Archive for software

following versions [xkcd reposted]

Posted in Books, Kids, University life with tags , , on November 18, 2019 by xi'an

we have never been unable to develop a reliable predictive model

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 10, 2019 by xi'an

An alarming entry in The Guardian about the huge proportion of councils in the UK using machine-learning software to allocate benefits, detect child abuse or claim fraud. And relying blindly on the outcome of such software, despite their well-documented lack of reliability, uncertainty assessments, and warnings. Blindly in the sense that the impact of their (implemented) decision was not even reviewed, even though a portion of the councils does not consider renewing the contracts. With the appalling statement of the CEO of one software company reported in the title. Blaming further the lack of accessibility [for their company] of the data used by the councils for the impossibility [for the company] of providing risk factors and identifying bias, in an unbelievable newspeak inversion… As pointed out by David Spiegelhalter in the article, the openness should go the other way, namely that the algorithms behind the suggestions (read decisions) should be available to understand why these decisions were made. (A whole series of Guardian articles relate to this as well, under the heading “Automating poverty”.)

BayesComp 20: call for contributed sessions!

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 20, 2019 by xi'an

Just to remind readers of the incoming deadline for BayesComp sessions:

The deadline for providing a title and brief abstract that the session is April 1, 2019. Please provide the names and affiliations of the organizer and the three speakers (the organizer can be one of them). Each session lasts 90 minutes and each talk should be 30 minutes long including Q&A. Contributed sessions can also consist of tutorials on the use of novel software. Decisions will be made by April 15, 2019. Please send your proposals to Christian Robert, co-chair of the scientific committee. We look forward to seeing you at BayesComp 20!

In case you do not feel like organising a whole session by yourself, contact the ISBA section you feel affinity with and suggest it helps building this session together!

call for sessions and labs at Bay2sC0mp²⁰

Posted in pictures, R, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 22, 2019 by xi'an

A call to all potential participants to the incoming BayesComp 2020 conference at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, 7-10 January 2020, to submit proposals [to me] for contributed sessions on everything computational or training labs [to David Rossell] on a specific language or software. The deadline is April 1 and the sessions will be selected by the scientific committee, other proposals being offered the possibility to present the associated research during a poster session [which always is a lively component of the conference]. (Conversely, we reserve the possibility of a “last call” session made from particularly exciting posters on new topics.) Plenary speakers for this conference are

and the first invited sessions are already posted on the webpage of the conference. We dearly hope to attract a wide area of research interests into a as diverse as possible program, so please accept this invitation!!!

Elves to the ABC rescue!

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics with tags , , , , , , on November 7, 2018 by xi'an

Marko Järvenpää, Michael Gutmann, Arijus Pleska, Aki Vehtari, and Pekka Marttinen have written a paper on Efficient Acquisition Rules for Model-Based Approximate Bayesian Computation soon to appear in Bayesian Analysis that gives me the right nudge to mention the ELFI software they have been contributing to for a while. Where the acronym stands for engine for likelihood-free inference. Written in Python, DAG based, and covering methods like the

  • ABC rejection sampler
  • Sequential Monte Carlo ABC sampler
  • Bayesian Optimization for Likelihood-Free Inference (BOLFI) framework
  • Bayesian Optimization (not likelihood-free)
  • No-U-Turn-Sampler (not likelihood-free)

[Warning: I did not experiment with the software! Feel free to share.]

“…little work has focused on trying to quantify the amount of uncertainty in the estimator of the ABC posterior density under the chosen modelling assumptions. This uncertainty is due to a finite computational budget to perform the inference and could be thus also called as computational uncertainty.”

The paper is about looking at the “real” ABC distribution, that is, the one resulting from a realistic perspective of a finite number of simulations and acceptances. By acquisition, the authors mean an efficient way to propose the next value of the parameter θ, towards minimising the uncertainty in the ABC density estimate. Note that this involves a loss function that must be chosen by the analyst and then available for the minimisation program. If this sounds complicated…

“…our interest is to design the evaluations to minimise the uncertainty in a quantity that itself describes the uncertainty of the parameters of a costly simulation model.”

it indeed is and it requires modelling choices. As in Guttman and Corander (2016), which was also concerned by designing the location of the learning parameters, the modelling is based here on a Gaussian process for the discrepancy between the observed and the simulated data. Which provides an estimate of the likelihood, later used for selecting the next sampling value of θ. The final ABC sample is however produced by a GP estimation of the ABC distribution.As noted by the authors, the method may prove quite time consuming: for instance, one involved model required one minute of computation time for selecting the next evaluation location. (I had a bit of a difficulty when reading the paper as I kept hitting notions that are local to the paper but not immediately or precisely defined. As “adequation function” [p.11] or “discrepancy”. Maybe correlated with short nights while staying at CIRM for the Masterclass, always waking up around 4am for unknown reasons!)