Archive for Jeffreys-Lindley paradox

at CIRM [#2]

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 2, 2016 by xi'an

Sylvia Richardson gave a great talk yesterday on clustering applied to variable selection, which first raised [in me] a usual worry of the lack of background model for clustering. But the way she used this notion meant there was an infinite Dirichlet process mixture model behind. This is quite novel [at least for me!] in that it addresses the covariates and not the observations themselves. I still wonder at the meaning of the cluster as, if I understood properly, the dependent variable is not involved in the clustering. Check her R package PReMiuM for a practical implementation of the approach. Later, Adeline Samson showed us the results of using pMCM versus particle Gibbs for diffusion processes where (a) pMCMC was behaving much worse than particle Gibbs and (b) EM required very few particles and Metropolis-Hastings steps to achieve convergence, when compared with posterior approximations.

Today Pierre Druilhet explained to the audience of the summer school his measure theoretic approach [I discussed a while ago] to the limit of proper priors via q-vague convergence, with the paradoxical phenomenon that a Be(n⁻¹,n⁻¹) converges to a sum of two Dirac masses when the parameter space is [0,1] but to Haldane’s prior when the space is (0,1)! He also explained why the Jeffreys-Lindley paradox vanishes when considering different measures [with an illustration that came from my Statistica Sinica 1993 paper]. Pierre concluded with the above opposition between two Bayesian paradigms, a [sort of] tale of two sigma [fields]! Not that I necessarily agree with the first paradigm that priors are supposed to have generated the actual parameter. If only because it mechanistically excludes all improper priors…

Darren Wilkinson talked about yeast, which is orders of magnitude more exciting than it sounds, because this is Bayesian big data analysis in action! With significant (and hence impressive) results based on stochastic dynamic models. And massive variable selection techniques. Scala, Haskell, Frege, OCaml were [functional] languages he mentioned that I had never heard of before! And Daniel Rudolf concluded the [intense] second day of this Bayesian week at CIRM with a description of his convergence results for (rather controlled) noisy MCMC algorithms.

normality test with 10⁸ observations?

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , on February 23, 2016 by xi'an

Quentin Gronau and Eric-Jan Wagenmakers just arXived a rather exotic paper in that it merges experimental mathematics with Bayesian inference. The mathematical question at stake here is whether or not one of the classical irrational constants like π, e or √2 are “normal”, that is, have the same frequency for all digits in their decimal expansion. This (still) is an open problem in mathematics. Indeed, the authors do not provide a definitive answer but instead run a Bayesian testing experiment on 100 million digits on π, ending up with a Bayes factor of 2×10³¹. The figure is massive, however one must account for the number of “observations” in the sample. (Which is not a statistical sample, strictly speaking.) While I do not think the argument will convince an algebraist (as the counterargument of knowing nothing about digits after the 10⁸th one is easy to formulate!), I am also uncertain of the relevance of this huge figure, as I am unable to justify a prior on the distribution of digits if the number is not normal. Since we do not even know whether there are non-normal numbers outside rational numbers. While the flat Dirichlet prior is a uniform prior over the simplex, to assume that all possible probability repartitions are equally possible may not appeal to a mathematician, as far as I [do not] know! Furthermore, the multinomial model imposed on (at?) the series of digit of π does not have to agree with this “data” and discrepancies may as well be due to a poor sampling model as to an inappropriate prior. The data may more agree with H⁰ than with H¹ because the sampling model in H¹ is ill-suited. The paper also considers a second prior (or posterior prior) that I do not find particularly relevant.

For all I [do not] know, the huge value of the Bayes factor may be another avatar of the Lindley-Jeffreys paradox. In the sense of my interpretation of the phenomenon as a dilution of the prior mass over an unrealistically large space. Actually, the authors mention the paradox as well (p.5) but seemingly as a criticism of a frequentist approach. The picture above has its lower bound determined by a virtual dataset that produces a χ² statistic equal to the 95% χ² quantile. Dataset that stills produces a fairly high Bayes factor. (The discussion seems to assume that the Bayes factor is a one-to-one function of the χ² statistics, which is not correct I think. I wonder if exactly 95% of the sequence of Bayes factors stays within this band. There is no theoretical reason for this to happen of course.) Hence an illustration of the Lindley-Jeffreys paradox indeed, in its first interpretation of the clash between conclusions based on both paradigms. As a conclusion, I am thus not terribly convinced that this experiment supports the use of a Bayes factor for solving this normality hypothesis. Not that I support the alternative use of the p-value of course! As a sidenote, the pdf file I downloaded from arXiv has a slight bug that interacted badly with my printer in Warwick, as shown in the picture above.

Measuring statistical evidence using relative belief [book review]

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 22, 2015 by xi'an

“It is necessary to be vigilant to ensure that attempts to be mathematically general do not lead us to introduce absurdities into discussions of inference.” (p.8)

This new book by Michael Evans (Toronto) summarises his views on statistical evidence (expanded in a large number of papers), which are a quite unique mix of Bayesian  principles and less-Bayesian methodologies. I am quite glad I could receive a version of the book before it was published by CRC Press, thanks to Rob Carver (and Keith O’Rourke for warning me about it). [Warning: this is a rather long review and post, so readers may chose to opt out now!]

“The Bayes factor does not behave appropriately as a measure of belief, but it does behave appropriately as a measure of evidence.” (p.87)

Continue reading

the maths of Jeffreys-Lindley paradox

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on March 26, 2015 by xi'an

75b18-imagedusparadrapCristiano Villa and Stephen Walker arXived on last Friday a paper entitled On the mathematics of the Jeffreys-Lindley paradox. Following the philosophical papers of last year, by Ari Spanos, Jan Sprenger, Guillaume Rochefort-Maranda, and myself, this provides a more statistical view on the paradox. Or “paradox”… Even though I strongly disagree with the conclusion, namely that a finite (prior) variance σ² should be used in the Gaussian prior. And fall back on classical Type I and Type II errors. So, in that sense, the authors avoid the Jeffreys-Lindley paradox altogether!

The argument against considering a limiting value for the posterior probability is that it converges to 0, 21, or an intermediate value. In the first two cases it is useless. In the medium case. achieved when the prior probability of the null and alternative hypotheses depend on variance σ². While I do not want to argue in favour of my 1993 solution

\rho(\sigma) = 1\big/ 1+\sqrt{2\pi}\sigma

since it is ill-defined in measure theoretic terms, I do not buy the coherence argument that, since this prior probability converges to zero when σ² goes to infinity, the posterior probability should also go to zero. In the limit, probabilistic reasoning fails since the prior under the alternative is a measure not a probability distribution… We should thus abstain from over-interpreting improper priors. (A sin sometimes committed by Jeffreys himself in his book!)

another view on Jeffreys-Lindley paradox

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on January 15, 2015 by xi'an

I found another paper on the Jeffreys-Lindley paradox. Entitled “A Misleading Intuition and the Bayesian Blind Spot: Revisiting the Jeffreys-Lindley’s Paradox”. Written by Guillaume Rochefort-Maranda, from Université Laval, Québec.

This paper starts by assuming an unbiased estimator of the parameter of interest θ and under test for the null θ=θ0. (Which makes we wonder at the reason for imposing unbiasedness.) Another highly innovative (or puzzling)  aspect is that the Lindley-Jeffreys paradox presented therein is described without any Bayesian input. The paper stands “within a frequentist (classical) framework”: it actually starts with a confidence-interval-on-θ-vs.-test argument to argue that, with a fixed coverage interval that excludes the null value θ0, the estimate of θ may converge to θ0 without ever accepting the null θ=θ0. That is, without the confidence interval ever containing θ0. (Although this is an event whose probability converges to zero.) Bayesian aspects come later in the paper, even though the application to a point null versus a point null test is of little interest since a Bayes factor is then a likelihood ratio.

As I explained several times, including in my Philosophy of Science paper, I see the Lindley-Jeffreys paradox as being primarily a Bayesiano-Bayesian issue. So just the opposite of the perspective taken by the paper. That frequentist solutions differ does not strike me as paradoxical. Now, the construction of a sequence of samples such that all partial samples in the sequence exclude the null θ=θ0 is not a likely event, so I do not see this as a paradox even or especially when putting on my frequentist glasses: if the null θ=θ0 is true, this cannot happen in a consistent manner, even though a single occurrence of a p-value less than .05 is highly likely within such a sequence.

