Archive for University of Warwick

a new rule for adaptive importance sampling

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 5, 2019 by xi'an

Art Owen and Yi Zhou have arXived a short paper on the combination of importance sampling estimators. Which connects somehow with the talk about multiple estimators I gave at ESM last year in Helsinki. And our earlier AMIS combination. The paper however makes two important assumptions to reach optimal weighting, which is inversely proportional to the variance:

  1. the estimators are uncorrelated if dependent;
  2. the variance of the k-th estimator is of order a (negative) power of k.

The later is puzzling when considering a series of estimators, in that k appears to act as a sample size (as in AMIS), the power is usually unknown but also there is no reason for the power to be the same for all estimators. The authors propose to use ½ as the default, both because this is the standard Monte Carlo rate and because the loss in variance is then minimal, being 12% larger.

As an aside, Art Owen also wrote an invited discussion “the unreasonable effectiveness of Monte Carlo” of ” Probabilistic Integration: A Role in Statistical Computation?” by François-Xavier Briol, Chris  Oates, Mark Girolami (Warwick), Michael Osborne and Deni Sejdinovic, to appear in Statistical Science, discussion that contains a wealth of smart and enlightening remarks. Like the analogy between pseudo-random number generators [which work unreasonably well!] vs true random numbers and Bayesian numerical integration versus non-random functions. Or the role of advanced bootstrapping when assessing the variability of Monte Carlo estimates (citing a paper of his from 1992). Also pointing out at an intriguing MCMC paper by  Michael Lavine and Jim Hodges to appear in The American Statistician.

distributed posteriors

Posted in Books, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on February 27, 2019 by xi'an

Another presentation by our OxWaSP students introduced me to the notion of distributed posteriors, following a 2018 paper by Botond Szabó and Harry van Zanten. Which corresponds to the construction of posteriors when conducting a divide & conquer strategy. The authors show that an adaptation of the prior to the division of the sample is necessary to recover the (minimax) convergence rate obtained in the non-distributed case. This is somewhat annoying, except that the adaptation amounts to take the original prior to the power 1/m, when m is the number of divisions. They further show that when the regularity (parameter) of the model is unknown, the optimal rate cannot be recovered unless stronger assumptions are made on the non-zero parameters of the model.

“First of all, we show that depending on the communication budget, it might be advantageous to group local machines and let different groups work on different aspects of the high-dimensional object of interest. Secondly, we show that it is possible to have adaptation in communication restricted distributed settings, i.e. to have data-driven tuning that automatically achieves the correct bias-variance trade-off.”

I find the paper of considerable interest for scalable MCMC methods, even though the setting may happen to sound too formal, because the study incorporates parallel computing constraints. (Although I did not investigate the more theoretical aspects of the paper.)

Tile Hill [paintings]

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 24, 2019 by xi'an

particular degeneracy in ABC model choice

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , on February 22, 2019 by xi'an

In one of the presentations by the last cohort of OxWaSP students, the group decided to implement an ABC model choice strategy based on sequential ABC inspired from Toni et al.  (2008). and this made me reconsider this approach (disclaimer: no criticism of the students implied in the following!). Indeed, the outcome of the simulation led to the ultimate selection of a single model, exclusive of all other models, corresponding to a posterior probability of one in favour of this model. Which sounds like a drawback of the ABC-SMC model choice approach in this setting, namely that it is quite prone to degeneracy, much more than standard SMC, since once a model vanishes from the list, it can never reappear in the following iterations if I am reading the algorithm correctly. To avoid this degeneracy, one would need to keep a population of particles of a given size, for each model, towards using it as a pool for moves at following iterations… Which also means that running in parallel as many ABC-SMC filters as there are models would be equally or more efficient, a wee bit like parallel MCMC chains may prove more efficient than reversible jump for model comparison. (On the trivial side, the OxWaSP seminar on the same day was briefly interrupted by water leakage caused by Storm Eric and poor workmanship on the new building!)

Bayesian intelligence in Warwick

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2019 by xi'an

This is an announcement for an exciting CRiSM Day in Warwick on 20 March 2019: with speakers

10:00-11:00 Xiao-Li Meng (Harvard): “Artificial Bayesian Monte Carlo Integration: A Practical Resolution to the Bayesian (Normalizing Constant) Paradox”

11:00-12:00 Julien Stoehr (Dauphine): “Gibbs sampling and ABC”

14:00-15:00 Arthur Ulysse Jacot-Guillarmod (École Polytechnique Fedérale de Lausanne): “Neural Tangent Kernel: Convergence and Generalization of Deep Neural Networks”

15:00-16:00 Antonietta Mira (Università della Svizzera italiana e Università degli studi dell’Insubria): “Bayesian identifications of the data intrinsic dimensions”

[whose abstracts are on the workshop webpage] and free attendance. The title for the workshop mentions Bayesian Intelligence: this obviously includes human intelligence and not just AI!

