Archive for PSL

20 postdoc positions in Paris!

Posted in Kids, pictures, University life with tags , , , , , , on November 22, 2017 by xi'an

The Fondation Sciences Mathématiques de Paris (FSMP) provides funding for 20 years of post-doctoral fellowships in mathematics and in computer science for the 2018-2019 academic year. (Meaning you cannot expect a position in Paris for the coming 20 years!) Appointed fellows will hold one or two-year positions in affiliated research laboratories, starting in October 2018. This program is supported by Université Paris Sciences Lettres (PSL). If you are interested in applying for one of these fellowships, please register online. Note that the deadline is December 1!

Journée algorithmes stochastiques

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 27, 2017 by xi'an

On December 1, 2017, we will hold a day workshop on stochastic algorithms at Université Paris-Dauphine, with the following speakers

 Details and abstracts of the talks are available on the workshop webpage. Attendance is free, but registration is requested towards planning the morning and afternoon coffee breaks. Looking forward seeing ‘Og’s readers there, at least those in the vicinity!

And while I am targetting Parisians, crypto-Bayesians, and nearly-Parisians, there is another day workshop on Bayesian and PAC-Bayesian methods on November 16, at Université Pierre et Marie Curie (campus Jussieu), with invited speakers

and a similar request for (free) registration.

the French MIT? not so fast…

Posted in Kids, pictures, University life with tags , , , , , , , on February 20, 2017 by xi'an

Gare de Sceaux, May 25, 2012A news report last weekend on Nature webpage about the new science super-campus south of Paris connected with my impressions of the whole endeavour: the annual report from the Court of Auditors estimated that the 5 billion euros invested in this construct were not exactly a clever use of public [French taxpayer] money! This notion to bring a large number of [State] engineer and scientific schools from downtown Paris to the plateau of Saclay, about 25km south-west of Paris, around École Polytechnique, had some appeal, since these were and are prestigious institutions, most with highly selective entry exams, and with similar training programs, now that they have almost completely lost the specialisation that justified their parallel existences! And since a genuine university, Paris 11 Orsay, stood nearby at the bottom of the plateau. Plus, a host of startups and research branches of companies. Hence the concept of a French MIT.

However, as so often the case in Jacobin France, the move has been decided and supported by the State “top-down” rather than by the original institutions themselves. Including a big push by Nicolas Sarkozy in 2010. While the campus can be reached by public transportation like RER, the appeal of living and working on the campus is obviously less appealing to both students and staff than in a listed building in the centre of Paris. Especially when lodging and living infrastructures are yet to be completed. But the main issue is that the fragmentation of those schools, labs and institutes, in terms of leadership, recruiting, research, and leadership, has not been solved by the move, each entity remaining strongly attached to its identity, degree, networks, &tc., and definitely unwilling to merge into a super-university with a more efficient organisation of teaching and research. Which means the overall structure as such is close to invisible at the international level. This is the point raised by the State auditors. And perceived by the State which threatens to cut funding at this late stage!

This is not the only example within French higher educations institutions since most have been forced to merged into incomprehensible super-units under the same financial threat. Like Paris-Dauphine being now part of the PSL (Paris Sciences et Lettres) heterogeneous conglomerate. (I suspect one of the primary reasons for this push by central authorities was to create larger entities towards moving up in the international university rankings, which is absurd for many reasons, from the limited worth of such rankings, to the lag between the creation of a new entity and the appearance on an international university ranking, to the difficulty in ranking researchers from such institutions: in Paris-Dauphine, the address to put on papers is more than a line long, with half a dozen acronyms!)

nuit de la philosophie

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, University life with tags , , , , on November 15, 2016 by xi'an

nuitphilo

postdoc position in “data-driven social sciences” at Paris-Dauphine

Posted in Kids, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , on July 5, 2016 by xi'an

posdof

methods for quantifying conflict casualties in Syria

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on November 3, 2014 by xi'an

On Monday November 17, 11am, Amphi 10, Université Paris-Dauphine,  Rebecca Steorts from CMU will give a talk at the GT Statistique et imagerie seminar:

Information about social entities is often spread across multiple large databases, each degraded by noise, and without unique identifiers shared across databases.Entity resolution—reconstructing the actual entities and their attributes—is essential to using big data and is challenging not only for inference but also for computation.

In this talk, I motivate entity resolution by the current conflict in Syria. It has been tremendously well documented, however, we still do not know how many people have been killed from conflict-related violence. We describe a novel approach towards estimating death counts in Syria and challenges that are unique to this database. We first introduce computational speed-ups to avoid all-to-all record comparisons based upon locality-sensitive hashing from the computer science literature. We then introduce a novel approach to entity resolution by discovering a bipartite graph, which links manifest records to a common set of latent entities. Our model quantifies the uncertainty in the inference and propagates this uncertainty into subsequent analyses. Finally, we speak to the success and challenges of solving a problem that is at the forefront of national headlines and news.

This is joint work with Rob Hall (Etsy), Steve Fienberg (CMU), and Anshu Shrivastava (Cornell University).

[Note that Rebecca will visit the maths department in Paris-Dauphine for two weeks and give a short course in our data science Master on data confidentiality, privacy and statistical disclosure (syllabus).]