Archive for Great North Road

guess what..?! Yet another worskhop in the endless summer Bayesian series!

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 18, 2018 by xi'an

Dennis Prangle pointed to me the perfectly timed i-like workshop taking place in Newcastle, on the days priors to ABC in Edinburgh and ISBA (similarly in Edinburgh!). (Note that Warwick is also part of the i-like network. Actually, the first i-like workshop was my first trip abroad after the Accident!) I may sound negative about these workshops, but on the opposite am quite a fan of them, just regretting that the main event did not take advantage of them all to reduce the volume of talks there. As I suggested, it could have been feasible to label these satellites as part of the main conference towards making speakers at these officially speakers at ISBA 2018 in case talks were required for support…

The i-like workshop 2018 is the sixth edition of a yearly series of workshops dedicated to the topic of intractable likelihoods, hosted by Newcastle University. The workshop will take place from Wednesday 20 June 2018 – Friday 22 June 2018 in Room 2.98, Armstrong Building, Newcastle upon Tyne. Registration is free and mandatory!

I spent a few days in Newcastle at the RSS meeting of 2013, with my friends Jim Hobert and Elias Moreno. Enjoying very much the city, its surroundings, the great meadow north of the city in a glorious sunset (I still bemoan not catching on camera!). And it is just in the vicinity of Hadrian’s Wall, just on the other side of the Borders, very close to Edinburgh in fact.

Great North Road [book review]

Posted in Books, Running, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 6, 2017 by xi'an

As I was unsure of the Internet connections and of the more than likely delays I would face during my trip to India, I went fishing for a massive novel on Amazon and eventually ordered Peter Hamilton’s Great North Road, a 1088 pages behemoth! I fear the book qualifies as space opera, with the conventional load of planet invasions, incomprehensible and infinitely wise aliens, gateways for instantaneous space travels, and sentient biospheres. But the core of the story is very, very, Earth-bound, with a detective story taking place in a future Newcastle that is not so distant from now in many ways. (Or even from the past as the 2012 book did not forecast Brexit…) With an occurrence of the town moor where I went running a few years ago.

The book is mostly well-designed, with a plot gripping enough to keep me hooked for Indian evenings in Kolkata and most of the flight back. I actually finished it just before landing in Paris. There is no true depth in the story, though, and the science fiction part is rather lame: a very long part of the detective plot is spent on the hunt for a taxi by an army of detectives, a task one would think should be delegated to a machine-learning algorithm and solved in a nano-second or so. The themes heavily borrow from those of classics like Avatar, Speaker for the Dead, Hyperion [very much Hyperion!], Alien… And from The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo for an hardcore heroin who is perfect at anything she undertakes.  Furthermore, the Earth at the centre of this extended universe is very close to its present version, with English style taxis, pub culture, and a geopolitic structure of the World pretty much unchanged. Plus main brands identical to currents ones (Apple, BMW, &tc), to the point it sounds like sponsored links! And no clue of a major climate change despite the continued use of fuel engines. Nonetheless, an easy read when stuck in an airport or a plane seat for several hours.