Archive for abcrf

Astrostatistics school

Posted in Mountains, pictures, R, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 17, 2017 by xi'an

What a wonderful week at the Astrostat [Indian] summer school in Autrans! The setting was superb, on the high Vercors plateau overlooking both Grenoble [north] and Valence [west], with the colours of the Fall at their brightest on the foliage of the forests rising on both sides of the valley and a perfect green on the fields at the centre, with sun all along, sharp mornings and warm afternoons worthy of a late Indian summer, too many running trails [turning into X country ski trails in the Winter] to contemplate for a single week [even with three hours of running over two days], many climbing sites on the numerous chalk cliffs all around [but a single afternoon for that, more later in another post!]. And of course a group of participants eager to learn about Bayesian methodology and computational algorithms, from diverse [astronomy, cosmology and more] backgrounds, trainings and countries. I was surprised at the dedication of the participants travelling all the way from Chile, Péru, and Hong Kong for the sole purpose of attending the school. David van Dyk gave the first part of the school on Bayesian concepts and MCMC methods, Roberto Trotta the second part on Bayesian model choice and hierarchical models, and myself a third part on, surprise, surprise!, approximate Bayesian computation. Plus practicals on R.

As it happens Roberto had to cancel his participation and I turned for a session into Christian Roberto, presenting his slides in the most objective possible fashion!, as a significant part covered nested sampling and Savage-Dickey ratios, not exactly my favourites for estimating constants. David joked that he was considering postponing his flight to see me talk about these, but I hope I refrained from engaging into controversy and criticisms… If anything because this was not of interest for the participants. Indeed when I started presenting ABC through what I thought was a pedestrian example, namely Rasmus Baath’s socks, I found that the main concern was not running an MCMC sampler or a substitute ABC algorithm but rather an healthy questioning of the construction of the informative prior in that artificial setting, which made me quite glad I had planned to cover this example rather than an advanced model [as, e.g., one of those covered in the packages abc, abctools, or abcrf]. Because it generated those questions about the prior [why a Negative Binomial? why these hyperparameters? &tc.] and showed how programming ABC turned into a difficult exercise even in this toy setting. And while I wanted to give my usual warning about ABC model choice and argue for random forests as a summary selection tool, I feel I should have focussed instead on another example, as this exercise brings out so clearly the conceptual difficulties with what is taught. Making me quite sorry I had to leave one day earlier. [As did missing an extra run!] Coming back by train through the sunny and grape-covered slopes of Burgundy hills was an extra reward [and no one in the train commented about the local cheese travelling in my bag!]

 

MCM 2017 snapshots [#2]

Posted in Books, pictures, Running, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on July 7, 2017 by xi'an

On the second day of MCM 2017, Emmanuel Gobet (from Polytechnique) gave the morning plenary talk on regression Monte Carlo methods, where he presented several ways of estimating conditional means of rv’s in nested problems where conditioning involves other conditional expectations. While interested in such problems in connection with ABC, I could not see how the techniques developed therein could apply to said problems.

By some of random chance, I ended up attending a hard-core random generation session where the speakers were discussing discrepancies between GNU library generators [I could not understand the target of interest and using MCMC till convergence seemed prone to false positives!], and failed statistical tests of some 64-bit Mersenne Twisters, and low discrepancy on-line subsamples of Uniform samples. Most exciting of all, Josef Leydold gave a talk on ratio-of-uniforms, on which I spent some time a while ago  (till ending up reinventing the wheel!), with highly refined cuts of the original box.

My own 180 slides [for a 50mn talk] somewhat worried my chairman, Art Owen, who kindly enquired the day before at the likelihood I could go through all 184 of them!!! I had appended the ABC convergence slides to an earlier set of slides on ABC with random forests in case of questions about that aspect, although I did not plan to go through those slides [and I mostly covered the 64 other slides] As the talk was in fine more about an inference method than a genuine Monte Carlo technique, plus involved random forests that sounded unfamiliar to many, I did not get many questions from the audience but had several deep discussions with people after the talk. Incidentally, we have just reposted our paper on ABC estimation via random forests, updated the abcrf R package, and submitted it to Peer Community in Evolutionary Biology!

ODOF, not Hodor [statlearn 2017]

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on April 15, 2017 by xi'an

ABC random forests for Bayesian parameter inference [version 2.0]

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , on June 30, 2016 by xi'an

Just mentioning that a second version of our paper has been arXived and submitted to JMLR, the main input being the inclusion of a reference to the abcrf package. And just repeating our best selling arguments that (i) forests do not require a preliminary selection of the summary statistics, since an arbitrary number of summaries can be used as input for the random forest, even when including a large number of useless white noise variables; (b) there is no longer a tolerance level involved in the process, since the many trees in the random forest define a natural if rudimentary distance that corresponds to being or not being in the same leaf as the observed vector of summary statistics η(y); (c) the size of the reference table simulated from the prior (predictive) distribution does not need to be as large as for in usual ABC settings and hence this approach leads to significant gains in computing time since the production of the reference table usually is the costly part! To the point that deriving a different forest for each univariate transform of interest is truly a minor drag in the overall computing cost of the approach.

