Archive for Royal Statistical Society

racism, discrimination and statistics – examining the history [at the RSS]

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on October 23, 2020 by xi'an

The Royal Statistical Society is holding an on-line round table on “Racism, discrimination and statistics – examining the history” on 30 October, at 4pm UK time. The chair is RSS President Deborah Ashby and the speakers are

  • John Aldrich – chair of the RSS History Section
  • Angela Saini – science journalist
  • Stephen Senn – Fisher Memorial Trust

right place, wrong version

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 12, 2020 by xi'an

scalable Langevin exact algorithm [armchair Read Paper]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 26, 2020 by xi'an

So, Murray Pollock, Paul Fearnhead, Adam M. Johansen and Gareth O. Roberts presented their Read Paper with discussions on the Wednesday aft! With a well-sized if virtual audience of nearly a hundred people. Here are a few notes scribbled during the Readings. And attempts at keeping the traditional structure of the meeting alive.

In their introduction, they gave the intuition of a quasi-stationary chain as the probability to be in A at time t while still alice as π(A) x exp(-λt) for a fixed killing rate λ. The concept is quite fascinating if less straightforward than stationarity! The presentation put the stress on the available recourse to an unbiased estimator of the κ rate whose initialisation scaled as O(n) but allowed a subsampling cost reduction afterwards. With a subsampling rat connected with Bayesian asymptotics, namely on how quickly the posterior concentrates. Unfortunately, this makes the practical construction harder, since n is finite and the concentration rate is unknown (although a default guess should be √n). I wondered if the link with self-avoiding random walks was more than historical.

The initialisation of the method remains a challenge in complex environments. And hence one may wonder if and how better it does when compared with SMC. Furthermore, while the motivation for using a Brownian motion stems from the practical side, this simulation does not account for the target π. This completely blind excursion sounds worse than simulating from the prior in other settings.

One early illustration for quasi stationarity was based on an hypothetical distribution of lions and wandering (Brownian) antelopes. I found that the associated concept of soft killing was not necessarily well received by …. the antelopes!

As it happens, my friend and coauthor Natesh Pillai was the first discussant! I did no not get the details of his first bimodal example. But he addressed my earlier question about how large the running time T should be. Since the computational cost should be exploding with T. He also drew a analogy with improper posteriors as to wonder about the availability of convergence assessment.

And my friend and coauthor Nicolas Chopin was the second discussant! Starting with a request to… leave the Pima Indians (model)  alone!! But also getting into a deeper assessment of the alternative use of SMCs.

RSS honours recipients for 2020

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 16, 2020 by xi'an

Just read the news that my friend [and co-author] Arnaud Doucet (Oxford) is the winner of the 2020 Guy Silver Medal award from the Royal Statistical Society. I was also please to learn about David Spiegelhalter‘s Guy Gold medal (I first met David at the fourth Valencia Bayesian meeting in 1991, where he had a poster on the very early stages of BUGS) and Byron Morgan‘s Barnett Award for his indeed remarkable work on statistical ecology and in particular Bayesian capture recapture models. Congrats to all six recipients!

unbiased MCMC discussed at the RSS tomorrow night

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2019 by xi'an

The paper ‘Unbiased Markov chain Monte Carlo methods with couplings’ by Pierre Jacob et al. will be discussed (or Read) tomorrow at the Royal Statistical Society, 12 Errol Street, London, tomorrow night, Wed 11 December, at 5pm London time. With a pre-discussion session at 3pm, involving Chris Sherlock and Pierre Jacob, and chaired by Ioanna Manolopoulou. While I will alas miss this opportunity, due to my trip to Vancouver over the weekend, it is great that that the young tradition of pre-discussion sessions has been rekindled as it helps put the paper into perspective for a wider audience and thus makes the more formal Read Paper session more profitable. As we discussed the paper in Paris Dauphine with our graduate students a few weeks ago, we will for certain send one or several written discussions to Series B!