Archive for computational statistics

the definitive summer school poster

Posted in pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 8, 2018 by xi'an

A of A

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 30, 2017 by xi'an

Next June, at the same time as the ISBA meeting in Edinburgh, which is slowly taking shape, there will be an Analysis of Algorithms (AofA) meeting in Uppsala (Sweden) with Luc Devroye as the plenary Flajolet Award speaker. The full name of the conference is the 29th International Conference on Probabilistic, Combinatorial and Asymptotic Methods for the Analysis of Algorithms. While it is unfortunate the two conferences take place at the same time (and not in the same location), this also provides a continuity of conferences with the following week MCqMC in Rennes and the subsequent week summer school in simulation in Warwick (with Art Owen as the LMS Lecturer).

About our summer school, I want to point out that, thanks to several sponsors, we will be able to provide a consequent number of bursaries for junior researchers. This should be an additional incentive for attendees of the previous week Young Bayesian meeting (BAYSM) to remain the extra days nearby Warwick and attend this fantastic opportunity. Other instructors are Nicolas Chopin, Mark Huber and Jeff Rosenthal!

journée algorithmes stochastiques à Dauphine vendredi

Posted in Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on November 28, 2017 by xi'an

A final reminder (?) that we hold a special day of five talks around stochastic algorithms at Dauphine this Friday, from 10:00 till 17:30. Attendance is free, coffee and tea are free (while they last!), come and join us!

postdocs positions in Uppsala in computational stats for machine learning

Posted in Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 22, 2017 by xi'an

Lawrence Murray sent me a call for two postdoc positions in computational statistics and machine learning. In Uppsala, Sweden. With deadline November 17. Definitely attractive for a fresh PhD! Here are some of the contemplated themes:

(1) Developing efficient Bayesian inference algorithms for large-scale latent variable models in data rich scenarios.

(2) Finding ways of systematically combining different inference techniques, such as variational inference, sequential Monte Carlo, and deep inference networks, resulting in new methodology that can reap the benefits of these different approaches.

(3) Developing efficient black-box inference algorithms specifically targeted at inference in probabilistic programs. This line of research may include implementation of the new methods in the probabilistic programming language Birch, currently under development at the department.

G²S³18, Breckenridge, CO, June 17-30, 2018

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 3, 2017 by xi'an

new kid on the blog

Posted in Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , on January 27, 2016 by xi'an

[I first thought this title was highly original but a google search showed me wrong…] This short post to point out to the new blog started by Ingmar Schuster on computational statistics and linguistics. Which, so far, keeps strictly to the discussion of recent research papers (rather than ratiocinating about all kinds of tangential topics like a certain ‘Og…) Some of which we may discuss in parallel. And some not. So keep posted! Ingmar came to Paris-Dauphine for a doctoral visit last Winter and is back as a postdoc (supported by the Fondation des Sciences Mathématiques de Paris) since last Fall. Working with me and Nicolas, among others.

 

done! [#2]

Posted in Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 21, 2016 by xi'an

exosPhew! I just finished my enormous pile of homeworks for the computational statistics course… This massive pile is due to an unexpected number of students registering for the Data Science Master at ENSAE and Paris-Dauphine. As I was not aware of this surge, I kept to my practice of asking students to hand back solved exercises from Monte Carlo Statistical Methods at the beginning of each class. And could not change the rules of the game once the course had started! Next year, I’ll make sure to get some backup for grading those exercises. Or go for group projects instead…