Archive for Springer-Verlag

independent random sampling methods [book review]

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 16, 2018 by xi'an

Last week, I had the pleasant surprise to receive a copy of this book in the mail. Book that I was not aware had been written or published (meaning that I was not involved in its review!). The three authors, Luca Martino, David Luengo, and Joaquín Míguez, of Independent Random Sampling Methods are from Madrid universities and I have read (and posted on) several of their papers on (population) Monte Carlo simulation in the recent years. Including Luca’s survey of multiple try MCMC which was helpful in writing our WIREs own survey.

The book is a pedagogical coverage of most algorithms used to simulate independent samples from a given distribution, which of course recoups some of the techniques exposed with more details by [another] Luc, namely Luc Devroye’s Non-uniform random variate generation bible, often mentioned here (and studied in uttermost details by a dedicated reading group in Warwick). It includes a whole chapter on accept-reject methods, with in particular a section on Payne-Dagpunar’s band rejection I had not seen previously. And another entire chapter on ratio-of-uniforms techniques. On which the three authors had proposed generalisations [covered by the book], years before I attempted to go the same way, having completely forgotten reading their paper at the time… Or the much earlier 1991 paper by Jon Wakefield, Alan Gelfand and Adrian Smith!

The book also covers the “vertical density representation”, due to Troutt (1991), which consists in considering the distribution of the density p(.) of the random variable X as a random variable, p(X). I remember pondering about this alternative to the cdf transform and giving up on it as the outcome has a distribution depending on p, even when the density is monotonous. Even though I am not certain from reading the section that this is particularly appealing…

Given its title, the book contains very little about MCMC. Except for a last and final chapter that covers adaptive independent Metropolis-Hastings algorithms, in connection with some of the authors’ recent work. Like multiple try Metropolis. Relating to the (unidimensional) ARMS “ancestor” of adaptive MCMC methods. (As noted in a recent blog on Holden et al., 2009 , I have trouble understanding how recycling only rejected proposed values to build a better proposal distribution is enough to guarantee convergence of an adaptive algorithm, but the book does not delve much into this convergence.)

All in all and with the bias induced by me working in the very area, I find the book quite a nice entry on the topic, which can be used in a Monte Carlo course at both undergraduate and graduate levels if one want to avoid going into Markov chains. It is certainly less likely to scare students away than the comprehensive Non-uniform random variate generation and on the opposite may induce some of them to pursue a research career in this domain.

Springer no more!

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on April 4, 2018 by xi'an

Just learned that, starting from tomorrow night, I will not have access to any of the Springer journals, as the negotiations between the consortium of French universities, research institutes, higher educations schools, and museums, failed. The commercial published refusing to stem the ever increasing fees, while happily taking in the fast increasing open access fees it pressures from authors, a unique example of triple taxation (researchers’ salaries, open access duties, and enormous non-negotiable subscription rates for the whole package of journals)… Following their German counterparts. Well, this is an opportunity for the boards of all these journals to withdraw and create the phantom version of their formal journal, evaluating and reviewing papers already available on arXiv! And I should definitely get my acts together, rise from my winter-is-coming lethargy, and launch PCI Comput Stat now!!!

Statistics & Computing [toc]

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , on June 29, 2016 by xi'an

6The latest [June] issue of Statistics & Computing is full of interesting Bayesian and Monte Carlo entries, some of which are even open access!

 

Bayesian statistics from methods to models and applications

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , on July 5, 2015 by xi'an

A Springer book published in conjunction with the great BAYSM 2014 conference in Wien last year has now appeared. Here is the table of contents:

  • Bayesian Survival Model Based on Moment Characterization by Arbel, Julyan et al.
  • A New Finite Approximation for the NGG Mixture Model: An Application to Density Estimation by Bianchini, Ilaria
  • Distributed Estimation of Mixture Model by Dedecius, Kamil et al.
  • Jeffreys’ Priors for Mixture Estimation by Grazian, Clara and X
  • A Subordinated Stochastic Process Model by Palacios, Ana Paula et al.
  • Bayesian Variable Selection for Generalized Linear Models Using the Power-Conditional-Expected-Posterior Prior by Perrakis, Konstantinos et al.
  • Application of Interweaving in DLMs to an Exchange and Specialization Experiment by Simpson, Matthew
  • On Bayesian Based Adaptive Confidence Sets for Linear Functionals by Szabó, Botond
  • Identifying the Infectious Period Distribution for Stochastic Epidemic Models Using the Posterior Predictive Check by Alharthi, Muteb et al.
  • A New Strategy for Testing Cosmology with Simulations by Killedar, Madhura et al.
  • Formal and Heuristic Model Averaging Methods for Predicting the US Unemployment Rate by Kolly, Jeremy
  • Bayesian Estimation of the Aortic Stiffness based on Non-invasive Computed Tomography Images by Lanzarone, Ettore et al.
  • Bayesian Filtering for Thermal Conductivity Estimation Given Temperature Observations by Martín-Fernández, Laura et al.
  • A Mixture Model for Filtering Firms’ Profit Rates by Scharfenaker, Ellis et al.

Enjoy!

Introduction to Monte Carlo methods with R and Bayesian Essentials with R

Posted in Books, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , on June 26, 2015 by xi'an

sales1Here are the  download figures for my e-book with George as sent to me last week by my publisher Springer-Verlag.  With an interesting surge in the past year. Maybe simply due to new selling strategies of the published rather to a wider interest in the book. (My royalties have certainly not increased!) Anyway thanks to all readers. As an aside for wordpress wannabe bloggers, I realised it is now almost impossible to write tables with WordPress, another illustration of the move towards small-device-supported blogs. Along with a new annoying “simpler” (or more accurately dumber) interface and a default font far too small for my eyesight. So I advise alternatives to wordpress that are more sympathetic to maths contents (e.g., using MathJax) and comfortable editing.

salesBessAnd the same for the e-book with Jean-Michel, which only appeared in late 2013. And contains more chapters than Introduction to Monte Carlo methods with R. Incidentally, a reader recently pointed out to me the availability of a pirated version of The Bayesian Choice on a Saudi (religious) university website. And of a pirated version of Introducing Monte Carlo with R on a Saõ Paulo (Brazil) university website. This may be alas inevitable, given the diffusion by publishers of e-chapters that can be copied with no limitations…

solution manual for Bayesian Essentials with R

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , on March 18, 2015 by xi'an

The solution manual to our Bayesian Essentials with R has just been arXived. If I link this completion with the publication date of the book itself, it sure took an unreasonable time to come out and sadly with no obvious reason or even less justification for the delay… Given the large overlap with the solution manual of the previous edition, Bayesian Core, this version should have been completed much much earlier but, paradoxically if in-line with the lengthy completion of the book istelf, this previous manual is one of the causes for the delay, as we thought the overlap allowed for self-study readers to check some of the exercises. Prodded by Hannah Bracken from Springer-Verlag, and unable to hire an assistant towards this task, I eventually decided to spend the few days required to clean up this solution manual, with the unintentional help from my sorry excuse for an Internet provider who accidentally cutting my home connection for a whole week so far…!

solmanIn the course of writing solutions, I stumbled upon one inexplicably worded exercise about the Lemer-Schur algorithm for testing stationarity, exercise that I had to rewrite from scratch. Apologies to any reader of Bayesian Essentials with R getting stuck on that exercise!!!

STEM forums

Posted in Books, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on August 15, 2014 by xi'an

“I can calculate the movement of stars, but not the madness of men.” Isaac Newton

When visiting the exhibition hall at JSM 2014, I spoke with people from STEM forums on the Springer booth. The concept of STEM (why STEM? Nothing to do with STAN! Nor directly with Biology. It stands as the accronym for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.) is to create a sort of peer-reviewed Cross Validated where questions would be filtered (in order to avoid the most basic questions like “How can I learn about Bayesian statistics without opening a book?” or “What is the Binomial distribution?” that often clutter the Stack Exchange boards). That’s an interesting approach which I will monitor in the future, as on the one hand, it would be nice to have a Statistics forum without “lazy undergraduate” questions as one of my interlocutors put, and on the other hand, to see how STEM forums can compete with the well-established Cross Validated and its core of dedicated moderators and editors. I left the booth with a neat tee-shirt exhibiting the above quote as well as alpha-tester on the back: STEM forums is indeed calling for entries into the Statistics section, with rewards of ebooks for the first 250 entries and a sweepstakes offering a free trip to Seattle next year!