independent random sampling methods [book review]

Last week, I had the pleasant surprise to receive a copy of this book in the mail. Book that I was not aware had been written or published (meaning that I was not involved in its review!). The three authors, Luca Martino, David Luengo, and Joaquín Míguez, of Independent Random Sampling Methods are from Madrid universities and I have read (and posted on) several of their papers on (population) Monte Carlo simulation in the recent years. Including Luca’s survey of multiple try MCMC which was helpful in writing our WIREs own survey.

The book is a pedagogical coverage of most algorithms used to simulate independent samples from a given distribution, which of course recoups some of the techniques exposed with more details by [another] Luc, namely Luc Devroye’s Non-uniform random variate generation bible, often mentioned here (and studied in uttermost details by a dedicated reading group in Warwick). It includes a whole chapter on accept-reject methods, with in particular a section on Payne-Dagpunar’s band rejection I had not seen previously. And another entire chapter on ratio-of-uniforms techniques. On which the three authors had proposed generalisations [covered by the book], years before I attempted to go the same way, having completely forgotten reading their paper at the time… Or the much earlier 1991 paper by Jon Wakefield, Alan Gelfand and Adrian Smith!

The book also covers the “vertical density representation”, due to Troutt (1991), which consists in considering the distribution of the density p(.) of the random variable X as a random variable, p(X). I remember pondering about this alternative to the cdf transform and giving up on it as the outcome has a distribution depending on p, even when the density is monotonous. Even though I am not certain from reading the section that this is particularly appealing…

Given its title, the book contains very little about MCMC. Except for a last and final chapter that covers adaptive independent Metropolis-Hastings algorithms, in connection with some of the authors’ recent work. Like multiple try Metropolis. Relating to the (unidimensional) ARMS “ancestor” of adaptive MCMC methods. (As noted in a recent blog on Holden et al., 2009 , I have trouble understanding how recycling only rejected proposed values to build a better proposal distribution is enough to guarantee convergence of an adaptive algorithm, but the book does not delve much into this convergence.)

All in all and with the bias induced by me working in the very area, I find the book quite a nice entry on the topic, which can be used in a Monte Carlo course at both undergraduate and graduate levels if one want to avoid going into Markov chains. It is certainly less likely to scare students away than the comprehensive Non-uniform random variate generation and on the opposite may induce some of them to pursue a research career in this domain.

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