Archive for workshop

off to Vancouver

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 7, 2019 by xi'an

Today I am flying to Vancouver for an ABC workshop, the second Symposium on Advances in Approximate Bayesian Inference, which is a pre-NeurIPS workshop following five earlier editions, to some of which I took part. With an intense and exciting programme. Not attending the following NeurIPS as I had not submitted any paper (and was not considering relying on a lottery!). Instead, I will give a talk at ABC UBC on Monday 4pm, as, coincidence, coincidence!, I was independently invited by UBC to the IAM-PIMS Distinguished Colloquium series. Speaking on ABC on a broader scale than in the workshop. Where I will focus on ABC-Gibbs. (With alas no time for climbing, missing an opportunity for a winter attempt at The Stawamus Chief!)

probabilistic methods in computational statistics [workshop]

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 5, 2019 by xi'an

A  one-day workshop is organised at Telecom Sudparis, Évry, on 22 November by R. Douc, F. Portier and F. Roueff. On the “hot topics” concerned with probabilistic methods in computational statistics. The workshop is funded by the project “Big-Pomm”, which strengthens the links between LTCI (Telecom Paristech) and SAMOVAR (Telecom Sudparis) around research projects implying partially observed Markov models. The participation to the workshop is free but registration is required for having access to the lunch buffet (40 participants max). (Évry is located 20km south of Paris, with trains on the RER C line.)

ABC in Svalbard, April 12-13 2021

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 4, 2019 by xi'an

This post is a very preliminary announcement that Jukka Corander, Judith Rousseau and myself are planning an ABC in Svalbard workshop in 2021, on 12-13 April, following the “ABC in…” franchise that started in 2009 in Paris… It would be great to hear expressions of interest from potential participants towards scaling the booking accordingly. (While this is a sequel to the highly productive ABCruise of two years ago, between Helsinki and Stockholm, the meeting will take place in Longyearbyen, Svalbard, and participants will have to fly there from either Oslo or Tromsø, Norway, As boat cruises from Iceland or Greenland start later in the year. Note also that in mid-April, being 80⁰ North, Svalbard enjoys more than 18 hours of sunlight and that the average temperature last April was -3.9⁰C with a high of 4⁰C.) The scientific committee should be constituted very soon, but we already welcome proposals for sessions (and sponsoring, quite obviously!).

off to SimStat2019, Salzburg

Posted in Mountains, Running, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 2, 2019 by xi'an

Today, I am off to Salzburg for the SimStat 2019 workshop, or more formally the 10th International Workshop on Simulation and Statistics, where I give a talk on ABC. The program of the workshop is quite diverse and rich and so I do not think I will have time to take advantage of the Hohe Tauern or the Berchtesgaden Alps to go climbing. Especially since I am also discussing papers in an ABC session.

Stein’s method in machine learning [workshop]

Posted in pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 5, 2019 by xi'an

There will be an ICML workshop on Stein’s method in machine learning & statistics, next July 14 or 15, located in Long Beach, CA. Organised by François-Xavier Briol (formerly Warwick), Lester Mckey, Chris Oates (formerly Warwick), Qiang Liu, and Larry Golstein. To quote from the webpage of the workshop

Stein’s method is a technique from probability theory for bounding the distance between probability measures using differential and difference operators. Although the method was initially designed as a technique for proving central limit theorems, it has recently caught the attention of the machine learning (ML) community and has been used for a variety of practical tasks. Recent applications include goodness-of-fit testing, generative modeling, global non-convex optimisation, variational inference, de novo sampling, constructing powerful control variates for Monte Carlo variance reduction, and measuring the quality of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms.

Speakers include Anima Anandkumar, Lawrence Carin, Louis Chen, Andrew Duncan, Arthur Gretton, and Susan Holmes. I am quite sorry to miss two workshops dedicated to Stein’s work in a row, the other one being at NUS, Singapore, around the Stein paradox.

the future of conferences

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 22, 2019 by xi'an

The last issue of Nature for 2018 offers a stunning collection of science photographs, ten portraits of people who mattered (for the editorial board of Nature), and a collection of journalists’ entries on scientific conferences. The later point leading to interesting questioning on the future of conferences, some of which relate to earlier entries on this blog. Like attempts to make them having a lesser carbon footprint, by only attending focused conferences and workshops, warning about predatory ones, creating local hives on different continents that can partake of all talks but reduce travel and size and still allow for exchanges person to person, multiply the meetings and opportunities around a major conference to induce “only” one major trip (as in the past summer of British conferences, or the incoming geographical combination of BNP and O’Bayes 2019), cut the traditional dreary succession of short talks in parallel in favour of “unconferences” where participants set communally the themes and  structure of the meeting (but ware the dangers of bias brought by language, culture, seniority!). Of course, this move towards new formats will meet opposition from several corners, including administrators who too often see conferences as a pretense for paid vacations and refuse supporting costs without a “concrete” proof of work in the form of a presentation.Another aspect of conference was discussed there, namely the art of delivering great talks. Which is indeed more an art than a science, since the impact will not only depend on the speaker and the slides, but also on the audience and the circumstances. As years pile on, I am getting less stressed and probably too relaxed about giving talks, but still rarely feel I have reached toward enough of the audience. And still falling too easily for the infodump mistake… Which reminds me of a recent column in Significance (although I cannot link to it!), complaining about “finding it hard or impossible to follow many presentations, particularly those that involved a large number of equations.” Which sounds strange to me as on the opposite I quickly loose track in talks with no equations. And as mathematical statistics or probability issues seems to imply the use of maths symbols and equations. (This reminded me of a short course I gave once in a undisclosed location, where a portion of the audience left after the first morning, due to my use of “too many Greek letters”.) Actually, I am always annoyed at apologies for using proper maths notations, since they are the tools of our trade.Another entry of importance in this issue of Nature is an interview with Katherine Heller and Hal Daumé, as first chairs for diversity and inclusion at N[eur]IPS. Where they discuss the actions taken since the previous NIPS 2017 meeting to address the lack of inclusiveness and the harassment cases exposed there, first by Kristian Lum, Lead Statistician at the Human Rights Data Analysis Group (HRDAG), whose blog denunciation set the wheels turning towards a safer and better environment (in stats as well as machine-learning). This included the [last minute] move towards renaming the conference as NeuroIPS to avoid sexual puns on the former acronym (which as a non-native speaker I missed until it was pointed out to me!). Judging from the feedback it seems that the wheels have indeed turned a significant amount and hopefully will continue its progress.

off to Luminy for a second Bayesian week

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 23, 2018 by xi'an