the decline of the French [maths] empire

Posted in Kids, University life with tags , , , , , , , on December 16, 2017 by xi'an

In Le Monde edition of Nov 5, an article on the difficulty of maths departments to attract students, especially in master programs and in the training of secondary school maths teachers (Agrégation & CAPES), where the number of candidates usually does not reach the number of potential positions… And also on the deep changes in the training of secondary school pupils, who over the past five years have lost a considerable amount of maths bases and hence are found missing when entering the university level. (Or, put otherwise, have a lower level in maths that implies a strong modification of our own programs and possibly the addition of an extra year or at least semester to the bachelor degree…) For instance, a few weeks ago, I realised for instance that my third year class had little idea of a conditional density and teaching measure theory at this level becomes more and more of a challenge!

A big problem in our community

Posted in Statistics with tags , , on December 15, 2017 by xi'an

Like Pierre, after reading Kristian’s courageous wake-up call, I was thinking of waiting a few days before blogging on the fundamental problem this harrowing story of hers exposes, while moving to actively make ISBA safe, along with Kerrie Mengersen and other members, especially j-ISBA. So in the meanwhile, here is Pierre’s blog entry that I completely endorse, with an additional feeling of failed responsibility as a senior man and president of ISBA:

Statisfaction

5edacba28521a18b3b6ad0d53a7622b7 “Tout va très bien”, meaning “all is well”, by Franquin.

Hi all,

Kristian Lum, who was already one of my Statistics superheroes for hermanyinterestingpapers and great talks, bravely wrote the following text about her experience as a young statistician going to conferences:

https://medium.com/@kristianlum/statistics-we-have-a-problem-304638dc5de5

I can’t thank Kristian enough for speaking out. Her experience is both shocking and hardly surprising. Many, many academics report similar stories. This simply can’t go on like that.

I happen to have gone to the conferences mentioned by Kristian, and my experience as a young man was completely different. It was all about meeting interesting people, discussing ideas, being challenged, and having good times. Nobody harassed, touched or assaulted me. There was some flirting, as I guess is natural when hundreds of people are put in sunny places far away from home, but I was never the victim of any misconduct or…

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improperties on an astronomical scale

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on December 15, 2017 by xi'an

As pointed out by Peter Coles on his blog, In the Dark, Hyungsuk Tak, Sujit Ghosh, and Justin Ellis just arXived a review of the unsafe use of improper priors in astronomy papers, 24 out of 75 having failed to establish that the corresponding posteriors are well-defined. And they exhibit such an instance (of impropriety) in a MNRAS paper by Pihajoki (2017), which is a complexification of Gelfand et al. (1990), also used by Jim Hobert in his thesis. (Even though the formal argument used to show the impropriety of the posterior in Pihajoki’s paper does not sound right since it considers divergence at a single value of a parameter β.) Besides repeating this warning about an issue that was rather quickly identified in the infancy of MCMC, if not in the very first publications on the Gibbs sampler, the paper seems to argue against using improper priors due to this potential danger, stating that instead proper priors that include all likely values and beyond are to be preferred. Which reminds me of the BUGS feature of using a N(0,10⁹) prior instead of the flat prior, missing the fact that “very large” variances do impact the resulting inference (if only for the issue of model comparison, remember Lindley-Jeffreys!). And are informative in that sense. However, it is obviously a good idea to advise checking for propriety (!) and using such alternatives may come as a safety button, providing a comparison benchmark to spot possible divergences in the resulting inference.

U of T sunset [jatp]

Posted in pictures, Running, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , on December 14, 2017 by xi'an

Au’Bayes 17

Posted in Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 14, 2017 by xi'an

Some notes scribbled during the O’Bayes 17 conference in Austin, not reflecting on the highly diverse range of talks. And many new faces and topics, meaning O’Bayes is alive and evolving. With all possible objectivity, a fantastic conference! (Not even mentioning the bars where Peter Müller hosted the poster sessions, a feat I would have loved to see duplicated for the posters of ISBA 2018… Or the Ethiopian restaurant just around the corner with the right amount of fierce spices!)

The wiki on objective, reference, vague, neutral [or whichever label one favours] priors that was suggested at the previous O’Bayes meeting in Valencià, was introduced as Wikiprevia by Gonzalo Garcia-Donato. It aims at classifying recommended priors in most of the classical models, along with discussion panels, and it should soon get an official launch, when contributors will be welcome to include articles in a wiki principle. I wish the best to this venture which, I hope, will induce O’Bayesians to contribute actively.

In a brilliant talk that quickly reverted my jetlag doziness, Peter Grünwald returned to the topic he presented last year in Sardinia, namely safe Bayes or powered-down likelihoods to handle some degree of misspecification, with a further twist of introducing an impossible value `o’ that captures missing mass (to be called Peter’s demon?!), which absolute necessity I did not perceive. Food for thoughts, definitely. (But I feel that the only safe Bayes is the dead Bayes, as protecting against all kinds of mispecifications means no action is possible.)

I also appreciated Cristiano Villa’s approach to constructing prior weights in model comparison from a principled and decision-theoretic perspective even though I felt that the notion of ranking parameter importance required too much input to be practically feasible. (Unless I missed that point.)

Laura Ventura gave her talk on using for ABC various scores or estimating equations as summary statistics, rather than the corresponding M-estimators, which offers the appealing feature of reducing computation while being asymptotically equivalent. (A feature we also exploited for the regular score function in our ABC paper with Gael, David, Brendan, and Wonapree.) She mentioned the Hyvärinen score [of which I first heard in Padova!] as a way to bypass issues related to doubly intractable likelihoods. Which is a most interesting proposal that bypasses (ABC) simulations from such complex targets by exploiting a pseudo-posterior.

Veronika Rockova presented a recent work on concentration rates for regression tree methods that produce a rigorous analysis of these methods. Showing that the spike & slab priors plus BART [equals spike & tree] achieve sparsity and optimal concentration. In an oracle sense. With a side entry on assembling partition trees towards creating a new form of BART. Which made me wonder whether or not this was also applicable to random forests. Although they are not exactly Bayes. Demanding work in terms of the theory behind but with impressive consequences!

Just before I left O’Bayes 17 for Houston airport, Nick Polson, along with Peter McCullach, proposed an intriguing notion of sparse Bayes factors, which corresponds to the limit of a Bayes factor when the prior probability υ of the null goes to zero. When the limiting prior is replaced with an exceedance measure that can be normalised into a distribution, but does it make the limit a special prior? Linking  υ with the prior under the null is not an issue (this was the basis of my 1992 Lindley paradox paper) but the sequence of priors indexed by υ need be chosen. And reading from the paper at Houston airport, I could not spot a construction principle that would lead to a reference prior of sorts. One thing that Nick mentioned during his talk was that we observed directly realisations of the data marginal, but this is generally not the case as the observations are associated with a given value of the parameter, not one for each observation.The next edition of the O’Bayes conference will be in… Warwick on June 29-July 2, as I volunteered to organise this edition (16 years after O’Bayes 03 in Aussois!) just after the BNP meeting in Oxford on June 23-28, hopefully creating the environment for fruitful interactions between both communities! (And jumping from Au’Bayes to Wa’Bayes.)

Bayesian synthetic likelihood

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on December 13, 2017 by xi'an

Leah Price, Chris Drovandi, Anthony Lee and David Nott published earlier this year a paper in JCGS on Bayesian synthetic likelihood, using Simon Wood’s synthetic likelihood as a substitute to the exact likelihood within a Bayesian approach. While not investigating the theoretical properties of this approximate approach, the paper compares it with ABC on some examples. In particular with respect to the number n of Monte Carlo replications used to approximate the mean and variance of the Gaussian synthetic likelihood.

Since this approach is most naturally associated with an MCMC implementation, it requires new simulations of the summary statistics at each iteration, without a clear possibility to involve parallel runs, in contrast to ABC. However in the final example of the paper, the authors reach values of n of several thousands, making use of multiple cores relevant, if requiring synchronicity and checks at every MCMC iteration.

The authors mention that “ABC can be viewed as a pseudo-marginal method”, but this has a limited appeal since the pseudo-marginal is a Monte Carlo substitute for the ABC target, not the original target. Similarly, there exists an unbiased estimator of the Gaussian density due to Ghurye and Olkin (1969) that allows to perceive the estimated synthetic likelihood version as a pseudo-marginal, once again wrt a target that differs from the original one. And the bias reappears under mis-specification, that is when the summary statistics are not normally distributed. It seems difficult to assess this normality or absence thereof in realistic situations.

“However, when the distribution of the summary statistic is highly irregular, the output of BSL cannot be trusted, while ABC represents a robust alternative in such cases.”

To make synthetic likelihood and ABC algorithms compatible, the authors chose a Normal kernel for ABC. Still, the equivalence is imperfect in that the covariance matrix need be chosen in the ABC case and is estimated in the synthetic one. I am also lost to the argument that the synthetic version is more efficient than ABC, in general (page 8). As for the examples, the first one uses a toy Poisson posterior with a single sufficient summary statistic, which is not very representative of complex situations where summary statistics are extremes or discrete. As acknowledged by the authors this is a case when the Normality assumption applies. For an integer support hidden process like the Ricker model, normality vanishes and the outcomes of ANC and synthetic likelihood differ, which makes it difficult to compare the inferential properties of both versions (rather than the acceptance rates), while using a 13-dimension statistic for estimating a 3-dimension parameter is not recommended for ABC, as discussed by Li and Fearnhead (2017). The same issue appears in the realistic cell motility example, with 145 summaries versus two parameters. (In the philogenies studied by DIYABC, the number of summary statistics is about the same but we now advocate a projection to the parameter dimension by the medium of random forests.)

Given the similarity between both approaches, I wonder at a confluence between them, where synthetic likelihood could maybe be used to devise PCA on the summary statistics and facilitate their projection on a space with much smaller dimensions. Or estimating the mean and variance functions in the synthetic likelihood towards producing directly simulations of the summary statistics.

red Capitol [jatp]

Posted in pictures, Running, Travel with tags , , , , , on December 12, 2017 by xi'an