O’Bayes 19: registration and travel support

Posted in pictures, Running, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on February 14, 2019 by xi'an

An update about the O’Bayes 19 conference next June-July:  the early registration period has now opened. And there should be funds for supporting early-career researchers, thanks to Google and CNRS sponsorships, as detailed below:

Early-career researchers less than four years from PhD, are invited to apply for early-career scholarships. If you are a graduate student, postdoctoral researcher or early-career academic and you are giving a poster, you are eligible to apply. Female researchers and underrepresented minorities are especially encouraged to apply. Selected applicants will receive up to £450, which can be used for any combination of fees, travel and accommodation costs, subject to receipts.

The deadline for applying is the 15th of March (which is also the deadline to submit the abstract for the poster) and it has to be done at the registration phase via the dedicated page. Those who have submitted an abstract before this information on scholarships was made available (11 Feb.) and applying for travel support should contact the organisers.

revisiting marginalisation paradoxes [Bayesian reads #1]

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 8, 2019 by xi'an

As a reading suggestion for my (last) OxWaSP Bayesian course at Oxford, I included the classic 1973 Marginalisation paradoxes by Phil Dawid, Mervyn Stone [whom I met when visiting UCL in 1992 since he was sharing an office with my friend Costas Goutis], and Jim Zidek. Paper that also appears in my (recent) slides as an exercise. And has been discussed many times on this  ‘Og.

Reading the paper in the train to Oxford was quite pleasant, with a few discoveries like an interesting pike at Fraser’s structural (crypto-fiducial?!) distributions that “do not need Bayesian improper priors to fall into the same paradoxes”. And a most fascinating if surprising inclusion of the Box-Müller random generator in an argument, something of a precursor to perfect sampling (?). And a clear declaration that (right-Haar) invariant priors are at the source of the resolution of the paradox. With a much less clear notion of “un-Bayesian priors” as those leading to a paradox. Especially when the authors exhibit a red herring where the paradox cannot disappear, no matter what the prior is. Rich discussion (with none of the current 400 word length constraint), including the suggestion of neutral points, namely those that do identify a posterior, whatever that means. Funny conclusion, as well:

“In Stone and Dawid’s Biometrika paper, B1 promised never to use improper priors again. That resolution was short-lived and let us hope that these two blinkered Bayesians will find a way out of their present confusion and make another comeback.” D.J. Bartholomew (LSE)

and another

“An eminent Oxford statistician with decidedly mathematical inclinations once remarked to me that he was in favour of Bayesian theory because it made statisticians learn about Haar measure.” A.D. McLaren (Glasgow)

and yet another

“The fundamentals of statistical inference lie beneath a sea of mathematics and scientific opinion that is polluted with red herrings, not all spawned by Bayesians of course.” G.N. Wilkinson (Rothamsted Station)

Lindley’s discussion is more serious if not unkind. Dennis Lindley essentially follows the lead of the authors to conclude that “improper priors must go”. To the point of retracting what was written in his book! Although concluding about the consequences for standard statistics, since they allow for admissible procedures that are associated with improper priors. If the later must go, the former must go as well!!! (A bit of sophistry involved in this argument…) Efron’s point is more constructive in this regard since he recalls the dangers of using proper priors with huge variance. And the little hope one can hold about having a prior that is uninformative in every dimension. (A point much more blatantly expressed by Dickey mocking “magic unique prior distributions”.) And Dempster points out even more clearly that the fundamental difficulty with these paradoxes is that the prior marginal does not exist. Don Fraser may be the most brutal discussant of all, stating that the paradoxes are not new and that “the conclusions are erroneous or unfounded”. Also complaining about Lindley’s review of his book [suggesting prior integration could save the day] in Biometrika, where he was not allowed a rejoinder. It reflects on the then intense opposition between Bayesians and fiducialist Fisherians. (Funny enough, given the place of these marginalisation paradoxes in his book, I was mistakenly convinced that Jaynes was one of the discussants of this historical paper. He is mentioned in the reply by the authors.)