of Reading
1700-1730  Elske van der Vaart, University of Reading
1730-1800  Reham Badawy, Aston University
1815-late  Pub and food (SCR, UoR campus)

and the general abstract:

The Bayesian approach to statistical inference has seen major successes in the past twenty years, finding application in many areas of science, engineering, finance and elsewhere. The main drivers of these successes were developments in Monte Carlo methods and the wide availability of desktop computers. More recently, the use of standard Monte Carlo methods has become infeasible due the size and complexity of data now available. This has been countered by the development of next-generation Monte Carlo techniques, which are the topic of this meeting.

The meeting takes place in the Nike Lecture Theatre, Agriculture Building [building number 59].

comments on Watson and Holmes

Posted in Statistics, Books, Travel, pictures with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 1, 2016 by xi'an


“The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.” The Hound of the Baskervilles

In connection with the incoming publication of James Watson’s and Chris Holmes’ Approximating models and robust decisions in Statistical Science, Judith Rousseau and I wrote a discussion on the paper that has been arXived yesterday.

“Overall, we consider that the calibration of the Kullback-Leibler divergence remains an open problem.” (p.18)

While the paper connects with earlier ones by Chris and coauthors, and possibly despite the overall critical tone of the comments!, I really appreciate the renewed interest in robustness advocated in this paper. I was going to write Bayesian robustness but to differ from the perspective adopted in the 90’s where robustness was mostly about the prior, I would say this is rather a Bayesian approach to model robustness from a decisional perspective. With definitive innovations like considering the impact of posterior uncertainty over the decision space, uncertainty being defined e.g. in terms of Kullback-Leibler neighbourhoods. Or with a Dirichlet process distribution on the posterior. This may step out of the standard Bayesian approach but it remains of definite interest! (And note that this discussion of ours [reluctantly!] refrained from capitalising on the names of the authors to build easy puns linked with the most Bayesian of all detectives!)

snapshots of Oxford Statistics

Posted in Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , on February 29, 2016 by xi'an

Following the opening of the new Department of Statistics building in Oxford [which somewhat ironically is the former Department of Mathematics!], a professional photographer was commissioned for a photo cover of this move. Which is incidentally fantastic for the cohesion and work quality of the department, when compared with the former configuration in two disconnected buildings on South Parks Road. Not mentioning the vis-à-vis with Eagle and Child.

As the photographer happened to be there the very day I was teaching my Bayesian module for the OxWaSP PhD students, I ended up in some of the photographs (with no clear memory of this photographer, who was most unintrusive). With my Racoon River Brewing Co. tee-shirt I brought back from Des Moines. And was wearing in a very indirect allusion to the US primaries the night before!

snapshot from Oxford [#2]

Posted in Kids, pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , , on February 9, 2016 by xi'an

Oxford snapshot

Posted in pictures, Running, Travel, University life with tags , , , on February 2, 2016 by xi'an

off to Oxford

Posted in Kids, pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on January 31, 2016 by xi'an

Oxford, Feb. 23, 2012I am off to Oxford this evening for teaching once again in the Bayesian module of the OxWaSP programme. Joint PhD programme between Oxford and Warwick, supported by the EPSRC. And with around a dozen new [excellent!] PhD students every year. Here are the slides of a longer course that I will use in the coming days:

And by popular request (!) here is the heading of my Beamer file:

\documentclass[xcolor=dvipsnames,professionalfonts]{beamer}
\usepackage{colordvi}
\usetheme{Montpellier}
\usecolortheme{beaver}
% Rather be using my own color
\definecolor{LightGrey}{rgb}{0.84,0.83,0.83}
\definecolor{LightYell}{rgb}{0.90,0.83,0.70}
\definecolor{StroYell}{rgb}{0.95,0.88,0.72}
\definecolor{myem}{rgb}{0.797,0.598,0.598}
\definecolor{lightred}{rgb}{0.75,0.033,0}
\definecolor{shadecolor1}{rgb}{0.90,0.83,0.70}
\setbeamercovered{transparent=20}
\setbeamercolor{structure}{fg=myem!120}
\setbeamercolor{alerted text}{fg=lightred}
\setbeamertemplate{blocks}[rounded][shadow=true]

métro static

Posted in Kids, Statistics, Travel with tags , , , , , , on July 19, 2015 by xi'an

[In the train shuttle at Birmingham airport, two young guys, maybe back from SPA 2015, discussing signal processing:]

– In Bayesian statistics, they use a different approach to testing hypotheses… You see, they put priors on the different hypotheses…

– But in the end it all boils down to concentration inequalities…

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