Archive for academic journals

new reproducibility initiative in TOMACS

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 12, 2016 by xi'an

[A quite significant announcement last October from TOMACS that I had missed:]

To improve the reproducibility of modeling and simulation research, TOMACS  is pursuing two strategies.

Number one: authors are encouraged to include sufficient information about the core steps of the scientific process leading to the presented research results and to make as many of these steps as transparent as possible, e.g., data, model, experiment settings, incl. methods and configurations, and/or software. Associate editors and reviewers will be asked to assess the paper also with respect to this information. Thus, although not required, submitted manuscripts which provide clear information on how to generate reproducible results, whenever possible, will be considered favorably in the decision process by reviewers and the editors.

Number two: we will form a new replicating computational results activity in modeling and simulation as part of the peer reviewing process (adopting the procedure RCR of ACM TOMS). Authors who are interested in taking part in the RCR activity should announce this in the cover letter. The associate editor and editor in chief will assign a RCR reviewer for this submission. This reviewer will contact the authors and will work together with the authors to replicate the research results presented. Accepted papers that successfully undergo this procedure will be advertised at the TOMACS web page and will be marked with an ACM reproducibility brand. The RCR activity will take place in parallel to the usual reviewing process. The reviewer will write a short report which will be published alongside the original publication. TOMACS also plans to publish short reports about lessons learned from non-successful RCR activities.

[And now the first paper reviewed according to this protocol has been accepted:]

The paper Automatic Moment-Closure Approximation of Spatially Distributed Collective Adaptive Systems is the first paper that took part in the new replicating computational results (RCR) activity of TOMACS. The paper completed successfully the additional reviewing as documented in its RCR report. This reviewing is aimed at ensuring that computational results presented in the paper are replicable. Digital artifacts like software, mechanized proofs, data sets, test suites, or models, are evaluated referring to ease of use, consistency, completeness, and being well documented.

do cartoons help?

Posted in Books, Kids, Running, University life with tags , , , , , , on November 8, 2015 by xi'an

I received a (mass) email from Taylor & Francis about creating a few cartoons related to recent papers… As in the example above about the foot strike of Kilian Jornet. With a typo on Font-Romeu. Apart from the authors themselves, and maybe some close relatives!, I have trouble seeing the point of this offer, as cartoons are unlikely to attract academic readers interested in the contents of the paper.

beyond subjective and objective in Statistics

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 28, 2015 by xi'an

“At the level of discourse, we would like to move beyond a subjective vs. objective shouting match.” (p.30)

This paper by Andrew Gelman and Christian Hennig calls for the abandonment of the terms objective and subjective in (not solely Bayesian) statistics. And argue that there is more than mere prior information and data to the construction of a statistical analysis. The paper is articulated as the authors’ proposal, followed by four application examples, then a survey of the philosophy of science perspectives on objectivity and subjectivity in statistics and other sciences, next to a study of the subjective and objective aspects of the mainstream statistical streams, concluding with a discussion on the implementation of the proposed move. Continue reading

Objective Bayesian hypothesis testing

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , on June 19, 2015 by xi'an

Our paper with Diego Salmerón and Juan Cano using integral priors for binomial regression and objective Bayesian hypothesis testing (one of my topics of interest, see yesterday’s talk!) eventually appeared in Statistica Sinica. This is Volume 25,  Number 3, of July 2015 and the table of contents shows an impressively diverse range of topics.

Series B news

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 24, 2014 by xi'an

IMG_2451IMG_2450The Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B, has a new cover, a new colour and a new co-editor. As can be seen from the above shots, the colour is now a greenish ochre, with a picture of pedestrians on a brick plaza as a background, not much related to statistical methodology as far as I can tell. More importantly, the new co-editor for the coming four years is Piotr Fryzlewicz, professor at the London School of Economics, who will share the burden with Ingrid van Keilegom professor from UCL (Louvain-la-Neuve) who is now starting her third year… My friend, colleague and successor as Series B editor Gareth Roberts is now retiring after four years of hard work towards making Series B one of the top journals in Statistics. Thanks Gareth and best wishes to Ingrid and Piotr!

Oriental Journal of Computer Science and Technology (duh?!)

Posted in Books, University life with tags , on April 18, 2013 by xi'an

Another email linked to the meta-spamming of pseudo-academic publications:

I feel pleasure to introduce our publications entitled “Oriental Journal 
of Computer Science and Technology” which is being published since last 
6th years, under the banner of “Oriental Scientific Publishing Company”, 
Bhopal, India. T
        For maintaining the high standard of the journal, we always remain
in search of researchers of repute of their respective fields, and with the
same purpose I am inviting you to grace the Editorial Cum Advisory Board of
our journal. You are supposed to review three-four articles per year and as 
per your will and convenience.
        We are eager to receive your acceptance and valuable suggestions for the
improvement of the journal. I am pleased to announce that our reputed Editorial
Cum Advisory Board member will enjoy concession rebate on the publication 
charges of their manuscripts.

It is amazing that they did not even check I am not in computer sciences! (Just considering the Editorial Board…)

Journal of Statistical Distributions and Applications

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , on April 18, 2013 by xi'an

I just got an email about a

*Springer* on a new *peer-reviewed, open access journal*

whose sole aim seems to generate more revenue for Springer. Indeed, papers published in this journal are charged $1025 each. Which is about the cost for a single subscription to the overpriced if scientifically excellent Statistics and Computing. (It takes a serious effort to discover the subscription rate of a Springer journal on their website!)

Indeed, I am quite surprised at a journal focussing on statistical distributions. What is a statistical distribution, exactly? The era when one would discover a new probability distribution in connection with a statistical estimation or testing problem and call it t, F, or Beta, seems long long gone! Just as gone as the production of statistical tables.  (This is also why I wrote such a negative review of The Handbook of Fitting Distributions.) The webpage of the journal indicates that

The scopes include, but are not limited to, development and study of statistical distributions, frequentist and Bayesian statistical inference including goodness-of-fit tests, statistical modeling, computational/simulation methods, and data analysis related to statistical distributions. Significant and well-written articles on theory and methods in areas of statistical distributions and their applications will be considered for publication.

but this sounds so broad as to cover almost any statistical paper. So I am wondering at the purpose of this journal, except as an experimentation in “open access” commercial journals that are fully supported by the authors, in essence making grants pay twice for research.

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