Archive for Switzerland

Stick to Science [week of action]

Posted in University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2022 by xi'an

Stick to Science initiative [petition

Posted in University life with tags , , , , , , , , on March 13, 2022 by xi'an
Stick to Science

The Stick to Science initiative has been set up by the European research community calling for open and barrier-free collaboration among Europe’s research and innovation (R&I) actors, who all share the same values. The initiative is an active response to the delayed  progression of association agreements with Switzerland and the United Kingdom (UK), which are being held up by political barriers that have nothing to do with science.

The signatories request that the European Council, Parliament, Commission, as well as European Union (EU) Member States, and the governments of the UK and Switzerland, recognise that advancement in R&I is best achieved when all actors in science and innovation work together across geographic boundaries. This has never been more important than now, as the world faces serious global challenges (e.g., mitigating pandemics, climate change, and addressing food security). Allowing political differences to prevent scientific collaboration is contrary to the interests of society at large.

The signatories urge the EU, the UK and Switzerland to rapidly reach association agreements so that the two countries can contribute scientifically and financially to the strength of Horizon Europe and to a truly open, inclusive and excellence-driven European Research Area.

 

postdoc on COVID-19 modelling in Lugano

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , on July 24, 2021 by xi'an

A new call for postdoctoral applications from my friend Anto: a postdoctoral position is opening this Fall at the Università della Svizzera italiana (USI) in Lugano, Switzerland, under her direction, for conducting interdisciplinary approach to modelling the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic and responses to it on other outcomes, such as mortality.

PRIMA grants in Lugano

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , , on June 8, 2021 by xi'an

Forwarding a call from my friend Antonietta Mira for young female scientists to join her at USI, Lugano, Svizzera, for projects in Data Science, funded by a PRIMA PhD grant. Deadline is 1 September 2021.

Prima grants are aimed at young female researchers who wish to conduct, manage and lead an independent project at a Swiss higher education institution. It awards five-years grants to female researchers who fulfill the following criteria:

  • They match the SNSF requirements for Prima concerning academic age (mobility is not needed):  At least 2 years of research experience after the doctorate; Maximum 10 years from the doctorate.

  • They have an excellent academic track record, especially in terms of publications, and firm ambitions to pursue an academic career.

  • They demonstrate interest in scientific domains represented at USI.

a journal of the plague year [lost September reviews]

Posted in Books, Kids, Mountains, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 12, 2020 by xi'an

Read a (red) book I bought in Chamonix last January (sounds like last century, at the very least!) at the Éditions Guérin bookshop, The Bond, by Simon McCartney, translated in French as The Ghosts from Denali. It starts more or less like a traditional mountain climbing story, with a pair of cocky young climbers attacking a new and difficult route and managing the opening despite severe adverse circumstances, which is what Simon McCartney and Jack Roberts did for the north face of Mount Huntington in Alaska, having run out of food and facing the constant threat of collapsing seracs. It however turns into a inner introspection as McCartney gets stranded on the mythical Eiger Nordwand (just like many before him!) after his large group keeps breaking their Charlet Moser icepicks due to the cold (!) and end up being airlifted. He later manages a Winter climb of the Eiger and reunites with Roberts to attempt the south face of Denali, never climbed before. This is when the book takes off, from the sheer difficulty of the route to the amazing unpreparation of the climbers, to Simon’s cerebral embolism building up and bringing him a hair away from death, to the altruism of several other climbers on the mountain to bring him down from the death zone, especially Bo Kandiko, and to a trauma-induced complete break from climbing when McCartney got out of Anchorage hospital. This is gripping and moving and unbelievable. The book received a Banff Mountain Festival award and no wonder. The story told by McCartney is actually seamlessly completed by diary excerpts by Roberts and Kandiko, where they question their own involvement against the very real danger of dying from staying with McCartney, much more than giving up their own attempt against the deadly mountain. A terrific mountaineering book, truly. As a sad coda, Roberts died ice-climbing Bridal Veil Falls a few days before McCartney’s attempt to reunite with him.

Spent several evenings baking fig jam when returning from the Alps as the fig tree was full! And ended up with a total of 35 jars. Resulting into a full “marmalade closet”, as in the past weeks my mom home-made the same amount of peach jelly and my wife’s mom even more rhubarb marmalade jars. Enough to stand a whole year of lockdown, jam-wise. And ate some of the few but tasty peppers that grew in our garden, for the very first time, despite the welcomed tomato and squash invasion! Also ate a terribly greasy risotto in a supposedly highly noted restaurant…

Started watching Dark on Netflix, a German dark time-travel fiction. But while I enjoyed the complex story, the play of the young actors, and the appeal of watching a show (and a Greek play within the show, with Ariádnê and Thêseús of course!) in German, the endless paradoxes of time-travel and the duration of the series made me stop after a few episodes, the town of Winden keeping most of its mystery for me.

%d bloggers like this: