Archive for Spain

València summer school

Posted in Kids, pictures, R, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , on January 31, 2018 by xi'an

In another continuation of the summer of Bayesian conferences in Europe, the Universidat de Valencià is organising a summer school on Bayesian statistics, from 16 July till 20 July, 2018. Which thus comes right after our summer school on computational statistics at Warwick. With a basic course on Bayesian learning (2 days). And a more advanced course on Bayesian modeling with BayesX. And a final day workshop.

El asiedo [book review]

Posted in Books, pictures, Travel, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 13, 2018 by xi'an

Just finished this long book by Arturo Pérez-Reverte that I bought [in its French translation] after reading the fascinating Dos de Mayo about the rebellion of the people of Madrid against the Napoleonian occupants. This book, The Siege, is just fantastic, more literary than Dos de Mayo and a mix of different genres, from the military to the historical, to the criminal, to the chess, to the speculative, to the romantic novel..! There are a few major characters, a police investigator, a trading company head, a corsair, a French canon engineer, a guerilla, with a well-defined unique location, the city of Cádiz under [land] siege by the French troops, but with access to the sea thanks to the British Navy. The serial killer part is certainly not the best item in the plot [as often with serial killer stories!], as it slowly drifts to the supernatural, borrowing from Laplace and Condorcet to lead to perfect predictions of where and when French bombs will fall. The historical part also appears to be rather biased against the British forces, if this opinion page is to be believed, towards a nationalist narrative making the Spanish guerilla resistance bigger and stronger than it actually was. But I still read the story with fascination and it kept me awake past my usual bedtime for several nights as I could not let the story go!

Réquiem por un campesino español [book review]

Posted in Books, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , on December 17, 2017 by xi'an

Thanks To Victor Elvira, I read this fantastic novel by Ramón Sender, a requiem for a Spanish peasant, Pablo, which tells the story of a bright and progressive Spanish peasant from Aragon, who got shot by the fascists during the Spanish Civil War. The story is short and brilliant, told from the eyes of the parish priest who denounced Pablo to the Franco falanges who eventually executed it. The style is brilliant as well, since the priest keeps returning to his long-term connection with Pablo, from his years as an altar boy, discovering poverty and injustice when visiting dying parishioners with the priest, to launching rural reform actions against the local landowners. And uselessly if understandably trying to justify his responsibility in the death of the young man, celebrating a mass in his memory where no one from the village attends, except for the landowners themselves. A truly moving celebration of the Spanish Civil War and of the massive support of the catholic church for Franco.

how to make ISBA conference safe for all?

Posted in University life with tags , , , , , on December 16, 2017 by xi'an

As Kristian Lum’s courageous posting of her harrowing experience at ISBA 2010 and of her resulting decision to leave academia, if not thankfully research (as demonstrated by her recent work on the biases in policing software), is hitting the Bayesian community and beyond as a salutary tsunami, I am seeking concrete actions to change ISBA meetings towards preventing to the largest extent sexual harassment and helping victims formally as well as informally, as Dan Simpson put it on his blog post. Having discussed the matter intensely with colleagues and friends over the past days, and joined a Task Force set immediately on Dec 14 by Kerrie Mengersen in her quality of President of ISBA, there are many avenues in the medium and long terms to approach such goals. But I feel the most urgent action is to introduce contact referents (for lack of a better name outside the military or the religious…) who at each conference could be reached at all times in case of need or of reporting inappropriate conduct of any kind. This may prove difficult to build, not because of a lack of volunteers but because of the difficulty in achieving a representativity of all attendees towards them trusting at least one member well enough to reach and confide. One section of ISBA, j-ISBA, can and definitely does help in this regard, including its involvement in the Task Force, but we need to reach further. As put by Kerrie in her statement, your input is valued.

 

Bayes Comp 2018

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 28, 2017 by xi'an

After a rather extended wait, I learned today of the dates of the next MCMski conference, now called Bayes Comp, in Barcelona, Spain, March 26-29, next year (2018). With a cool webpage! (While the ski termination has been removed from the conference name, there are ski resorts located not too far from Barcelona, in the Pyrenees.) Just unfortunate that it happens at the same dates as the ENAR 2018 meeting. (And with the Gregynog Statistical Conference!)

Paris-Dauphine photograph competition [jatp]

Posted in pictures, University life with tags , , , , , , on March 22, 2017 by xi'an

Dos de Mayo [book review]

Posted in Books with tags , , , , , , , , on August 23, 2016 by xi'an

Following a discusion I had with Victor Elvirà about Spanish books, I ordered a book by Arturo Pérez-Reverte called a Day of Wrath (un día de cólera), but apparently not translated into English. The day of wrath is the second of May, 1808, when the city of Madrid went to arms against the French occupation by Napoléon’s troops. An uprising that got crushed by Murat’s repression the very same day, but which led to the entire Spain taking arms against the occupation. The book is written out of historical accounts of the many participants to the uprising, from both Madrilene and French sides. Because of so many viewpoints being reported, some for a single paragraph before the victims die, the literary style is not particularly pleasant, but this is nonetheless a gripping book that I read within a single day while going (or trying to get) to San Francisco. And it is historically revealing of how unprepared the French troops were about an uprising by people mostly armed with navajas and a few hunting rifles. Who still managed to hold parts of the town for most of a day, with the help of a single artillery battalion while the rest of the troops stayed in their barracks. The author actually insists very much on that aspect, that the rebellion was mostly due to the action of the people, while leading classes, the Army, and the clergy almost uniformly condemned it. Upped estimations on the number of deaths on that day (and the following days) range around 500 for Madrilenes and 150 for French tropps, but the many stories running in the book give the impression of many more casualties.