Archive for academic journals

and here we go!

Posted in Books, Running, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on March 16, 2018 by xi'an

On March 1, I have started handling papers for Biometrika as deputy editor, along with Omiros Papaspiliopoulos. With on average one paper a day to handle this means a change in my schedule and presumably less blog posts about recent papers and arXivals if I want to keep my daily morning runs!

Biometrika

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on November 29, 2017 by xi'an

After ten years of outstanding dedication to Biometrika, Anthony Davison is retiring as Editor of Biometrika on 31 December. Ten years! Running a top journal like Biometrika is a massive service to the statistics community, especially when considering the painstaking stage of literally editing each paper towards the stylistic requirements of the journal. For which we definitely should all be quite grateful to Anthony. And to the new Editor, Paul Fearnhead, for taking over. I will actually join the editorial board as assistant editor, along with Omiros Papaspiliopoulos, meaning we will share together the task of screening and allocating submissions. A bit daunting given the volume of submissions is roughly similar to the one I was handling for Series B ten years ago. And given the PCI Comput Stat experiment starting soon!

stop the rot!

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 26, 2017 by xi'an

Several entries in Nature this week about predatory journals. Both from Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. One emanates from the publication officer at the Institute, whose role is “dedicated to educating researchers and guiding them in their journal submission”. And telling the tale of a senior scientist finding out a paper submitted to a predatory journal and later rescinded was nonetheless published by the said journal. Which reminded me of a similar misadventure that occurred to me a few years ago. After having a discussion of an earlier paper therein rejected from The American Statistician, my PhD student Kaniav Kamary and I resubmitted it to the Journal of Applied & Computational Mathematics, from which I had received an email a few weeks earlier asking me in flowery terms for a paper. When the paper got accepted as such two days after submission, I got alarmed and realised this was a predatory journal, which title played with the quasi homonymous Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics (Elsevier) and International Journal of Applied and Computational Mathematics (Springer). Just like the authors in the above story, we wrote back to the editors, telling them we were rescinding our submission, but never got back any reply or request of copyright transfer. Instead, requests for (diminishing) payments were regularly sent to us, for almost a year, until they ceased. In the meanwhile, the paper had been posted on the “journal” website and no further email of ours, including some from our University legal officer, induced a reply or action from the journal…

The second article in Nature is from a group of epidemiologists at the same institute, producing statistics about biomedical publications in predatory journals (characterised as such by the defunct Beall blacklist). And being much more vehement about the danger represented by these journals, which “articles we examined were atrocious in terms of reporting”, and authors submitting to them, as unethical for wasting human and animal observations. The authors of this article identify thirteen characteristics for spotting predatory journals, the first one being “low article-processing fees”, our own misadventure being the opposite. And they ask for higher control and auditing from the funding institutions over their researchers… Besides adding an extra-layer to the bureaucracy, I fear this is rather naïve, as if the boundary between predatory and non-predatory journals was crystal clear, rather than a murky continuum. And putting the blame solely on the researchers rather than sharing it with institutions always eager to push their bibliometrics towards more automation of the assessment of their researchers.

crowd-based peer review

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 20, 2017 by xi'an

In clear connection with my earlier post on Peer Community In… and my visit this week to Montpellier towards starting a Peer Community In Computational Statistics, I read a tribune in Nature (1 June, p.9) by the editor of Synlett, Benjamin List, describing an experiment conducted by this journal in chemical synthesis. The approach was to post (volunteered) submitted papers on a platform accessible to a list of 100 reviewers, nominated by the editorial board, who could anonymously comment on the papers and read others’ equally anonymous comments. With a 72 hours deadline! According to Benjamin List (and based on  a large dataset of … 10 papers!), the outcome of the experiment is one of better quality return than with traditional reviewing policies. While Peer Community In… does not work exactly this way, and does not aim at operating as a journal, it is exciting and encouraging to see such experiments unfold!

Journal of Open Source Software

Posted in Books, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on October 4, 2016 by xi'an

A week ago, I received a request for refereeing a paper for the Journal of Open Source Software, which I have never seen (or heard of) before. The concept is quite interesting with a scope much broader than statistical computing (as I do not know anyone in the board and no-one there seems affiliated with a Statistics department). Papers are very terse, describing the associated code in one page or two, and the purpose of refereeing is to check the code. (I was asked to evaluate an MCMC R package but declined for lack of time.) Which is a pretty light task if the code is friendly enough to operate right away and provide demos. Best of luck to this endeavour!

Statistics & Computing [toc]

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , on June 29, 2016 by xi'an

6The latest [June] issue of Statistics & Computing is full of interesting Bayesian and Monte Carlo entries, some of which are even open access!

 

the end of Series B!

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , on May 25, 2016 by xi'an

I received this news from the RSS today that all the RSS journals are turning 100% electronic. No paper version any longer! I deeply regret this move on which, as an RSS member, I would have appreciated to be consulted as I find much easier to browse through the current issue when it arrives in my mailbox, rather than being t best reminded by an email that I will most likely ignore and erase. And as I consider the production of the journals the prime goal of the Royal Statistical Society. And as I read that only 25% of the members had opted so far for the electronic format, which does not sound to me like a majority. In addition, moving to electronic-only journals does not bring the perks one would expect from electronic journals:

  • no bonuses like supplementary material, code, open or edited comments
  • no reduction in the subscription rate of the journals and penalty fees if one still wants a paper version, which amounts to a massive increase in the subscription price
  • no disengagement from the commercial publisher, whose role become even less relevant
  • no access to the issues of the years one has paid for, once one stops subscribing.

“The benefits of electronic publishing include: faster publishing speeds; increased content; instant access from a range of electronic devices; additional functionality; and of course, environmental sustainability.”

The move is sold with typical marketing noise. But I do not buy it: publishing speeds will remain the same as driven by the reviewing part, I do not see where the contents are increased, and I cannot seriously read a journal article from my phone, so this range of electronic devices remains a gadget. Not happy!