Archive for UTSA

[more] impressions from the frontier

Posted in Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , on March 20, 2010 by xi'an

Apart from my (theoretical) Bayes factor session, I attended non-parametric, and two other Bayes factor sessions  at Frontiers of Statistical Decision Making and Bayesian Analysis today! (I forgot to mention the talk of Kenneth Rice yesterday that related to my early 1990’s work with George Casella and Juinn Hwang on integrating estimation loss functions into testing losses). I liked very much Ed George’s extension of the g-prior, as well as Elias Moreno’s prior modelling of clustering models (along with Guido Consonni’s and Adrian Raftery’s talks in the same session). As commented by many participants to the conference, one major difficulty was to figure out which of the three parallel sessions to choose…  The plenary sessions were superb as well, with Steve Fienberg describing an analysis of a highly (highly) complex model on aging, and Persi Diaconis giving us the flavour of his lastest work with David Aldous on quasi-exchangeability, with exctracts from de Finetti.

on of the g-prior, as well as Elias Moreno’s prior modelling of clustering models (along with Guido Consonni’s and Adrian Raftery’s talks in the same session).

Impressions from the frontier

Posted in Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , on March 19, 2010 by xi'an

The first day of the conference Frontiers of Statistical Decision Making and Bayesian Analysis, in honour of Jim Berger, in San Antonio, was quite a day! Starting at 8:30am with a few welcoming talks, we ended up with a poster session till 7pm. The great thing about the theme of that conference is that basically every talk of every session has some degree of relevance for most participants (besides the fact that most people are already acquainted). For instance, most talks I went to today were connected to Bayesian testing, including a plenary session by Larry Brown on the (non-Bayesian) incorporation of the consequences of model selection into the final inference. (I obviously missed two thirds of the talks, but so did everyone, including Jim Berger whose sessions were allocated at random by an R program!) The program is even heavier tomorrow with talks starting at 8pm!