ABC random forests for Bayesian parameter inference

Posted in Books, Kids, R, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2016 by xi'an

Before leaving Helsinki, we arXived [from the Air France lounge!] the paper Jean-Michel presented on Monday at ABCruise in Helsinki. This paper summarises the experiments Louis conducted over the past months to assess the great performances of a random forest regression approach to ABC parameter inference. Thus validating in this experimental sense the use of this new approach to conducting ABC for Bayesian inference by random forests. (And not ABC model choice as in the Bioinformatics paper with Pierre Pudlo and others.)

I think the major incentives in exploiting the (still mysterious) tool of random forests [against more traditional ABC approaches like Fearnhead and Prangle (2012) on summary selection] are that (i) forests do not require a preliminary selection of the summary statistics, since an arbitrary number of summaries can be used as input for the random forest, even when including a large number of useless white noise variables; (b) there is no longer a tolerance level involved in the process, since the many trees in the random forest define a natural if rudimentary distance that corresponds to being or not being in the same leaf as the observed vector of summary statistics η(y); (c) the size of the reference table simulated from the prior (predictive) distribution does not need to be as large as for in usual ABC settings and hence this approach leads to significant gains in computing time since the production of the reference table usually is the costly part! To the point that deriving a different forest for each univariate transform of interest is truly a minor drag in the overall computing cost of the approach.

An intriguing point we uncovered through Louis’ experiments is that an unusual version of the variance estimator is preferable to the standard estimator: we indeed exposed better estimation performances when using a weighted version of the out-of-bag residuals (which are computed as the differences between the simulated value of the parameter transforms and their expectation obtained by removing the random trees involving this simulated value). Another intriguing feature [to me] is that the regression weights as proposed by Meinshausen (2006) are obtained as an average of the inverse of the number of terms in the leaf of interest. When estimating the posterior expectation of a transform h(θ) given the observed η(y), this summary statistic η(y) ends up in a given leaf for each tree in the forest and all that matters for computing the weight is the number of points from the reference table ending up in this very leaf. I do find this difficult to explain when confronting the case when many simulated points are in the leaf against the case when a single simulated point makes the leaf. This single point ends up being much more influential that all the points in the other situation… While being an outlier of sorts against the prior simulation. But now that I think more about it (after an expensive Lapin Kulta beer in the Helsinki airport while waiting for a change of tire on our airplane!), it somewhat makes sense that rare simulations that agree with the data should be weighted much more than values that stem from the prior simulations and hence do not translate much of an information brought by the observation. (If this sounds murky, blame the beer.) What I found great about this new approach is that it produces a non-parametric evaluation of the cdf of the quantity of interest h(θ) at no calibration cost or hardly any. (An R package is in the making, to be added to the existing R functions of abcrf we developed for the ABC model choice paper.)

ABC model choice via random forests [and no fire]

Posted in Books, pictures, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 4, 2015 by xi'an

While my arXiv newspage today had a puzzling entry about modelling UFOs sightings in France, it also broadcast our revision of Reliable ABC model choice via random forests, version that we resubmitted today to Bioinformatics after a quite thorough upgrade, the most dramatic one being the realisation we could also approximate the posterior probability of the selected model via another random forest. (With no connection with the recent post on forest fires!) As discussed a little while ago on the ‘Og. And also in conjunction with our creating the abcrf R package for running ABC model choice out of a reference table. While it has been an excruciatingly slow process (the initial version of the arXived document dates from June 2014, the PNAS submission was rejected for not being enough Bayesian, and the latest revision took the whole summer), the slow maturation of our thoughts on the model choice issues led us to modify the role of random forests in the ABC approach to model choice, in that we reverted our earlier assessment that they could only be trusted for selecting the most likely model, by realising this summer the corresponding posterior could be expressed as a posterior loss and estimated by a secondary forest. As first considered in Stoehr et al. (2014). (In retrospect, this brings an answer to one of the earlier referee’s comments.) Next goal is to incorporate those changes in DIYABC (and wait for the next version of the software to appear). Another best-selling innovation due to Arnaud: we added a practical implementation section in the format of FAQ for issues related with the calibration of the algorithms.

abcfr 0.9-3

Posted in R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on August 27, 2015 by xi'an

garden tree, Jan. 12, 2012In conjunction with our reliable ABC model choice via random forest paper, about to be resubmitted to Bioinformatics, we have contributed an R package called abcrf that produces a most likely model and its posterior probability out of an ABC reference table. In conjunction with the realisation that we could devise an approximation to the (ABC) posterior probability using a secondary random forest. “We” meaning Jean-Michel Marin and Pierre Pudlo, as I only acted as a beta tester!

abcrfThe package abcrf consists of three functions:

  • abcrf, which constructs a random forest from a reference table and returns an object of class `abc-rf’;
  • plot.abcrf, which gives both variable importance plot of a model choice abc-rf object and the projection of the reference table on the LDA axes;
  • predict.abcrf, which predict the model for new data and evaluate the posterior probability of the MAP.

An illustration from the manual:

data(snp)
data(snp.obs)
mc.rf <- abcrf(snp[1:1e3, 1], snp[1:1e3, -1])
predict(mc.rf, snp[1:1e3, -1], snp.obs)