Archive for Xi’an

xi’an’s number [repost]

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , on August 18, 2019 by xi'an

spotlight on Xi’an!

Posted in pictures with tags , , , , on November 24, 2018 by xi'an

Xi’an cuisine [Xi’an series]

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 26, 2017 by xi'an

David Frazier sent me a picture of another Xi’an restaurant he found near the campus of Monash University. If this CNN webpage on the ten best dishes in Xi’an is to be believed, this will be a must-go restaurant for my next visit to Melbourne! Especially when reading there that Xi’an claims to have xiaolongbao (soup dumplings) that are superior to those in Shanghai!!! (And when considering that I once went on a xiaolongbao rampage in downtown Melbourne.

snapshot from Montréal [Xi’an series]

Posted in Kids, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , on December 11, 2015 by xi'an

World statistics day

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 20, 2015 by xi'an

Today is October 20, World Statistics Day as launched by the UN. And supported by local and international societies. In connection with that day, among many events, the RSS will be hosting a reception, China will hold a seminar in… Xi’an, how appropriate!, my friend Kerrie Mengersen will give a talk at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) on The power and promise of immersive virtual environments. (Bringing her pet crocodile to the talk, hopefully!)

Leuven9And I will also give a talk in Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, on Le délicat dilemme des tests d’hypothèse et de leur résolution bayésienne. At ISBA, which stands for Institute of Statistics, Biostatistics and Actuarial Sciences and not for the Bayesian society!. within UCL, which stands for Université Catholique de Louvain and not for University College London! (And which is not to be confused with the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, in Leuven, where I was last year for MCqMC. About 25 kilometers away.) In case this is not confusing enough, here are my slides (in English, while the talk will be in French):

the universe in zero words

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 30, 2012 by xi'an

The universe in zero words: The story of mathematics as told through equations is a book with a very nice cover: in case you cannot see the details on the picture, what looks like stars on a bright night sky are actually equations discussed in the book (plus actual stars!)…

The universe in zero words is written by Dana Mackenzie (check his website!) and published by Princeton University Press. (I received it in the mail from John Wiley for review, prior to its publication on May 16, nice!) It reads well and quick: I took it with me in the métro one morning and was half-way through it the same evening, as the universe in zero words remains on the light side, esp. for readers with a high-school training in math. The book strongly reminded me (at times) of my high school years and of my fascination for Cardano’s formula and the non-Euclidean geometries. I was also reminded of studying quaternions for a short while as an undergraduate by the (arguably superfluous) chapter on Hamilton. So a pleasant if unsurprising read, with a writing style that is not always at its best, esp. after reading Bill Bryson’s “Seeing Further: The Story of Science, Discovery, and the Genius of the Royal Society“, and a book unlikely to bring major epiphanies to the mathematically inclined. If well-documented, free of typos, and engaging into some mathematical details (accepting to go against the folk rule that “For every equation you put in, you will lose half of your audience.” already mentioned in Diaconis and Graham’s book). With alas a fundamental omission: no trace is found therein of Bayes’ formula! (The very opposite of Bryson’s introduction, who could have arguably stayed away from it.) The closest connection with statistics is the final chapter on the Black-Scholes equation, which does not say much about probability…. It is of course the major difficulty with the exercise of picking 24 equations out of the history of maths and physics that some major and influential equations had to be set aside… Maybe the error was in covering (or trying to cover) formulas from physics as well as from maths. Now, rather paradoxically (?) I learned more from the physics chapters: for instance, the chapters on Maxwell’s, Einstein’s, and Dirac’s formulae are very well done. The chapter on the fundamental theorem of calculus is also appreciable.

Continue reading

People to People

Posted in Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , on June 19, 2010 by xi'an

I found in my mailbox today a very surprising mail from Sastry Pantula, current president of the ASA, inviting me to participate in a delegation of statisticians to China. (Most likely, the ASA first computed the expected response rate to this letter and multiplied the number of invitations accordingly!) The goal of this 12 day trip to China is to “explore matters of common interest regarding the development of statistical capacity in the workforce and statistical literacy in the general population. Delegates will learn about statistical literacy efforts in China, how statisticians are trained, and what statistical methods are found to be particularly useful in industry and agriculture.”  Delegates are also supposed to fund their own trip at an estimated cost of $5,495… What I find surprising is that a large professional and highly active society like ASA engages into this kind of very old-fashioned and dubiously profitable tradition of delegations, especially when considering the large amount of U.S. statisticians with Chinese origins who are presumably most aware of the possible links between statisticians from both countries. (Of course, missing a visit to Xi’an is a shame, but I hope to go there next year for the O’Bayes 2011 meeting, even Shanghai and Xi’an are not that close…) But I may obviously be missing an important feature of those People to People Citizen Ambassador Programs I have never heard of previously!