Unsurprisingly, the paper relates to the three most recent papers published by Philosophy of Science, discussing first and foremost Spanos‘ view. When the current author introduces Mayo and Spanos’ severity, i.e. the probability to exceed the observed test statistic under the alternative, he does not define this test statistic d(X), which makes the whole notion incomprehensible to a reader not already familiar with it. (And even for one familiar with it…)

“Hence, the solution I propose (…) avoids one of [Freeman’s] major disadvantages. I suggest that we should decrease the size of tests to the extent where it makes practically no difference to the power of the test in order to improve the likelihood ratio of a significant result.” (p.11)

One interesting if again unsurprising point in the paper is that one reason for the paradox stands in keeping the significance level constant as the sample size increases. While it is possible to decrease the significance level and to increase the power simultaneously. However, the solution proposed above does not sound rigorous hence I fail to understand how low the significance has to be for the method to stop/work. I cannot fathom a corresponding algorithmic derivation of the author’s proposal.

“I argue against the intuitive idea that a significant result given by a very powerful test is less convincing than a significant result given by a less powerful test.”

The criticism on the “blind spot” of the Bayesian approach is supported by an example where the data is issued from a distribution other than either of the two tested distributions. It seems reasonable that the Bayesian answer fails to provide a proper answer in this case. Even though it illustrates the difficulty with the long-term impact of the prior(s) in the Bayes factor and (in my opinion) the need to move away from this solution within the Bayesian paradigm.

Approximate Bayesian model choice

Posted in Books, R, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 17, 2014 by xi'an

The above is the running head of the arXived paper with full title “Implications of  uniformly distributed, empirically informed priors for phylogeographical model selection: A reply to Hickerson et al.” by Oaks, Linkem and Sukuraman. That I (again) read in the plane to Montréal (third one in this series!, and last because I also watched the Japanese psycho-thriller Midsummer’s Equation featuring a physicist turned detective in one of many TV episodes. I just found some common features with The Devotion of Suspect X, only to discover now that the book has been turned into another episode in the series.)

“Here we demonstrate that the approach of Hickerson et al. (2014) is dangerous in the sense that the empirically-derived priors often exclude from consideration the true values of the models’ parameters. On a more fundamental level, we question the value of adopting an empirical Bayesian stance for this model-choice problem, because it can mislead model posterior probabilities, which are inherently measures of belief in the models after prior knowledge is updated by the data.”

This paper actually is a reply to Hickerson et al. (2014, Evolution), which is itself a reply to an earlier paper by Oaks et al. (2013, Evolution). [Warning: I did not check those earlier references!] The authors object to the use of “narrow, empirically informed uniform priors” for the reason reproduced in the above quote. In connection with the msBayes of Huang et al. (2011, BMC Bioinformatics). The discussion is less about ABC used for model choice and posterior probabilities of models and more about the impact of vague priors, Oaks et al. (2013) arguing that this leads to a bias towards models with less parameters, a “statistical issue” in their words, while Hickerson et al. (2014) think this is due to msBayes way of selecting models and their parameters at random.

“…it is difficult to choose a uniformly distributed prior on divergence times that is broad enough to confidently contain the true values of parameters while being narrow enough to avoid spurious support of models with less parameter space.”

So quite an interesting debate that takes us in fine far away from the usual worries about ABC model choice! We are more at the level empirical versus natural Bayes, seen in the literature of the 80’s. (The meaning of empirical Bayes is not that clear in the early pages as the authors seem to involve any method using the data “twice”.) I actually do not remember reading papers about the formal properties of model choice done through classical empirical Bayes techniques. Except the special case of Aitkin’s (1991,2009) integrated likelihood. Which is essentially the analysis performed on the coin toy example (p.7)

“…models with more divergence parameters will be forced to integrate over much greater parameter space, all with equal prior density, and much of it with low likelihood.”

The above argument is an interesting rephrasing of Lindley’s paradox, which I cannot dispute, but of course it does not solve the fundamental issue of how to choose the prior away from vague uniform priors… I also like the quote “the estimated posterior probability of a model is a single value (rather than a distribution) lacking a measure of posterior uncertainty” as this is an issue on which we are currently working. I fully agree with the statement and we think an alternative assessment to posterior probabilities could be more appropriate for model selection in ABC settings (paper soon to come, hopefully!).

on alternative perspectives and solutions on Bayesian tests

Posted in Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on December 16, 2013 by xi'an

Here are the slides of my tutorial at O’ Bayes 2013 today, a pot-pourri of various, recent and less recent, criticisms (with, albeit less than usual, a certain proportion of recycled slides):

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