Archive for Coventry

LMS Invited Lecture Series / CRISM Summer School 2018

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on July 12, 2018 by xi'an

four positions at Warwick Statistics, apply!

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , on March 26, 2018 by xi'an

Enthusiastic and excellent academics are sought to be part of our Department of Statistics at Warwick, one of the world’s most prominent and most research active departments of Statistics! We are advertising four posts in total, which reflects the strong commitment of the University of Warwick to invest in Statistics. We intend to fill the following positions:

  • Assistant or Associate Professor of Statistics (two positions)

  • Harrison Early Career Assistant Professor of Statistics (two positions)

You will have expertise in statistics (to be interpreted in the widest sense and to include both applied and methodological statistics, probability, probabilistic operational research and mathematical finance together with interdisciplinary topics involving one or more of these areas) and you will help shape research and teaching leadership in this fast-developing discipline. Applicants for senior positions should have an excellent publication record and proven ability to secure research funding. Applicants for more junior positions should show exceptional promise to become leading academics.

While the posts are open to applicants with expertise in any field of statistics (widely interpreted as above), the Department is particularly interested in strengthening its existing group in Data Science. The Department is heavily involved in the Warwick Data Science Institute and the Alan Turing Institute, the national institute for data science, headquartered in London. If interested, a successful candidate can apply to spend part of their time at the Alan Turing Institute as a Turing Fellow.

Closing date: 10 April 2018 for the posts.

Informal enquires can be addressed to Professors Mark Steel, Gareth Roberts, and David Firth or to any other senior member of the Warwick Statistics Department. Applicants at Assistant/Associate levels should ask their referees to send letters of recommendation by the closing date to the Departmental Administrator, Mrs Paula Matthews.

In addition to any specific positions announced above, the Department of Statistics strongly encourages applicants for funded, open research fellowship competitions to consider holding their fellowship in statistics or probability at Warwick.

BAYSM’18 [British summer conference series]

Posted in Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , on January 22, 2018 by xi'an

four positions at Warwick Statistics, apply!

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on November 21, 2017 by xi'an

Enthusiastic and excellent academics are sought to be part of our Department of Statistics at Warwick, one of the world’s most prominent and most research active departments of Statistics. We are advertising four posts in total, which reflects the strong commitment of the University of Warwick to invest in Statistics. We intend to fill the following positions:

  • Assistant or Associate Professor of Statistics (two positions)

  • Reader of Statistics

  • Full Professor of Statistics.

All posts are permanent, with posts at the Assistant level subject to probation.

You will have expertise in statistics (to be interpreted in the widest sense and to include both applied and methodological statistics, probability, probabilistic operational research and mathematical finance together with interdisciplinary topics involving one or more of these areas) and you will help shape research and teaching leadership in this fast-developing discipline. Applicants for senior positions should have an excellent publication record and proven ability to secure research funding. Applicants for more junior positions should show exceptional promise to become leading academics.

While the posts are open to applicants with expertise in any field of statistics (widely interpreted as above), the Department is particularly interested in strengthening its existing group in Data Science. The Department is heavily involved in the Warwick Data Science Institute and the Alan Turing Institute, the national institute for data science, headquartered in London. If interested, a successful candidate can apply to spend part of their time at the Alan Turing Institute as a Turing Fellow.

Closing date: 3 January 2018 for the Assistant/Associate level posts and 10 January 2018 for the Full Professor position.

Informal enquires can be addressed to Professors Mark Steel, Gareth Roberts, and David Firth or to any other senior member of the Warwick Statistics Department. Applicants at Assistant/Associate levels should ask their referees to send letters of recommendation by the closing date to the Departmental Administrator, Mrs Paula Matthews.

the girl with the spider’s nest [book review]

Posted in Books with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 12, 2016 by xi'an

“..the Millennium Trilogy was messier and more eccentric than much popular fiction, a genre that can lean towards standardisation. Lagercrantz’s continuation, while never formulaic, is a cleaner and tighter read than the originals…” The Guardian

“…while Mr. Lagercrantz never makes the N.S.A.’s involvement in the case Salander and Blomkvist are investigating remotely convincing, he writes with such assurance and velocity in the later portions of the book that he powers through these more dubious passages.” The New York Times

Millennium is a bit like chocolate addiction, when I carefully pack away the remains of a Lindt tablet, only to get back to it for another row half-an-hour later… The style of the series is rudimentary, the story is just implausible, the message is shaky, as explained in my earlier reviews, and still, still, I just got back from binge reading a new volume, even though it was written by another author. David Lagercrantz. Who also managed to write a biography of both Alan Turing and a (former Paris) footballer competing with Chuck Norris…

I had misgivings, to start with, about another author taking over the commercial massive success of the previous author (towards a further commercial massive success, apparently, to judge from the 7,575 customer reviews there!). With much less legitimacy (if any) than, say, Brandon Sanderson taking over Robert Jordan to complete the Wheel of Time. (Although this sequel is completely legit, since Stieg Larsson’s family controls his literary estate and hired David Lagercrantz.)  On the other hand, I do not have the highest respect for the literary qualities of the series, beyond inducing a remarkable crave for the next page that kept me awake part of both nights when I read The Girl with the Spider’s web. A feature that, in my opinion, relates to the essentially commercial nature of the product (and that is compounded by the mere £3.00 it cost me in a Coventry supermarket!).

Without getting into spoilers, the current story revolves around the complicated family tree of Lisbeth Salander, the endless fight of the Millennium editors against market forces, the murky waters of hacking and of intelligence companies, plus some lines about NSA’s Egotistical Giraffe, quantum computing, public-key encryption, and resolution by elliptic curve factorization. Story that remains as enjoyable as the previous volumes, even though it may be lacking in the psychology of the characters.  Given the extreme implausibility of the intelligence central plot, I am rather surprised at the very positive reviews found in the press, as shown by both quotes reproduced above…

One of the threads exploited in the book is the threat represented by super-intelligence, that is when AIs become much more intelligent than humans. This should ring a bell as this is the theme of Super-Intelligence, the book by Nick Bostrom I reviewed a few months ago. Although this volume of Millenium only broaches upon the topic, and while there is no reason to imagine a direct connection between both books, even though Lagercrantz may have read the popular book of a fellow Swede, I find the setting both amazing and so representative of the way the book ingratiates itself into the main computer culture memes.

sent to Coventry!

Posted in Books, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , on May 7, 2016 by xi'an

Coventry city hall, Feb. 2016The other day, my wife came across the expression sent to Coventry and asked me what the reason was for this expression, which Wikitionary explains as

Verb

send to Coventry ‎(third-person singular simple present sends to Coventry, present participle sending to Coventry, simple past and past participle sent to Coventry)

  1. (transitive, idiomatic) To ostracise, or systematically ignore someone.
    The group decided to send the unpopular members to Coventry.

I had never heard this expression before, certainly not while in Coventry, so checked on Wikipedia to see whether or not it was related to the rather unappealing down-town postwar reconstruction. As it appears, the most likely connection is much more ancient as it relates to royalist troops being sent to Coventry, a parliamentarian town during the English Civil War,

contemporary issues in hypothesis testing

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 3, 2016 by xi'an

hipocontemptNext Fall, on 15-16 September, I will take part in a CRiSM workshop on hypothesis testing. In our department in Warwick. The registration is now open [until Sept 2] with a moderate registration free of £40 and a call for posters. Jim Berger and Joris Mulder will both deliver a plenary talk there, while Andrew Gelman will alas give a remote talk from New York. (A terrific poster by the way!)