Archive for academic journals

Journal of Open Source Software

Posted in Books, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on October 4, 2016 by xi'an

A week ago, I received a request for refereeing a paper for the Journal of Open Source Software, which I have never seen (or heard of) before. The concept is quite interesting with a scope much broader than statistical computing (as I do not know anyone in the board and no-one there seems affiliated with a Statistics department). Papers are very terse, describing the associated code in one page or two, and the purpose of refereeing is to check the code. (I was asked to evaluate an MCMC R package but declined for lack of time.) Which is a pretty light task if the code is friendly enough to operate right away and provide demos. Best of luck to this endeavour!

Statistics & Computing [toc]

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , on June 29, 2016 by xi'an

6The latest [June] issue of Statistics & Computing is full of interesting Bayesian and Monte Carlo entries, some of which are even open access!

 

the end of Series B!

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , on May 25, 2016 by xi'an

I received this news from the RSS today that all the RSS journals are turning 100% electronic. No paper version any longer! I deeply regret this move on which, as an RSS member, I would have appreciated to be consulted as I find much easier to browse through the current issue when it arrives in my mailbox, rather than being t best reminded by an email that I will most likely ignore and erase. And as I consider the production of the journals the prime goal of the Royal Statistical Society. And as I read that only 25% of the members had opted so far for the electronic format, which does not sound to me like a majority. In addition, moving to electronic-only journals does not bring the perks one would expect from electronic journals:

  • no bonuses like supplementary material, code, open or edited comments
  • no reduction in the subscription rate of the journals and penalty fees if one still wants a paper version, which amounts to a massive increase in the subscription price
  • no disengagement from the commercial publisher, whose role become even less relevant
  • no access to the issues of the years one has paid for, once one stops subscribing.

“The benefits of electronic publishing include: faster publishing speeds; increased content; instant access from a range of electronic devices; additional functionality; and of course, environmental sustainability.”

The move is sold with typical marketing noise. But I do not buy it: publishing speeds will remain the same as driven by the reviewing part, I do not see where the contents are increased, and I cannot seriously read a journal article from my phone, so this range of electronic devices remains a gadget. Not happy!

new reproducibility initiative in TOMACS

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 12, 2016 by xi'an

[A quite significant announcement last October from TOMACS that I had missed:]

To improve the reproducibility of modeling and simulation research, TOMACS  is pursuing two strategies.

Number one: authors are encouraged to include sufficient information about the core steps of the scientific process leading to the presented research results and to make as many of these steps as transparent as possible, e.g., data, model, experiment settings, incl. methods and configurations, and/or software. Associate editors and reviewers will be asked to assess the paper also with respect to this information. Thus, although not required, submitted manuscripts which provide clear information on how to generate reproducible results, whenever possible, will be considered favorably in the decision process by reviewers and the editors.

Number two: we will form a new replicating computational results activity in modeling and simulation as part of the peer reviewing process (adopting the procedure RCR of ACM TOMS). Authors who are interested in taking part in the RCR activity should announce this in the cover letter. The associate editor and editor in chief will assign a RCR reviewer for this submission. This reviewer will contact the authors and will work together with the authors to replicate the research results presented. Accepted papers that successfully undergo this procedure will be advertised at the TOMACS web page and will be marked with an ACM reproducibility brand. The RCR activity will take place in parallel to the usual reviewing process. The reviewer will write a short report which will be published alongside the original publication. TOMACS also plans to publish short reports about lessons learned from non-successful RCR activities.

[And now the first paper reviewed according to this protocol has been accepted:]

The paper Automatic Moment-Closure Approximation of Spatially Distributed Collective Adaptive Systems is the first paper that took part in the new replicating computational results (RCR) activity of TOMACS. The paper completed successfully the additional reviewing as documented in its RCR report. This reviewing is aimed at ensuring that computational results presented in the paper are replicable. Digital artifacts like software, mechanized proofs, data sets, test suites, or models, are evaluated referring to ease of use, consistency, completeness, and being well documented.

do cartoons help?

Posted in Books, Kids, Running, University life with tags , , , , , , on November 8, 2015 by xi'an

I received a (mass) email from Taylor & Francis about creating a few cartoons related to recent papers… As in the example above about the foot strike of Kilian Jornet. With a typo on Font-Romeu. Apart from the authors themselves, and maybe some close relatives!, I have trouble seeing the point of this offer, as cartoons are unlikely to attract academic readers interested in the contents of the paper.

beyond subjective and objective in Statistics

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 28, 2015 by xi'an

“At the level of discourse, we would like to move beyond a subjective vs. objective shouting match.” (p.30)

This paper by Andrew Gelman and Christian Hennig calls for the abandonment of the terms objective and subjective in (not solely Bayesian) statistics. And argue that there is more than mere prior information and data to the construction of a statistical analysis. The paper is articulated as the authors’ proposal, followed by four application examples, then a survey of the philosophy of science perspectives on objectivity and subjectivity in statistics and other sciences, next to a study of the subjective and objective aspects of the mainstream statistical streams, concluding with a discussion on the implementation of the proposed move. Continue reading

Objective Bayesian hypothesis testing

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , on June 19, 2015 by xi'an

Our paper with Diego Salmerón and Juan Cano using integral priors for binomial regression and objective Bayesian hypothesis testing (one of my topics of interest, see yesterday’s talk!) eventually appeared in Statistica Sinica. This is Volume 25,  Number 3, of July 2015 and the table of contents shows an impressively diverse range of topics.